(100%) De Profundis (5)

in #krlast year (edited)

본 글은 지적활동증명(Proof of Brain) 워크시트입니다. 참여를 위해서는 반드시 번역 가이드를 읽으세요.


[71E] ✔︎ It is the imaginative quality of Christ's own nature that makes him this palpitating centre of romance. The strange figures of poetic drama and ballad are made by the imagination of others, but out of his own imagination entirely did Jesus of Nazareth create himself. The cry of Isaiah had really no more to do with his coming than the song of the nightingale has to do with the rising of the moon--no more, though perhaps no less. He was the denial as well as the affirmation of prophecy. For every expectation that he fulfilled there was another that he destroyed. 'In all beauty,' says Bacon, 'there is some strangeness of proportion,' and of those who are born of the spirit--of those, that is to say, who like himself are dynamic forces--Christ says that they are like the wind that 'bloweth where it listeth, and no man can tell whence it cometh and whither it goeth.' That is why he is so fascinating to artists. He has all the colour elements of life: mystery, strangeness, pathos, suggestion, ecstasy, love. He appeals to the temper of wonder, and creates that mood in which alone he can be understood.

[72E] ✔︎ And to me it is a joy to remember that if he is 'of imagination all compact,' the world itself is of the same substance. I said in 「Dorian Gray」 that the great sins of the world take place in the brain: but it is in the brain that everything takes place. We know now that we do not see with the eyes or hear with the ears. They are really channels for the transmission, adequate or inadequate, of sense impressions. It is in the brain that the poppy is red, that the apple is odorous, that the skylark sings.

[73E] ✔︎ Of late I have been studying with diligence the four prose poems about Christ. At Christmas I managed to get hold of a Greek Testament, and every morning, after I had cleaned my cell and polished my tins, I read a little of the Gospels, a dozen verses taken by chance anywhere. It is a delightful way of opening the day. Every one, even in a turbulent, ill- disciplined life, should do the same. Endless repetition, in and out of season, has spoiled for us the freshness, the naivete, the simple romantic charm of the Gospels. We hear them read far too often and far too badly, and all repetition is anti-spiritual. When one returns to the Greek; it is like going into a garden of lilies out of some, narrow and dark house.

[74E] ✔︎ And to me, the pleasure is doubled by the reflection that it is extremely probable that we have the actual terms, the 「ipsissima verba」, used by Christ. It was always supposed that Christ talked in Aramaic. Even Renan thought so. But now we know that the Galilean peasants, like the Irish peasants of our own day, were bilingual, and that Greek was the ordinary language of intercourse all over Palestine, as indeed all over the Eastern world. I never liked the idea that we knew of Christ's own words only through a translation of a translation. It is a delight to me to think that as far as his conversation was concerned, Charmides might have listened to him, and Socrates reasoned with him, and Plato understood him: that he really said [Greek text], that when he thought of the lilies of the field and how they neither toil nor spin, his absolute expression was [Greek text], and that his last word when he cried out 'my life has been completed, has reached its fulfilment, has been perfected,' was exactly as St. John tells us it was: [Greek text]--no more.

[75E] ✔︎ While in reading the Gospels--particularly that of St. John himself, or whatever early Gnostic took his name and mantle--I see the continual assertion of the imagination as the basis of all spiritual and material life, I see also that to Christ imagination was simply a form of love, and that to him love was lord in the fullest meaning of the phrase. Some six weeks ago I was allowed by the doctor to have white bread to eat instead of the coarse black or brown bread of ordinary prison fare. It is a great delicacy. It will sound strange that dry bread could possibly be a delicacy to any one. To me it is so much so that at the close of each meal I carefully eat whatever crumbs may be left on my tin plate, or have fallen on the rough towel that one uses as a cloth so as not to soil one's table; and I do so not from hunger--I get now quite sufficient food--but simply in order that nothing should be wasted of what is given to me. So one should look on love.

[76E] ✔︎ Christ, like all fascinating personalities, had the power of not merely saying beautiful things himself, but of making other people say beautiful things to him; and I love the story St. Mark tells us about the Greek woman, who, when as a trial of her faith he said to her that he could not give her the bread of the children of Israel, answered him that the little dogs--([Greek text], 'little dogs' it should be rendered)--who are under the table eat of the crumbs that the children let fall. Most people live for love and admiration. But it is by love and admiration that we should live. If any love is shown us we should recognise that we are quite unworthy of it. Nobody is worthy to be loved. The fact that God loves man shows us that in the divine order of ideal things it is written that eternal love is to be given to what is eternally unworthy. Or if that phrase seems to be a bitter one to bear, let us say that every one is worthy of love, except him who thinks that he is. Love is a sacrament that should be taken kneeling, and 「Domine, non sum dignus」 should be on the lips and in the hearts of those who receive it.

[77E] ✔︎ If ever I write again, in the sense of producing artistic work, there are just two subjects on which and through which I desire to express myself: one is 'Christ as the precursor of the romantic movement in life': the other is 'The artistic life considered in its relation to conduct.' The first is, of course, intensely fascinating, for I see in Christ not merely the essentials of the supreme romantic type, but all the accidents, the wilfulnesses even, of the romantic temperament also. He was the first person who ever said to people that they should live 'flower-like lives.' He fixed the phrase. He took children as the type of what people should try to become. He held them up as examples to their elders, which I myself have always thought the chief use of children, if what is perfect should have a use. Dante describes the soul of a man as coming from the hand of God 'weeping and laughing like a little child,' and Christ also saw that the soul of each one should be 「a guisa di fanciulla che piangendo e ridendo pargoleggia」. He felt that life was changeful, fluid, active, and that to allow it to be stereotyped into any form was death. He saw that people should not be too serious over material, common interests: that to be unpractical was to be a great thing: that one should not bother too much over affairs. The birds didn't, why should man? He is charming when he says, 'Take no thought for the morrow; is not the soul more than meat? is not the body more than raiment?' A Greek might have used the latter phrase. It is full of Greek feeling. But only Christ could have said both, and so summed up life perfectly for us.

[78E] ✔︎ His morality is all sympathy, just what morality should be. If the only thing that he ever said had been, 'Her sins are forgiven her because she loved much,' it would have been worth while dying to have said it. His justice is all poetical justice, exactly what justice should be. The beggar goes to heaven because he has been unhappy. I cannot conceive a better reason for his being sent there. The people who work for an hour in the vineyard in the cool of the evening receive just as much reward as those who have toiled there all day long in the hot sun. Why shouldn't they? Probably no one deserved anything. Or perhaps they were a different kind of people. Christ had no patience with the dull lifeless mechanical systems that treat people as if they were things, and so treat everybody alike: for him there were no laws: there were exceptions merely, as if anybody, or anything, for that matter, was like aught else in the world!

[79E] ✔︎ That which is the very keynote of romantic art was to him the proper basis of natural life. He saw no other basis. And when they brought him one, taken in the very act of sin and showed him her sentence written in the law, and asked him what was to be done, he wrote with his finger on the ground as though he did not hear them, and finally, when they pressed him again, looked up and said, 'Let him of you who has never sinned be the first to throw the stone at her.' It was worth while living to have said that.

[80E] ✔︎ Like all poetical natures he loved ignorant people. He knew that in the soul of one who is ignorant there is always room for a great idea. But he could not stand stupid people, especially those who are made stupid by education: people who are full of opinions not one of which they even understand, a peculiarly modern type, summed up by Christ when he describes it as the type of one who has the key of knowledge, cannot use it himself, and does not allow other people to use it, though it may be made to open the gate of God's Kingdom. His chief war was against the Philistines. That is the war every child of light has to wage. Philistinism was the note of the age and community in which he lived. In their heavy inaccessibility to ideas, their dull respectability, their tedious orthodoxy, their worship of vulgar success, their entire preoccupation with the gross materialistic side of life, and their ridiculous estimate of themselves and their importance, the Jews of Jerusalem in Christ's day were the exact counterpart of the British Philistine of our own. Christ mocked at the 'whited sepulchre' of respectability, and fixed that phrase for ever. He treated worldly success as a thing absolutely to be despised. He saw nothing in it at all. He looked on wealth as an encumbrance to a man. He would not hear of life being sacrificed to any system of thought or morals. He pointed out that forms and ceremonies were made for man, not man for forms and ceremonies. He took sabbatarianism as a type of the things that should be set at nought. The cold philanthropies, the ostentatious public charities, the tedious formalisms so dear to the middle-class mind, he exposed with utter and relentless scorn. To us, what is termed orthodoxy is merely a facile unintelligent acquiescence; but to them, and in their hands, it was a terrible and paralysing tyranny. Christ swept it aside. He showed that the spirit alone was of value. He took a keen pleasure in pointing out to them that though they were always reading the law and the prophets, they had not really the smallest idea of what either of them meant. In opposition to their tithing of each separate day into the fixed routine of prescribed duties, as they tithe mint and rue, he preached the enormous importance of living completely for the moment.

[81E] ✔︎ Those whom he saved from their sins are saved simply for beautiful moments in their lives. Mary Magdalen, when she sees Christ, breaks the rich vase of alabaster that one of her seven lovers had given her, and spills the odorous spices over his tired dusty feet, and for that one moment's sake sits for ever with Ruth and Beatrice in the tresses of the snow-white rose of Paradise. All that Christ says to us by the way of a little warning is that every moment should be beautiful, that the soul should always be ready for the coming of the bridegroom, always waiting for the voice of the lover, Philistinism being simply that side of man's nature that is not illumined by the imagination. He sees all the lovely influences of life as modes of light: the imagination itself is the world of light. The world is made by it, and yet the world cannot understand it: that is because the imagination is simply a manifestation of love, and it is love and the capacity for it that distinguishes one human being from another.

[82E] ✔︎ But it is when he deals with a sinner that Christ is most romantic, in the sense of most real. The world had always loved the saint as being the nearest possible approach to the perfection of God. Christ, through some divine instinct in him, seems to have always loved the sinner as being the nearest possible approach to the perfection of man. His primary desire was not to reform people, any more than his primary desire was to a relieve suffering. To turn an interesting thief into a tedious honest man was not his aim. He would have thought little of the Prisoners' Aid Society and other modern movements of the kind. The conversion of a publican into a Pharisee would not have seemed to him a great achievement. But in a manner not yet understood of the world he regarded sin and suffering as being in themselves beautiful holy things and modes of perfection.

[83E] ✔︎ It seems a very dangerous idea. It is--all great ideas are dangerous. That it was Christ's creed admits of no doubt. That it is the true creed I don't doubt myself.

[84E] ✔︎ Of course the sinner must repent. But why? Simply because otherwise he would be unable to realise what he had done. The moment of repentance is the moment of initiation. More than that: it is the means by which one alters one's past. The Greeks thought that impossible. They often say in their Gnomic aphorisms, 'Even the Gods cannot alter the past.' Christ showed that the commonest sinner could do it, that it was the one thing he could do. Christ, had he been asked, would have said--I feel quite certain about it--that the moment the prodigal son fell on his knees and wept, he made his having wasted his substance with harlots, his swine- herding and hungering for the husks they ate, beautiful and holy moments in his life. It is difficult for most people to grasp the idea. I dare say one has to go to prison to understand it. If so, it may be worth while going to prison.

[85E] ✔︎ There is something so unique about Christ. Of course just as there are false dawns before the dawn itself, and winter days so full of sudden sunlight that they will cheat the wise crocus into squandering its gold before its time, and make some foolish bird call to its mate to build on barren boughs, so there were Christians before Christ. For that we should be grateful. The unfortunate thing is that there have been none since. I make one exception, St. Francis of Assisi. But then God had given him at his birth the soul of a poet, as he himself when quite young had in mystical marriage taken poverty as his bride: and with the soul of a poet and the body of a beggar he found the way to perfection not difficult. He understood Christ, and so he became like him. We do not require the Liber Conformitatum to teach us that the life of St. Francis was the true 「Imitatio Christi」, a poem compared to which the book of that name is merely prose.

[86E] ✔︎ Indeed, that is the charm about Christ, when all is said: he is just like a work of art. He does not really teach one anything, but by being brought into his presence one becomes something. And everybody is predestined to his presence. Once at least in his life each man walks with Christ to Emmaus.

[87E] ✔︎ As regards the other subject, the Relation of the Artistic Life to Conduct, it will no doubt seem strange to you that I should select it. People point to Reading Gaol and say, 'That is where the artistic life leads a man.' Well, it might lead to worse places. The more mechanical people to whom life is a shrewd speculation depending on a careful calculation of ways and means, always know where they are going, and go there. They start with the ideal desire of being the parish beadle, and in whatever sphere they are placed they succeed in being the parish beadle and no more. A man whose desire is to be something separate from himself, to be a member of Parliament, or a successful grocer, or a prominent solicitor, or a judge, or something equally tedious, invariably succeeds in being what he wants to be. That is his punishment. Those who want a mask have to wear it.

Sort:  

[80] 모든 시인적 성격처럼 그는 무지한 사람들을 사랑했다. 그는 무지 속에 언제나 위대한 아이디어의 가능성이 있음을 알았다. 그러나 그는 어리석은 사람들, 특히 교육을 받아 어리석게 된 사람들을 참지 못했다. 그들은 자신들도 이해하지 못하는 의견을 고수했고, 유별나게 현대적인 유형으로, 그리스도에 따르면 이들은 지식의 열쇠를 갖고 있으나 자신을 위해 사용하지 못하며, 다른 이들이 사용할 수도 없게 했다. 그럼에도 이는 신의 왕국의 문을 열기 위해 만들어진 것일지도 모른다. 그의 주로 속물주의자들과 전쟁했다. 이러한 전쟁은 모든 빛의 자녀가 치러야 할 것이었다. 속물주의자들은 그가 살았던 시대와 공동체의 유명 인사들이었다. 그들의 접근하기 힘든 아이디어와 젠채 하는 것, 그들의 지루한 교리, 저속한 성공을 위한 숭배, 삶의 물질만능주의적 측면에 대한 전체적인 몰두, 자신들 존재와 중요성에 대한 터무니 없는 판단에 대해서 말이다. 그리스도 시대에 유대인들은 지금의 영국의 속물주의자들과는 정확히 반대됐다. 그리스도는 '흰 무덤'의 훌륭함을 조롱했고, 이 구절을 영원히 바꾸었다. 그는 세속적인 성공을 완전히 경멸해야 할 것으로 취급했다. 그것들은 아무것도 아니었다. 그는 재물을 인간에게 거추장스러운 것으로 봤다. 그는 삶이 어떤 사상이나 도덕 체계에도 희생되어야 한다는 말을 듣지 않았다. 그는 형식과 의식은 인간을 위해 만들어지 것이지, 인간이 형식과 의식을 위해 만들어진 것이 아님을 지적했다. 그는 안식일주의를 포기해야 하는 것으로 받아들였다. 냉담한 자선, 허황된 공적인 자선, 중산층에게 몹시도 소중한 지루한 형식주의에 그는 말과 가차없는 경멸을 퍼부었다. 우리에게 정통이라 하는 것은 단지 우둔한 묵인이지만, 그들에게는, 그들의 손에는, 끔찍하고 압제적인 것이었다. 그리스도는 이를 쓸어버렸다. 그는 정신 하나만으로도 값진 것임을 보여주었다. 그는 그들에게 율법과 선지자들을 읽고 있음에도 그것들이 무엇을 의미하는지 정말이지 조금도 알지 못하는 걸 지적하는 큰 기쁨을 누리곤 했다. 그들의 각각 다른 하루를 정해진 의무를 따라 정형화된 방식으로 드리고, 박하와 회향으로 십일조를 내는 것에 반대로, 그는 전적으로 현재를 사는 것이 무척이나 중요함을 설교했다.

[77] 내가 다시 글을 쓴다면, 예술 작품을 만든다는 의미에서, 다루고 싶은 주제와 이를 통해 나를 드러내고 싶은 주제는 딱 두 가지다. 하나는 '삶의 낭만적 움직임의 선구자로서 그리스도'이고, 다른 하나는 '행위와의 관계를 숙소하는 예술적 삶'이다. 첫번째 것은, 물론, 아주 매력적이다. 그리스도는 단지 최고의 낭만적 유형의 본질일 뿐만 아니라, 순전히 우연히, 심지어는 의도적으로, 낭만적인 기질을 갖고 있다. 그는 사람들에게 '꽃다운 삶'을 살아야 한다고 말한 최초의 사람이었다. 그는 기존의 관념을 바꿨다. 그는 아이들을 어른이 닮아야 할 이들로 대했다. 그는 아이들을 어른들의 본보기로 내세웠는데, 나는 언제나 아이들을 주된 경우로 생각했다. 완벽한 무언가가 쓸모가 있어야 한다면 말이다. 단테는 사람의 영혼을 신의 손에서 비롯된 '어린 아이처럼 울고 웃는 것'으로 묘사한다. 그리스도는 각 사람의 영혼이 「어린아이가 울고 웃는 것처럼」되어야 한다고 봤다. 그는 삶이란 변화무쌍한 것이고, 유동적이며, 활동적이인 것이라 느꼈으며, 어떤 식으로든 정형화되도록 만든다면 죽는 것이라 느꼈다. 그는 사람들이 물질적이고 평범한 관심사에 대해 너무 심각해져서는 안된다고 봤다. 그것은 대단한 것이 아닌 비실제적인 것이고, 사람은 그 일에 지나치게 신경쓰지 말아야 했다. 새도 그러지 않는데, 왜 사람이 그래야 하는가? 그는 아주 멋지게 다음과 같이 말한다. '내일을 염려하지 말라. 사람이 고기보다 더 나은 것이 아니더냐? 몸이 의복보다 더 중한 것이 아니더냐?' 어느 그리스인이 마지막 문구를 사용했을지도 모른다. 그것은 온전히 그리스 느낌이다. 그러나 오직 그리스도만이 두 가지를 모두 말할 수 있었고, 그렇게 우리에게 삶을 완벽하게 정리해 보여줬다.

[76] 모든 매혹적인 성격과 마찬가지로 그리스도는 단지 아름다운 것들을 말할 수 있는 힘을 갖고 있었을 뿐 아니라, 다른 이가 자신에게 아름다운 것을 말할 수 있게 했다. 나는 성 마가의 이야기를 좋아하는데, 한 그리스 여자의 믿음을 시험하기 위해 그리스도가 이스라엘 아이들의 빵을 줄 수 없다고 말하자, 식탁 아래에 있는 작은 개--([그리스 문자], '작은 개'가 나와야 한다)--도 아이들이 떨어뜨린 부스러기를 먹는다고 대답했다. 대부분의 사람들은 사랑과 존경을 위해 산다. 그러나 우리는 사랑과 존경으로 살아야 한다. 만약 우리에게 어떤 사랑이 보여진다면 우리는 이를 이를 받을 자격이 없다는 걸 인식해야 한다. 누구도 사랑을 받을 자격이 없다. 신이 인간을 사랑한다는 것은 이상적인 것들의 신성한 순서를 따라 영원한 사랑은 영원히 가치가 없는 것에 주어지는 것이라고 적혀 있는 것임을 보여준다. 그 구절이 감당하기 힘든 구절인 것 같다면, 모두가 사랑받을 자격이 있다고 말하자. 자신이 그렇다고 생각하는 사람만 뺴고 말이다. 사랑은 무릎을 꿇고 받아들여야 할 성찬이며, 「주여, 나는 자격 없는 사람입니다.」라는 말은 그러한 사랑을 받는 이의 입술과 마음 속에 있어야 한다.

[74] 그리스도가 사용한 「바로 그 말씀」이라는 실제 용어를 우리가 갖고 있을 가능성이 몹시 높다는 것을 떠올릴 때 내 기쁨은 배가 된다. 그리스도는 언제나 아람말로 말한 것으로 알려져 있다. 르낭 또한 그렇게 생각했다. 그러나 이제 우리는 갈릴리의 소작농들이 오늘날의 아일랜드 소작농들과 마찬가지로 2개 국어를 구사하며, 그리스어가 팔레스타인 전역에서 통용되는 보편적인 언어라는 것을 알게 되었으며, 실제로 동양 전역에서는 그렇다. 나는 우리가 번역의 번역을 통해 그리스도의 말들을 알고 있다는 생각을 마음에 들어했던 적이 없다. 그의 대화가 고려되었으며, , 차르미데스가 그의 말을 들었을 지도 모르고, 소크라테스는 그와 함께 사고 했으며, 플라톤은 그를 이해했다고 생각하는 건 나를 기쁘게 한다. 그는 정말로 [그리스 문자]를 말했는데, 정말로 들의 백합이 수고도 아니하고, 길쌈도 아니하는 것을 생각할 때, 그는 [그리스 문자]로 이를 온전히 표현했다. 또한 그가 '내 삶은 완성되었으며, 온전해졌고, 완전하게 되었다.'고 외친 그의 마지막 말은 성 요셉이 우리에게 말했던 것과 동일했으며, 이는 [그리스 문자]였다.

[75] 복음서를 읽다보면--특별히 성 요한 또는 초기 그노시스주의자들이 택했던 이름이나 역할이 무엇이건--상상력을 계속해서 모든 영적이며 물질적인 삶의 기초로 주장한다는 것을 보게 되며, 그리스도에게 상상은 단순히 사랑의 한 형태일 뿐임을 본다. 그에게 사랑은 해당 구절의 완전한 의미에서 신이었다. 약 6주 전 의사 덕분에 나는 감옥에서 보통 먹는 텁텁한 검은 빵이나 갈색 빵 대신 하얀 빵을 먹을 수 있게 되었다. 그것은 대단한 별미다. 마른 빵이 누구에게나 별미가 될 수 있다는 말은 이상하게 들릴 것이다. 내게는 몹시도 별미여서 매 식사가 끝날 때마다 양철 접시에 남아 있는 빵 부스러기를 모두 정성스럽게 먹었으며, 식탁을 더럽히지 않으려 쓰는 헝겊으로 쓰는 거친 타월에 이를 담아왔다. 배가 고팠기 때문이 아니라--지금 내게 음식은 꽤나 충분하다--내게 주어진 어떤 것도 낭비해서는 안 되기 때문이다. 따라서 누구나 사랑을 추구해야 한다.

[77E] 내가 다시 글을 쓴다면, 예술 작품을 만든다는 의미에서, 다루고 싶은 주제와 이를 통해 나를 드러내고 싶은 주제는 딱 두 가지다. 하나는 '삶의 낭만적 움직임의 선구자로서 그리스도'이고, 다른 하나는 '행위와의 관계를 숙고한 예술적 삶'이다. 첫 번째 것은, 물론, 아주 매력적이다. 그리스도는 단지 최고의 낭만적 유형의 정수일 뿐만 아니라, 순전히 우연적이고 때로는 의도적인 낭만적인 기질을 갖고 있다. 그는 사람들에게 '꽃다운 삶'을 살아야 한다고 말한 최초의 인물이었다. 그는 기존의 관념을 바꿨다. 그는 아이들을 어른이 닮아야 할 이들로 여겼다. 그는 아이들을 어른들의 본보기로 내세웠는데, 나 또한 언제나 아이들을 주로 그렇게 생각했다. 완벽한 무언가가 쓸모가 있어야 한다면 말이다. 단테는 사람의 영혼을 신의 손에서 비롯된 '어린아이처럼 울고 웃는 것'으로 묘사한다. 그리스도는 각 사람의 영혼이 「어린아이가 울고 웃는 것처럼」 되어야 한다고 생각했다. 그는 삶이란 변화무쌍한 것이고, 유동적이며, 활동적이라 느꼈으며, 어떤 식으로든 이를 정형화시키는 건 죽는 것이라 느꼈다. 그는 사람들이 물질적이고 평범한 관심사에 대해 너무 심각해져서는 안 된다고 봤다. 비실용적인 것은 위대한 것이며, 사람은 여러 일에 지나치게 신경 쓰지 말아야 했다. 새도 그러지 않는데, 왜 사람이 그래야 하는가? 그는 아주 멋지게 다음과 같이 말한다. '내일 일을 염려하지 말라. 영혼이 음식보다 더 나은 것이 아니더냐? 몸이 의복보다 중한 것이 아니더냐?' 어느 그리스인이 마지막 문구를 사용했을지도 모른다. 그것은 온전히 그리스적인 느낌이다. 그러나 오직 그리스도만이 두 가지를 모두 말할 수 있었고, 그렇게 우리에게 삶을 완벽하게 정리해 보여줬다.

[81] 그가 죄에서 구원한 이들은 단순히 그들 삶의 아름다운 순간을 위해 구원받는다. 막달리 마리아가 그리스를 만났을 때, 일곱 연인들 중 한 명이 준 비싼 석고 병을 깨고, 이를 그의 지치고 먼지투성이 발 위에 향료를 쏟았다. 그리고 그 한순간으로 인해 룻과 베아트리체와 함께 천국에서 눈처럼 흰 장미의 덩굴에 앉는다. 하나의 작은 경고로써 그리스도가 우리에게 말한 모든 것은 모든 순간은 아름다워야 하며, 영혼은 항상 신랑이 오는 것을 준비해야 하며, 언제나 사랑하는 이의 목소리를 기다려야 하며, 속물주의는 상상력에 의해 불이 켜지지 않은 단순히 인간의 한 본성적 측면이라 말했다. 그는 삶의 모든 사랑스러운 영향을 빛의 방식으로 봤다. 상상력은 그 자체로 세상의 빛이다. 세상은 상상력에 의해 만들어지지만, 세상은 이를 이해할 수 없다. 왜냐하면 상상력이란 단순히 사랑의 발현이고, 한 인간을 다른 이와 구별하는 것은 사랑과 그 능력이기 때문이다.

[85E] 그리스도에게는 무척이나 고유한 것이 있었다. 물론 새벽이 오기 전에 거짓의 새벽이 있고, 겨울날 갑자기 햇살이 가득 비치며 지혜로운 크로커스를 속여 때가 되기 전에 금빛 꽃을 피우게 하고, 어리석은 새들이 메마른 가지에 집을 짓기 위해 동료를 부르게 하는 것처럼, 그리스도 이전에 기독교인들이 있었다. 우리는 그것에 대해 감사해야 한다. 불행한 것은 이후로는 아무도 없었다는 것이다. 아시시의 성 프란시스만은 예외다. 신은 그가 태어날 때 시인의 영혼을 주었는데, 그는 꽤 젊은 나이에 가난을 신부로 삼는 신비스러운 결혼을 했다. 시인의 영혼과 거지의 육체로 그는 완벽함에 이르는 길을 어렵지 않게 찾아냈다. 그는 그리스도를 이해했고, 그래서 그리스도처럼 되었다. 우리는 성 프란시스의 삶이 진정한 「그리스도의 모방」이었음을 알기 위해 리베르 콘포르미타툼을 읽을 필요는 없다. 한 편의 시인 그의 삶을 그 책과 비교하면 이는 별것 없는 산문에 불과하다.

[80E] 시적인 심정을 지닌 모든 이들처럼 그는 무지한 사람들을 사랑했다. 그는 무지 속에 언제나 위대한 생각의 가능성이 있음을 알았다. 그러나 그는 어리석은 사람들, 특히 교육을 통해 어리석게 된 사람들을 참지 못했다. 자신들도 하나도 이해하지 못하는 의견을 잔뜩 가지고 있는 사람들, 유별나게 현대적인 유형으로, 그리스도에 따르면 이들은 지식의 열쇠를 갖고 있으나 사용할 줄 모르고, 다른 이들도 사용할 수 없게 하는 이들이었다. 그것이 신의 왕국의 문을 열기 위한 것일 수 있는데도 말이다. 그는 주로 속물주의자들과 격렬히 부딪쳤다. 이는 모든 빛의 자녀가 치러야 할 전쟁이었다. 속물주의자들은 그가 살았던 시대와 공동체를 특징 짓는 것이었다. 범접하기 어려운 그들의 아이디어와 젠채 하는 것, 그들의 지루한 교리, 저속한 성공을 위한 숭배, 삶의 역겨운 물질만능주의적 측면에 대한 전적인 몰두, 자신들 존재와 중요성에 대한 터무니 없는 판단. 그리스도가 살던 시대의 유대인들은 지금의 영국의 속물주의자들과 정확히 일치했다. 그리스도는 인습적 관습의 '회칠한 무덤'을 조롱했고, 그 구절을 못 박았다. 그는 세속적인 성공을 완전히 경멸해야 할 것으로 취급했다. 그는 그것에서 아무것도 발견하지 못했다. 그는 부를 하나의 짐으로 봤다. 그는 삶이 어떤 사상이나 도덕 체계에도 희생되어야 한다는 말을 듣지 않았다. 그는 형식과 의식은 인간을 위해 만들어진 것이지, 인간이 형식과 의식을 위해 만들어진 것이 아님을 지적했다. 그는 안식일주의를 전혀 가치가 없는 것으로 받아들였다. 냉담한 박애주의, 과시적인 공공 자선 활동, 중산층이 몹시도 중요시하니 지루한 형식주의에 그는 가차 없는 경멸을 퍼부었다. 우리에게 정통이라 하는 것은 단지 우둔한 묵인이지만, 그들에게는, 그들의 손에는, 끔찍하고 마비시키는 압제적인 것이었다. 그리스도는 이를 쓸어내 버렸다. 그는 오직 정신만이 값진 것임을 보여주었다. 그는 그들이 언제나 율법과 예언서를 읽지만, 그것들이 무엇을 의미하는지 정말이지 조금도 알지 못하는 걸 지적하는 데 열정적인 기쁨을 느끼곤 했다. 그들이 박하와 회향으로 십일조를 내듯, 매일을 판에 박힌 일상의 정해진 의무를 따라 정형화된 방식으로 헌납하는 것에 반하여, 전적으로 현재를 사는 것이 몹시도 중요함을 설교했다.

[71E] 그리스도를 두근거리는 로맨스의 중심에 있게 만드는 것은 그리스도 자신의 상상력이다. 시적인 극과 발라드의 낯선 형상들은 다른 이들의 상상력에 의해 만들어졌지만, 나사렛 예수는 전적으로 자신의 상상력으로 자신을 창조했다. 나이팅게일의 노래가 달을 뜨게 하는 것이 아니듯, 이사야의 외침은 예수가 세상에 온 것과는 아무 상관이 없었다. 그는 예언의 확언일 뿐 아니라 동시에 부정이었다. 그가 하나의 기대를 이룰 때마다 또 다른 것을 파괴했다. 베이컨은 '모든 아름다움에는 균형의 어떤 기묘함이 있다.'고 말한다. 그것이 바로 예술가들에게 그가 매혹적인 이유였다. 그는 신비함, 낯섦, 파토스, 연상, 황홀, 사랑이라는 인생의 모든 빛깔을 갖고 있었다. 그는 경이로워하는 기질을 가진 이들에게 호소하며, 자신이 이해될 수 있는 분위기를 만들어 낸다.

[85] 그리스도에게는 무척이나 특별한 것이다. 물론 새벽 이전에 거짓의 새벽이 있고, 겨울날 갑자기 태양이 가득 차 올라 지혜로운 크로커스를 속여 때가 되기 전에 꽃을 피우게 하기도 하며, 어리석은 새들이 마른 가지에 집을 짓기 위해 친구들을 부르게 한다. 그러므로 그리스도 이전에 기독교인들이 있었다. 우리는 그것에 대해 감사해야 한다. 불행한 것은 이후로는 누구도 없었다는 것이다. 아시시의 성 프란시스만은 예외다. 신은 그가 태어날 때 시인의 영혼을 주셨는데, 그는 꽤나 젊은 나이에 가난을 신부로 삼는 신비스러운 결혼을 했다. 시인의 영혼과 거지의 몸으로 그는 완벽에 이르는 길을 어렵지 않게 찾아냈다. 그는 그리스도를 이해했고, 그도 그리스와 같이 되었다. 우리는 자유의 모방이 성 프란시스의 삶이 진정한 「그리스도이 모방」이었음을 가르쳐주기를 요청하지 않는다. 그에 관한 책과 시를 비교하면 시는 그저 산문에 불과해진다.

[81E] 그가 죄에서 구원한 이들은 단순히 그들 삶의 아름다운 순간들로 인해 구원 받는다. 막달리 마리아가 그리스도를 만났을 때, 일곱 연인들 중 한 명이 준 비싼 옥합을 깨뜨려, 그의 지치고 더러운 발 위에 향유를 쏟았다. 그 한순간으로 인해 룻과 베아트리체와 함께 천국에서 눈처럼 흰 장미꽃 사이에 영원히 앉을 수 있게 된다. 하나의 작은 경고로써 그리스도가 우리에게 말하고자 한 것은 모든 순간은 아름다워야 하며, 영혼은 항상 신랑을 맞을 준비를 해야 하며, 언제나 사랑하는 이의 목소리를 기다려야 하며, 속물주의는 상상력에 의해 일깨워지지 않은 인간의 한 본성적 측면이라 말했다. 그는 삶의 모든 사랑스러운 영향을 빛의 방식으로 본다. 상상력은 그 자체로 세상의 빛이다. 세상은 상상력에 의해 만들어지지만, 세상은 이를 이해할 수 없다. 왜냐하면 상상력이란 단순히 사랑의 발현이고, 한 인간을 다른 이와 구별하는 것은 사랑과 그 능력이기 때문이다.

[71] 그리스도의 상상력은 그를 두근거리는 낭만의 중심에 있게 한다. 시극과 발라드의 낯선 형상들은 다른 이들의 상상력에 의해 만들어지지만, 나사렛 예수는 전적으로 자신의 형상을 창조했다. 이사야의 외침은 달을 뜨게 하는 나이팅게일의 노래보다 나은 것이 아니었으며--그 이상은 아니었지만 그럼에도 그 이하도 아니었다. 그는 예언의 확언일 뿐 아니라 부정이었다. 그가 성취한 모든 기대에도 불구하고 그는 또 다른 것을 파괴했다. 베이컨은 말한다. '모든 아름다움에는 어딘가 이상한 구석이 있기 마련이다.' 영에서 태어난 사람들 가운데서--즉, 자기 자신을 좋아하는 이들은 동적인 힘이다--그리스도는 그들이 바람과 같으며 '바람은 임의로 불며, 누구도 바람이 어디서 왔으며 또 어디로 가는지 알 수 없다.'고 말한다. 그것이 바로 예술가들에게 매혹적인 이유였다. 그는 미스터리, 낯섦, 연민을 자아내는 힘, 연상, 황홀, 사랑이라는 인생의 모든 빛깔을 갖고 있었다. 그는 경이로워하는 기질에 호소하며, 혼자서도 이해될 수 있는 분위기를 만들어 낸다.

[78] 그의 도덕은 모두 연민이며, 도덕이 무엇인지 보여준다. 만약 단 하나의 말만 해야 했다면 '그녀는 많이 사랑했기 때문에 그녀의 죄는 용서 받았다.'가 될 것이며, 이는 그가 죽어가면서 말할만한 가치가 있는 것이다. 그의 정의는 모두 시적인 정의이며, 정의가 무엇인지 보여준다. 거지는 그동안 불행했기 때문에 천국에 간다. 나는 그가 이곳에 보내진 더 좋은 이유를 생각하지 못하겠다. 저녁의 서늘한 포도밭에서 한 시간 동안 일하는 사람들은 뜨거운 태양 아래서 하루 종일 고생하며 일한 사람만큼 보상을 받는다. 그들은 왜 그러면 안되는가? 아마도 누구도 무엇을 받을 자격이 없을 것이다. 어쩌면 그들은 다른 부류의 사람들이었을 것이다. 그리스도는 사람들을 물건처럼 취급하는 따분하고 생기없는 기계적인 시스템을 견디지 못했고, 그래서 모두를 동일하게 대했다. 그에게는 아무런 법칙이 없었다. 그 문제에 있어서, 누구라도, 무엇이라도 예외는 있을 수 없었으며, 세계 어디에도 그런 것은 없었다!

[84E] 물론 죄인은 뉘우쳐야 한다. 하지만 왜? 그렇지 않으면 자신이 저지른 일을 깨닫지 못할 것이기 때문이다. 회개의 순간이 곧 그리스도인이 되는 순간이다. 무엇보다 이는 자신의 과거를 바꾸는 방법이다. 그리스인들은 그것이 불가능하다고 생각했다. 그들은 금언과 경구를 통해 말하곤 한다. '신들조차 과거를 바꿀 수 없다.' 그리스도는 가장 평범한 죄인도 그럴 수 있으며, 그것이 그가 할 수 있는 유일한 일임을 보여줬다. 그리스도가 질문을 받았더라면 --나는 이것을 꽤 확신한다--, 방탕한 아들이 무릎을 꿇고 눈물을 흘리는 순간, 매춘부에게 시간을 낭비하고, 굶주린 돼지 떼와 함께 쥐엄나무 열매를 먹던 지난날을 삶의 아름답고 성스러운 순간으로 변화시켰다고 말할 것이다. 대부분의 사람은 이를 이해하지 못한다. 감히 말하건대 이를 이해하려면 감옥에 가야 한다고 말한다. 그렇다면 감옥에 가는 것이 가치 있을지도 모른다.

[74E] 또한 그리스도가 사용한 「바로 그 말씀」이라는 실제 용어를 우리가 갖고 있을 가능성이 몹시 크다는 사실을 떠올릴 때 내 기쁨은 배가 된다. 그리스도는 언제나 아람말로 말한 것으로 알려져 있다. 르낭 또한 그렇게 생각했다. 그러나 이제 우리는 갈릴리의 소작농들이 오늘날의 아일랜드 소작농들과 마찬가지로 두 개의 언어를 구사하며, 그리스어가 팔레스타인 전역에서 통용되는 보편적인 언어라는 것을 알게 되었으며, 실제로 동양 전역에서처럼 말이다. 나는 우리가 번역의 번역을 통해 그리스도의 말씀을 알고 있다는 생각이 마음에 들었던 적이 없다. 그의 대화가 흥미로웠다는 걸 생각할 때면 기쁘다. 카르미데스도 그의 말을 들었을지 모르고, 소크라테스는 그와 함께 사고했으며, 플라톤은 그를 이해했을지도 모른다. 그는 정말로 [그리스 문자]를 말했는데, 정말로 들의 백합이 수고도 아니하고, 길쌈도 아니하는 것을 생각할 때, 그는 [그리스 문자]로 이를 온전히 표현했다. 또한 그가 '내 삶은 완성되었으며, 온전해졌고, 완전하게 되었다.'고 외친 그의 마지막 말은 성 요셉이 우리에게 말했던 것과 같았으며, 이는 [그리스 문자]였다.

[Greek text]가 본문에서 누락된 거 같네요.

[75E] 복음서를 읽다 보면--특별히 성 요한 또는 초기 그노시스주의자들이 빌려온 이름이나 역할이 무엇이건--모든 영적이며 물질적인 삶의 기초로 계속해서 상상력을 강조하는 것을 보게 되며, 그리스도에게 상상력은 단순히 사랑의 한 형태였고, 그에게 사랑은 완전한 의미에서 말씀의 신이었다. 약 6주 전 의사는 내게 감옥에서 보통 먹는 텁텁한 검은 빵이나 갈색 빵 대신 흰 빵을 먹어도 된다고 허락했다. 정말이지 맛이 좋았다. 맨 빵이 누군가에게 정말 맛있을 수 있다는 말이 이상하게 들릴 것이다. 그것이 몹시 맛있었던 나머지 식사가 끝날 때마다 양철 접시에 남아 있는 빵 부스러기와 식탁을 더럽히지 않기 위한 천으로 쓰는 거친 수건 위에 떨어진 부스러기를 남김없이 모두 먹었다. 배가 고팠기 때문이 아니라--지금 내게 음식은 꽤 충분하다--내게 주어진 어떤 것도 낭비하지 않기 위해서였다. 사랑할 때도 그래야 한다.

[87] 다른 주제인 예술적 삶의 행위의 관계를 내가 선택한다는 것에는 의심의 여지가 없을 것이다. 사람들은 레딩 감옥을 향해 '예술적 삶이 사람을 이끄는 곳'이라 말한다. 글쎄, 더 나쁜 장소로 이끌 수도 있다. 수단과 방법에 대한 치밀한 계살을 바탕으로 인생을 기민하게 추측하며, 언제나 자신이 어디로 가고 있으며, 가는지 아는 기계적인 사람들이 더 많다. 그들은 교구의 일원이 되고자 하는 이상적인 욕망에서 출발하여, 어떤 영역에서는 교구의 일원이 되고 그 이상은 되지 않는다. 자신과 별개인 무엇이 되고자 하는 사람, 의회의 일원이 되고 싶어하는 사람, 또는 성공한 식료품 상인, 저명한 변호사, 판사, 지루한 무엇이 되고자 하며, 성공적으로 자신이 되고자 하는 사람이 된다. 그것은 그의 형벌이다. 가면을 원하는 자는 이를 착용할 일이다.

[84] 물론 죄인은 뉘우쳐야 한다. 하지만 왜? 그렇지 않으면 자신이 한 일을 깨닫지 못할 것이기 때문이다. 회개의 순간이 곧 계시의 순간이다. 그보다 이는 자신의 과거를 바꾸는 방법이다. 그리스인들은 그것을 불가능하다고 생각했다. 그들은 현명한 경구를 통해 말하곤 한다. '신도 과거를 바꿀 수 없다.' 그리스도는 가장 일반적인 죄인이 이를 할 수 있음을 보여줬으며, 그것이 그가 할 수 있는 유일한 것임을 보여줬다. 그리스도가 질문을 받았더라면 --나는 이것을 꽤나 확신한다--, 그 방탕한 아들이 무릎을 꿇고 눈물을 흘리는 순간 말이다. 그는 삶의 아름답고 성스러운 순간 속에서 매춘부, 돼지 떼, 곡식의 껍데기를 먹는 굶주린 이들과 함께 자신의 존재를 허비했다. 대부분의 사람들은 이를 이해하지 못한다. 나는 감히 이를 이해하려면 감옥에 가야 한다고 말한다. 그렇다면 감옥에 가는 것이 가치있을지도 모른다.

[82E] 그러나 가장 현실적인 의미에서 그리스도가 가장 낭만적일 때는 죄인을 대할 때이다. 세상은 신의 완벽함에 가장 근접한 존재로서 성자를 언제나 사랑했다. 그러나 그리스도는 자신 안의 어떠한 신적 본능을 통해 인간의 완벽함에 가장 근접한 존재로서 죄인들을 사랑했던 것 같다. 그의 첫째 바람은 사람을 바꾸는 것이 아니라, 그저 고통을 덜어주는 것이었다. 그의 목표는 흥미로운 도둑을 따분한 정직한 이로 만드는 것이 아니었다. 그는 죄수들의 구호 단체와 그 밖의 현대 운동에 대해서는 거의 생각이 없었을 것이다. 세리를 바리새인으로 변화시키는 것이 그에게는 대단한 성취로 보이지는 않았을 것이다. 그러나 세상이 아직 이해하지 못하는 방식으로 그는 죄와 고통을 아름답고 성스러운 것이자 완벽의 한 형태로 간주했다.

[76E] 모든 매혹적인 인물과 마찬가지로 그리스도에게는 단지 아름다운 것들을 말할 힘뿐만 아니라, 다른 이로 하여금 자신에게 아름다운 것을 말할 수 있게 하는 힘이 있기도 했다. 나는 성 마가의 이야기를 좋아하는데, 한 그리스 여인의 믿음을 시험하기 위해 그리스도가 이스라엘 아이들의 빵을 줄 수 없다고 말하자, 식탁 아래에 있는 강아지--([그리스 문자], '강아지'가 되어야 한다)--도 아이들이 떨어뜨린 부스러기를 먹는다고 대답했다. 대부분의 사람은 사랑과 존경을 위해 산다. 그러나 우리는 사랑과 존경으로 살아야 한다. 만약 우리에게 어떤 사랑이 드러난다면 우리는 이를 받을 자격이 없다는 걸 인식해야 한다. 누구도 사랑받을 자격이 없다. 신이 인간을 사랑한다는 것은 이상적인 것들의 신성한 순서에는 영원한 사랑은 영원히 가치 없는 이에 주어지는 것이라고 적혀 있음을 보여 준다. 그 구절이 감당하기 힘든 구절인 것 같다면, 모두가 사랑받을 자격이 있다고 말하자. 자신이 그렇다고 생각하는 사람만 제외하고 말이다. 사랑은 무릎을 꿇고 받아들여야 할 성찬이며, 「주여, 나는 자격 없는 사람입니다.」라는 말이 그러한 사랑을 받는 이의 입술과 마음에서 나와야 한다.

[82] 그러나 가장 실제적인 의미에서 그리스도가 가장 낭만적일 때는 죄인을 대할 때이다. 세상은 신의 완벽함에 가장 가까이 접근할 수 있는 존재로써 언제나 성자를 사랑했다. 그러나 그리스도는 어떠한 신성한 본능을 통해 인간의 완벽함에 가장 가까운 존재로써 죄인들을 사랑했던 것 같다. 그의 주된 욕망은 사람을 바꾸는 것이 아니라, 그저 고통을 덜어주는 것이었다. 재미있는 도둑을 고루한 정직한 이로 만드는 것이 그의 목표가 아니었다. 그는 죄수들의 구호 단체와 그 밖의 현대의 운동에 대해서는 거의 생각하지 않았을 것이다. 술집 주인을 바리새인으로 변화시키는 것이 그에게는 대단한 업적으로 보이지는 않았을 것이다. 그러나 아직 세상을 이해하지 못한 태도로 그는 죄와 고통을 아름답고 성스러운 것과 완벽의 한 형태라 여겼다.

[78E] 그의 도덕은 모두 연민이며, 도덕이 무엇인지 보여준다. 만약 그가 단 한 가지 '그녀는 많이 사랑했기에, 그녀의 죄는 용서 받았다.'고 말했다면, 이는 죽어 가는 동안 말할 가치가 있는 것이었다. 그의 정의는 모두 시적인 정의이며, 정의가 무엇인지 보여준다. 거지는 그동안 불행했기 때문에 천국에 간다. 나는 그가 천국으로 가는 더 좋은 이유를 생각하지 못하겠다. 서늘한 저녁 포도밭에서 한 시간 동안 일하는 사람들은 뜨거운 태양 아래서 온종일 고생하며 일한 사람만큼 보상을 받기도 한다. 그들은 안 되기라고 하는가? 아마도 누구도 무엇을 받을 자격이 없을 것이다. 어쩌면 그들은 다른 부류의 사람들이었을 것이다. 그리스도는 사람들을 물건처럼 취급하고, 모두를 똑같이 취급하는 따분하고 생기 없는 기계적인 시스템을 견디지 못했다. 그에게는 아무런 법칙이 없었다. 단지 예외가 있을 뿐이었다. 마치, 누구나, 무엇이든, 어떤 일이라도, 세상의 그 어떤 것에도 예외가 있는 것처럼 말이다.

[87E] 다른 주제인 행동하기 위한 예술적 삶의 관계를 내가 선택했다는 게 분명 이상하게 보일 것이다. 사람들은 레딩 감옥을 가리키며 '예술적 삶이 사람을 이끄는 곳'이라 말한다. 글쎄, 더 나쁜 장소로 이끌 수도 있다. 빈틈없이 계산된 수단과 방법으로 삶을 살아가는 보다 기계적인 사람들은, 언제나 자신이 어디로 가고 있는지 잘 알고 있으며, 결국 그곳에 간다. 그들은 교구의 일원이 되고자 하는 이상적인 욕망에서 출발하여, 어떤 영역에서든 결국 교구의 일원이 된다. 그뿐이다. 본래의 자신과 다른 무엇이 되고자 하는 사람, 국회의원이나 성공한 식료품 상인, 저명한 변호사, 판사, 또는 비슷하게 지루한 무엇이 되고자 하는 이들은 언제나 자신이 원하는 것처럼 된다. 그것은 그의 형벌이다. 가면을 원하는 자는 이를 쓸 일이다.

[73] 늦은 시간까지 나는 그리스도에 관한 네 편의 산문시를 열심히 공부했다. 크리스마스에는 가까스로 그리스 성서를 손에 넣었고, 매일 아침 감방을 청소하고 깡통을 닦은 다음 복음서를 조금 읽었는데, 우연히 눈에 들어온 구절 십여 개였다. 이는 하루를 시작하는 즐거운 방법이다. 격동적이고 절제되지 않은 삶 속에서도 모든 이들은 똑같이 행동해야 한다. 끊임없이 계속되는 계절의 반복은 우리의 신선함, 순진함, 복음서의 낭만적인 매력을 망쳤다. 우리는 그것들을 너무 자주 그리고 너무 잘못 듣는다. 모든 반복은 반영혼적이다. 그리스 시대로 돌아간다면, 그것은 마치 좁고 어두운 집에서 백합의 정원으로 들어가는 것과 같다.

[73E] 최근 나는 그리스도에 관한 네 편의 산문시를 열심히 공부했다. 크리스마스에는 가까스로 그리스어로 된 성서를 손에 넣었고, 매일 아침 감방을 청소하고 깡통을 닦은 다음 복음서를 조금 읽었는데, 우연히 눈에 들어온 열두 구절을 말이다. 이는 하루를 시작하는 즐거운 방법이다. 모든 이들, 소란스럽고 규칙적이지 않은 삶을 사는 이들도 그렇게 해야 한다. 끝없이 계속되는 계절의 반복은 신선하고, 순박하고, 복음서의 낭만적인 매력을 망쳤다. 우린 그것들을 너무 자주, 또 너무 잘못된 방식으로 듣는다. 모든 반복은 반영혼적인 것이다. 그리스어 복음서로 돌아가는 것은, 좁고 어두운 집에서 백합의 정원으로 들어가는 것과 같다.

[79] 낭만적인 예술의 기조는 그에게 자연적 삶의 타당한 기반이었다. 그는 다른 근거를 보지 못했다. 무리가 큰 죄를 저지를 이를 그에게 데려와서 그녀의 죄몫을 보여주며, 어떻게 해야하는지 물었다. 그는 그들의 말을 듣지 않은 것처럼 땅에다 손가락으로 무언가를 썼다. 그들이 그를 다그치자, 마침내 고개를 들어 '너희들 중 죄 없는 자가 먼저 그녀를 돌로 치라.'고 말했다. 살아가며 그런 말을 하는 건 가치있다.

[72] 만약 그가 '모든 합의의 상상'이라면, 세상은 그 자체가 같은 본질을 갖고 있다는 걸 기억하는 것은 기쁜 일이다. 나는 「도리안 그레이」에서 세상의 큰 죄악은 머릿 속에서 일어난다고 했지만, 머릿 속에서는 모든 일이 일어나는 곳이다. 우리는 이제 눈으로 보거나 귀로 듣지 않는다는 것을 안다. 그것들은 정말이지 적절하거나 부적절한 감각적 인상을 전달하는 통로이다. 양귀비는 붉으며, 사과에서는 향기가 나고, 종달새가 노래 하는 일은 뇌 속에 있다.

[79E] 낭만적 예술의 기조는 그의 자연스러운 삶의 적절한 기반이었다. 그에게 다른 기반은 없었다. 무리가 죄를 저지르다 붙잡힌 이를 그에게 데려와서는 법에 정해진 그녀의 형벌을 보여주며, 어떻게 해야 하는지 물었다. 그는 그들의 말을 못 들은 것처럼 손가락으로 땅에다 무언가를 썼다. 그들이 그를 다그치자, 마침내 고개를 들어 '너희들 중 죄 없는 자가 먼저 그녀를 돌로 치라.'고 말했다. 그런 말을 한 것만으로도 살아갈 가치가 있는 것이었다.

[72E] 만약 그가 '상상력이 충만한'이라면, 이 세상의 본질도 같다는 걸 기억하는 것은 기쁜 일이다. 나는 「도리안 그레이」에서 세상의 가장 큰 죄악들은 머릿속에서 생겨난다고 했지만, 머릿속은 모든 일이 일어나는 곳이다. 우리는 이제 눈으로 보거나 귀로 듣지 않는다는 것을 안다. 그것들은 정말이지 감각적 인상을 전달하는, 적절하거나 부적절한, 통로일 뿐이다. 양귀비는 붉은색이며, 사과에서는 향기가 나고, 종달새가 노래하는 일은 머릿속에서 벌어진다.

[86E] 정말이지 이것이 결국 그리스도의 매력이다. 그는 예술 작품과도 같다. 그는 실제로는 아무것도 가르치지 않지만, 그의 존재 속에 들어옴으로써 누군가는 무엇이 된다. 우리 모두는 그의 존재를 향해 가도록 되어 있다. 우리는 적어도 생에 한 번은 그리스도와 함께 엠마오로 걸어간다.

[86] 실로 이는 그리스도의 매력이다. 그가 모든 것을 말할 때, 그는 예술 작품 같다. 그는 실로 아무것도 가르치지 않지만, 그의 존재 속에 들어옴으로써 누군가는 특별해진다. 모두는 그의 존재로 향해 갈 운명이다. 모두는 적어도 한 번은 생에서 그리스도와 함께 엠마우스로 걸어간다.

[83E] 이는 아주 위험한 생각처럼 보인다. 모든 위대한 생각은 위험한 법이다. 그러나 의심할 여지 없이 이는 그리스도의 신조였다. 그것이 진정한 신조임을 나도 의심하지 않는다.

[83] 이는 아주 위험한 생각 같다. 모든 위대한 생각은 위험하다. 그러나 그것이 그리스도의 신조라는 것에는 의심의 여지가 없다. 그것이 진정한 신조라는 것을 나는 의심하지 않는다.