Harvesting A Lot More Than Food

in gardening •  16 days ago

Not everyone who is passionate about or interested in growing their own food is always going to have the opportunity to do so. Community and shared garden spaces however, are a great way for those of lesser means to try growing on their own.

One nonprofit community resources center in Madison Heights, Virginia has been helping people in their community harvest a lot more than food.

The Madison Heights DePaul Community Resources organization offers support to those in the community who have developmental or intellectual disabilities. Through their work they hope to foster both individual growth and inclusion, they help people learn effective ways of interacting with their community.

Back in 2010 they started the garden project at the center and through that project they're now sowing companionship among those in the community, teaching about the importance of growing your own food, and fueling an appreciation for food and growing; bringing happiness to many.

Over the years, in their garden they've grown:

  • cucumber
  • tomatoes
  • green beans
  • strawberries
  • zucchini
  • herbs
  • potatoes

Community garden projects like this offer a great way for people to get to know those who live around them, to meet other people who might have valuable knowledge to share about growing. They are also a fantastic solution for those who don't have the space they desire to start growing.

Previous research that's looked at the impact of community gardens on things like vegetable intake and family relationships, have found that through these projects vegetable intake has drastically increased with participants. In other words, when they take part in the growing process, they might be more likely to consume more vegetables and fruits. As well, researchers have also reported seeing mental health benefits, physical benefits, and stronger family relationships, as a result of gardening.

Other studies have echoed the same message, that gardening might be vastly beneficial to our health in many ways.

Researchers suggest that growing your own plants and food could have meaningful impacts on health, that it might help to reduce symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress. It promotes physical activity and a stronger sense of community and family, it's a simple change to make in life that researchers have said could meaningfully increase the quality of someone's life.

Pics:
Pixabay

The information that is posted above is not intended to be used as any substitute for professional medical advice, or diagnosis or treatment. The above is posted for informational purposes only.

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@doitvoluntarily Ohh I would love to have an indoor garden!

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what's stopping you? :)

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@doitvoluntarily Ohh I live in a high rise apartment in Singapore with my family, and my room - the only space I have autonomy over - does not get direct sunlight. But I really hope to do so in the future when I get a home of my own.

I'm still figuring how to circumvent the problem of no sunlight in my room and making it a reality even right now (:

I started this Spring, and I am never going back to not growing.. no matter where I go. I have the knowledge I learned this year that will never be erased moving forward.

This is an interesting concept, and I often implore my human friends to come over and "pick their own" carrots, potaotes and other stuff. Some find it very neat, while others are still sort of "trapped" in the system of store buying.

I loved gardening, I do have my greenhouse growing our consumption.

@doitvoluntarily When everything seems to be lost and hopes vanish, these good actions appear, without a doubt agriculture is a good method to exercise people and a good way to relate
Thank you very much, dear friend, for making this excellent news known
I wish you a great day

Eating healthy is only the top layer of it. Yes gardening reduces stress and encourages a mental health as well. Interacting in a community based gardening system encourages a social and economic health creating relationships and bartering as needed. Definitely a win - win for all involved. Thanks for a wonderful example of positive energy being fruitful and growing on multi levels @doitvoluntarily