The Room Where Anna Pavlova Died

in travel •  last year

The Room Where Anna Pavlova Died in 1931

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Recently I stayed at an old hotel in Den Haag called Hotel Des Indes.

It’s one of those places frozen in time where upon entering, the more sensitive or empathic visitor will still feel the past, a time in which the artistic soul was something to be celebrated, with which one could still live a life of dignity. It lingers everywhere in every decorative detail, every heavy velvet drapery, every reflection of polished marble and crystal chandeliers. Every object was made with great artistic skill and sensitivity, a sensitivity which is no longer needed in today's utilitarian, fast paced, cold grey stone, this “castrated minimalism is the new sensuality and luxury” world. In old places like these I feel like my soul can come out of hiding. I'm intelligent. I've adapted to this modern world but it has not altered my true nature. I would gladly step into a time machine to escape to a world in which that which I can offer, that which is my unique gift, still has value.

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Anna Pavlova, the famous Russian ballerina died here in 1931 in the room to the right of the entrance, which is now used as a cigar smoking salon.

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She was on tour in The Hague and contracted pneumonia. Her doctor told her she needed an operation to save her life but would no longer be able to dance. She refused and died of pleurisy. Her last words were “Get my swan costume ready”. She died at 49 years old.

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I got a fever while staying at this lovely hotel and became a bit delirious. I felt so validated and cozy in such a beautiful environment where once the artistic soul was so highly prized. I started talking to Anna Pavlova. I played her some of my recordings and quietly whispered to her "see I'm one of your kind" ....shhhhh....

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I dont like the modern tables and chairs ... :P

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Lol. I have a theory that places that are so well preserved must have had bad times, otherwise they would have been continuously modernized. It's true, this hotel had 20-30s of rough times. I think it's interesting that so many pieces of furniture look like they were inspired by Lawrence of Arabia which must have been very modern...and the displays of electric light bulbs must have been quite the modern shocker at one point...and now to us looks a bit like a state fair/carneval.

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lol you took a whole century in a sway with your comment...true! lol

Thank you for this small history and art lesson. Truly enjoyed it, and I'm fascinated how beautiful woman she was. Also hotel does look like you entered into time machine, some wonderful time it was I bet.

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Thank you.

wow, this is a great place! a time travel back to Victorian times. Not too many hotels like this left.
In Canada, I was impressed by the splendor of the former Canadian Pacific hotels, like Banff Springs or the Empress in Victoria (pictured below), where you can still partake of traditional Victorian Tea Time.
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Fairmont Empress Luxury Vancouver Island Hotel
My photo is from 2009 - I see now on their website that they must have removed most of the ivy covering the facade.

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Those strange looking pines (or whatever they are), that look like some creatures out of 'Dark Chrystal' may be gone also. The hotel changed hands in 2014, so they may have gone for a new look. Too bad actually, I liked them because of their unique look. There is vegetation on Vancouver Island, in particular Victoria, that you won't find elsewhere in Canada, not even on the mainland BC coast, like the Vancouver area. There is a warm South-Pacific stream that kisses the shores of Victoria, and the climate is decidedly better there than anywhere else. There are palms growing in some gardens. One example you won't find elsewhere in the North-West: the Monkey Puzzle Tree
@corinnaherden: if the 'Wanderlust' ever takes you to North America again, this is the place to visit! I would have wanted to live there, but there was no work for me, so I stayed on the Prairies. But it was a place I visited often - driving 1270 km through mountain terrain on the Trans Canada Highway. Google says just under 15 hrs, but that never happens. There are often rock slides in the mountains blocking the road, and I once waited some 4 hours for the highway to get cleared.
Maybe if fancy strikes me I will post about this area - got tons of pictures.

Wow love your post, great contents and lessons.
I have upvoted you, follow me so that I will follow you.

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Hello there!
If you want to follow great contents also follow @cem
have a nice day! :)

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