WaterSeer: Harvest Water Directly From the Air

in technology •  2 years ago

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There is no doubting that access to clean water is a major issue in many parts of the world. In some places hours can be spent walking to the local clean water sources and painstakingly hauling it back by hand. It has been reported that dirty water kills 9,000 people, 5,000 of which are children, each day.

But what if there was a simple way to change that?

In comes WaterSeer, a new design from VICI-Labs that claims to be able to harvest up to 11 gallons(37 liters) of pure water per day from the air without using electricity.

Here’s how it works:

The unit is placed into a hole that is six feet deep, which cools the metal by being underground. The wind will spin the turbine, which spins fans that draw the air down below ground. When the air is cooled, water will condense along the walls and drip down into a reservoir. People can pump the water out by a tube. There is an air filter at the top, and they say it will still work even without wind. The WaterSeer’s condensation chamber is placed into a sleeve so it can be removed for cleaning.

WaterSeer

They tested the device at UC Berkeley Gill Tract Farm back in April of 2016, and are planning on testing it with the Peace Corps once their crowdfunding is complete. They ran some calculations off the results from that testing and came up with the 11 gallons number, but the local environment will dictate the actual amount harvested.

Check out this one minute video to see how it operates:

If you like what you see you can visit their IndieGoGo page, which has raised over $119,000 so far. You can even buy your own for just $134 and get it after the first production run is completed, which is slated to be sometime next year!

Airdrop water harvester

I must tell you though, this isn’t the first time something like this has been tried. Edward Linacre created his Airdrop water harvester which uses a small solar power panel to turn a fan to pull the air down below ground. He won the James Dyson Award for it in 2011.

Vena water harvester

If the WaterSeer is using the wind to spin a turbine, which then spins a fan – why not use the wind directly? This is what ORE-Design created, and it has zero moving parts! A tall pole with vents and a filter is open on all sides for the wind to flow through. Copper fins catch any moisture in that air which then drips down into the reservoir.

Invelox diagram

You could even combine the above mentioned technology with something like INVELOX by Sheerwind. That is a funnel that focuses the wind down and drives turbines for power generation, surely you could also harvest the moisture in that air AND generate electricity. But I understand if you don’t want to get too complex, as things break and require more knowledge to fix.

All these things remind me of ‘Wind Traps’ as described in Frank Herbert’s DUNE series. He wrote about how residents of that desert world used large tubes to funnel wind deep underground to collect water.

I think they have overestimated the amount of water that one of these could produce in a day. I still think that it'd be a cool thing to have as a backup water source, so I wish them all the best in this endeavor. But maybe what I really need is a droid that understands the binary language of moisture vaporators.

"Vaporators? Sir, my first job was programming binary loadlifters—very similar to your vaporators in most respects."


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upvoted and I think to buy one (really). Sure in my country it's always raining (Belgium) but I use lot of water per day just for dogs and cleaning it can be a substantial economy for me and less pollution for planet ;)

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Good idea! Plus you will have an independent source of water, a backup is always handy.

Bravo! excellent article can be the solution to many places without access to potable network, excellent publication, thanks for sharing

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You're welcome @jlufer. I think that could be a step in the right direction - especially for rural areas that are normally left out of major projects.

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Thanks for the resteem! I think these ideas are super cool too :D

What a great idea for the people who need something like this the most. It could change lives and transform developing countries.

Brilliant, brilliant, brilliant. What can I say?

Phenomenal post, @getonthetrain.

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With nearly $120,000 on IndieGoGo I think they are off to a good start! I am just helping spread awareness.

Very cool. I've seen different types of water capture systems, but not these in particular.
Atrapanieblas are used in the driest place on earth.
Warka Water is pretty cool too.

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Wow, that Warka Water is a big project! I read the whole site, pretty neat!

This is simply genius! miracle upvoted.

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This project is amazing! The ability to have a smallish device that can collect water from anywhere could be a game changer.

anything that saves lives is awesome

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That's for certain my friend :D

what a fascinating concept. In time it could truly solve the issue of getting clean water to everyone on the planet

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It's a huge issue, so let's hope that it does!


Hi @getonthetrain, I just stopped back to let you know your post was one of my favourite reads today and I included it in my Steemit Ramble. You can read what I wrote about your post here.

awesome.
It should work to desalinate water also.
bottom water is colder than surface water...
Build one of those things out of plastic plumbing pipe and bicyle parts and float it in a lake, river or sea....

or on a boat.

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Yea, should work as long as the bottom part is sufficiently cooler than the air above.

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Argh, you beat me to the vaporator joke! I had forgotten about the Dune reference. Well played!

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haha! Thanks, but now we can all be moisture farmers :D

Great post! In fact, it was so good that we decided to feature it in our latest newspaper. Read it here: https://steemit.com/steemplus/@steemplus/steemplus-tuesday-october-18-the-daily-newspaper-that-pays-you-to-find-high-quality-content