We Did It! Six More Dogs Safe in New England Now.

in tarc •  19 days ago

Thanks to the help and support of our Steem family, @fundition, @noblewitness, and our Vermont rescue partners, we transported six dogs to safety in New England! It was a good trip, and we feel great about their futures.

The photo above is of Gretyl getting first hugs from her new forever mommy. It speaks volumes about the quality of home our adoption partners find for these throwaway pets, and how much love is waiting for them with their new families.

Sadly, we didn't get video of Henry meeting his new forever mom. This is very unfortunate, because their introduction should have been recorded for posterity. The minute Henry saw her, he reacted not like a happy dog greeting a stranger, but like a dog seeing his beloved owner after a long separation. He wiggled and wagged and smiled and hopped around with glee. She scooped him up and the rest is forever-love history. She immediately dressed him in a new collar and cute fuzzy coat, and they were off to explore his new home. He never looked back.

Before any of that could happen, though, we spent days preparing for the trip. First was a trip to the vet for health certificates. Then the assembling of all paperwork relevant for each dog. Then came a five-day cycle of deworming, and finally the dreaded baths.

Below we see Gretyl and Henry getting a good scrub and soak as Ziggy looks on in horror. His turn came next. Yes, the water coming through the hose is warm. None of the bath victims seemed mollified by the fact that we didn't douse them in ice water, though--according to a succession of rigorous complaints filed by each of them with rescue management, baths are a form of torture and all hoses should be banned.

Loading went well. We've learned after years of doing this how to protect a vehicle so that upon our return (usually at midnight when we're all dead tired and delirious from lack of sleep) all we have to do is peel back the plastic and voila! No further cleanup needed. The dogs were all cozy in their crates, alone or with a buddy if that made them more comfortable. And off we went!

On the way, we saw some of this:

And a whole lot of this:

Then, approximately 18 hours later, allowing for fuel stops and potty breaks for everyone, we arrived in New Hampshire to be greeted by these smiling faces:

These ladies and the others there to intake the dogs are pros. We could tell within just a couple minutes of watching them in action. New Hampshire has some tough import quarantine laws, and this facility abides by them. It was impressive, watching this group in action. After 48 hours in observation, each dog would go on to be examined and cleared for adoption by a veterinarian. They were especially great with E.J., who is fearful of new situations and people. He was sad in the photo below, but it wasn't long before his tail came up and he started interacting with his surroundings.

Dusty and Ziggy were happy with the situation.

Barkley was a little unsure how he felt about things, but before we left he was barking up a storm, so all was well with him, too.

All in all, it was a fantastic trip and a huge lifesaving success for these dogs. Huge thank you again to everyone who made this possible. We are forever grateful for your generosity.

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Yay!!!! Oh, this makes me so happy! Hope you get some rest, and that all the dogs find fabulous forever homes. 💞💞💞

The ancient Mbaya Indians of the Gran Chaco in South America believed that humans originally lived underground until dogs dug them up.

Happy stories are always welcome. My four legged is sleeping next to me while I write this.
good job :)

❤️the picture of Gretyl and her new human companion.

Congratulations!

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Good job everyone! :)

Maybe it would be better to leave the dogs with their owners and help these owners to make it easier for them.

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Huh? What owners do you mean? These dogs were all dumped. Abandoned. Betrayed by their "owners" in a most despicable way. We don't even know who the "owners" were, because the dogs came to us from the side of the road or from concerned citizens who found them scrounging through trash looking for food. Their "owners" are criminals, guilty of violating Virginia Code 3.2-6504, and would be prosecuted if their identity could be determined. So I'm not sure what "owners" you mean. Perhaps you should read more of tarc's posts to find out what the situation is in Central Appalachia?

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Hello rhondak : D. Excuse me, I did not know that these dogs were dumped. Yes, they are then abandoned. Maybe the owner could not anymore, maybe he did not have any more money or had no more time. Food and medical expenses are also a lot of money and you might not be able to predict. Or all family members work or go to school and the dog suffers at home. Or maybe neighbors complain about barking. Maybe the owner knows, if he sets the dog off, that you are caring the dogs. Perhaps it is lucky for the dog that the owner releases it because otherwise the dog has to suffer with him. Maybe he does not mean it despicable. I would not say criminals. I know there are laws, but it's important to see things and try to understand everything from the ground up. There are many reasons why people can be condemned. But there are many reasons why people fall into a disaster. And we are all involved in that. Perhaps a store could allow a place to be found where people can donate dog food and hand it over to needy owners. Or that there is such a thing as a school for children, a place to stay for dogs, where dogs can then play or walk while the owners are at work or at school. That would be a good new profession. Or helping to pay for vet's costs. Maybe that would be anticipatory and would not happen then. Owners are also often left alone.

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The pictures are very, very beautiful and you are doing an outstanding work

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I have pictures that are not so beautiful. Pictures of heinous abuse, dogs starved to skeletons, bullet wounds to the head, dogs beaten to death with maul axes. You can't blame that on poverty, any more than you can blame poverty for the despicable acts of Robert Bowers yesterday in Pittsburgh. I am willing to bet that if you look into his history, you'll find instances of animal cruelty or neglect. Animal abusers are FIVE TIMES as likely to inflict violence on humans. You can't blame that on poverty, either.

My rescue is located only a few miles from McDowell County, West Virginia, where the first U.S. welfare was issued under Roosevelt. All these decades later, the community has become welfare and opioid dependent, with an unemployment rate nearing ten percent. How did handouts help them? You can't blame prescription drug addiction on poverty, either.

Bottom line is that these people are not victims, any more than the Nazis were victims when they committed genocide. This region of Central Appalachia houses ten percent of America's nursing home patients. Is it any coincidence that this is also the region of the country where pet owners are most likely to abandon their animals? I think when you take into consideration the fact that the generation now languishing in nursing homes here forgotten by their families is the same generation who taught their kids that drowning puppies in the creek is "cheaper" than spaying or neutering, then you have the answer to those staggering numbers. Teach your kids that anything that inconveniences you can be disposed of, and that's a prime recipe for mass abandonment of the elderly.

I know you mean well. Your heart is good. But there are evils in this world that simply can't be "loved" away. There are times when people must be held accountable for their decisions and their actions. When the innocent suffer as an accepted way of life, that is a very good time to start questioning that way of life. Also, in all of your charitable ideas, you never once suggested where the funding for such programs would come from. Somebody has to pay for all of those solutions you recommend. When you figure out who's willing to bankroll that kind of charity, please let me know and we'll implement something immediately.

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I can imagine that, rhondak. In many cases, however, this was due to poverty or past poverty. I do not know why Robert Bowers did that. And the Nazis who committed genocide? Why why. I do not know why. I hope it will never happen again. I saw the movie "The boy in a striped pajamas". Do you watch the movie, too? Because you say there are times when people have to be held accountable for their decisions and actions. It has always been the case that people had to give an account. This is nothing new. And why not everybody starts something new. Maybe everyone should stop their revenge and maybe the violence would disappear. Always the same routine. When life gets sick, countries must finally think of doing something new that does not make people sick, that heals adults and keeps our children healthy. Many would not be addicted to drugs and alcohol.
In German department stores sometimes something is set up where donations can be made for dogs. Unfortunately, I do not have much money, but I know that some people have more money.
You can announce that you will pick up the dogs if the owners can not keep them. Then they would not have to expose the dog.

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Again, where will the funding come from to pick up the dogs people don’t want anymore? It costs my rescue about $300 per dog to vet them for transport and adoption. Local shelter intake is about 1,000 dogs a year. Double that to include the dumped animals. 2000 x $300 is $600,000 per year. When you figure out how to raise over half a million dollars a year to take care of everybody else’s responsibilities for them, then I can take you a lot more seriously.

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I do not say that you take me seriously. I do not even know where to take the money to get rid of my debts.
Often you can not solve problems quickly, it takes time for things to change. Unfortunately, many suffer from it.