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Hi , i added many elements to it , i don't think it is a plagiarism
there are thousands of fake pictures running in steemitm wish you could make them stop!!! , is it fair to call my painting Art Plagiarism ?
,i really don't understand.

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It is not plagiarism! Adele, don't get discouraged by ignorant dilettantes!

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"
..: What Is Art Paraphrasing? :..

Literary plagiarism is a tangible, normally taught and understood moral that echoes the moral that "stealing is wrong." But, I don't get why it's not common understanding what it means to plagiarize art. So first, let's look at what literary plagiarism is: taking the original ideas in another's work and reproducing it with the intent of mimicking the original. This isn't just "tracing"--or, in the literary sense, copying word-for-word another's work, even when wording is rearranged or changed slightly. You may not be wholly quoting a work if you write it in your own words, but paraphrasing it is still stealing the ideas of the original piece. You're still stealing a paper if you keep the same thesis statement and supporting details, even if you wrote the paper entirely in your own words.

Similarly, art plagiarism is taking the basic composition of a piece of art and using that as basis to make your own image. Many examples I've seen of art plagiarism are really just tracings with minimal self-effort thrown in. You may not have a print-out of the "reference work" directly beneath your paper, and you may even be changing which character(s) are portrayed, but that still doesn't change the fact that the composition of a piece of art is the intellectual property of the original owner. (More on intellectual property later.) Let's go back to the example of what written paraphrased plagiarism is. You're still stealing artwork if you keep the same composition and specific details/arrangement, even if you changed which characters are portrayed and even if you drew the lines without tracing them. The specific combination of elements that together combine to form the overall composition of a work is the intellectual property of the original creator.

But, don't be fooled--just like it's art theft to combine multiple images into one image, it's art plagiarism to combine multiple "references" into a single piece. Identically copying any major element of another person's work is still art theft. (More on alluding to other works later.) If you were to give your character a keyblade that looks identical to Sora's, that's art plagiarism. You didn't make that design.
..."

https://www.deviantart.com/sacredflamingheart/journal/What-Is-Art-Plagiarism-READ-THIS-234951828

This one appears to be another false positive. Please, review.

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Looks false positive to me.

Yes, I have looked through the entire conversation. This is essentially new art.

When I used to have conversations in @ntopaz, it was about the liberal use of "fan art" of copyrighted characters. Given the platform upvotes artists for those work, I urged the owners to find out more where they stood legally before handing out monetary value to works that were not entirely original.

It would be cool if the artists showed us where they got their inspiration, but they do not have to. It is only a problem in specific scenarios.

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Ahhhh I see. Yeah they should most definitely credit the source that inspired their work. Thanks for clarifying

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so it was all your fighting ? nice

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As long as you add your creative source, there is no problem.

Posted using Partiko Android

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There doesn't have to be a "source" if she creates a new artwork inspired by something! Art is about getting inspired by all sorts of things and also other artists. If you don't get this then you should seek activities somewhere else because you clearly have no clue what you are talking about.

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Well that's what this whole thing was about and how it could have been avoided.

I didn't have anything to do with the post being listed here but think their point is fair. It's a courtesy to give the source material a mention.

If you ever watch DBZ abridged (a fan based parody if DragonBall Z), you will notice they give credit in the beginning of each episode to Funimation and Akira Toriyama.

It is a courtesy and users should be encouraged to do so. It doesn't take much time and perhaps sends traffic to the creator of the source of the inspired work.

Without their original work, the inspired works would not exist so think that's reasonable. @gric, not sure why you think this a hard thing and want to suppose anybody that doesn't is clueless. That's kind of an extreme way to think.

TL;DR: I think we both agree that we wouldn't call this necessarily plagiarism but we seem to disagree on whether on author should include source of creative inspiration.

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@anthonyadavisii,
Over decades I've been using tons of references/inspirations I found on the Internet. The Internet is to me and to most other artists a very important source of inspiration on many levels. But I also see many artists finding inspiration in my own work. I see it in games, in tattoos, in illustrations, in paintings. BUT THIS IS ALL NOT ABOUT PLAGIARISM! So if some anonymous denunciator like @jaguar.force can't tell the difference then I will certainly not encourage him/her in his/her moronic activities by discussing "his/her point". It's just another retarded asshole hiding behind an avatar and patronizing people!
If @adelepazani got inspired by a photo she can tell us, but she doesn't have to. It's her fucking business and not yours or the one of some self-entitled denunciator. She created a new and distinct artwork. It's neither a cover nor a replica. If you are in doubts then I'd suggest you ask professional VISUAL artists because as a marine, IT professional, blockchain enthusiast and meme-ologist this topic is certainly not within your expertise.

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