By train through Europe - 1st August - Kolding

in travel •  24 days ago

On the 1st of August, I went on a month-long trip through Europe together with @reggaemuffin . Along the way, we visited many countries and Steemians. I wrote a diary during our travel, which I will post day by day througout September.

Tour.JPG
Our originally planned route.


Early in the morning, @reggaemuffin and I left in a train headed to Frankfurt. This first part was rather uneventful and surprisingly awake, even though the anticipated 22 minutes to switch trains in Frankfurt caused a certain anxiety.

We hadn’t even arrived in Frankfurt yet though, when the announcement came through: Our connecting train had a delay of 25 minutes because of some disturbances in Mannheim. This gave @reggaemuffin the time to get himself a coffee (or “cold brew”, damn hipsters). We were promptly approached by two fellow backpackers, a young man and woman, who asked if we speak English. We did. They then told us that they’ve been backpacking for 6 weeks but messed up their planning and didn’t know how to get home now, as they were missing 7€ and had been trying to get them from someone since 6 am that day. This is, at least in Germany, a common story told by beggars (one guy in my city has been asking me for money for his ticket home since I moved there), but I chose to believe them in this case.

After giving them the 7€ and having done our good deed for the day, we boarded the train to Hamburg.

IMG-20180801-WA0008.jpg@suesa , waiting for the train in Frankfurt

In Hamburg, we spent not one, not two, but five hours waiting for our connecting train to our final destination of this day, Kolding. This hadn’t been our original plan, we had previously picked a train that would have made us wait one hour four minutes. But reservation was mandatory there, and the train had been full. Tough luck.

Turns out that some good fairy had been the reason we had been forced to pick the later train, as the 25 minutes delay turned into 30, 45, 50 minutes until finally, we were an hour and 20 minutes late. What would have ended in panic was now nothing more than a slight nuisance. At least for us, the two metal fans we encountered complained that they had been supposed to arrive at Wacken an hour ago.

At Hamburg main station, the hunt for a very specific Döner (Kebab) shop began, the one where I had my very first Döner, 7 years ago. We found it!

IMG_20180801_152336.jpgJust as I remembered

And then, we found power!

…. At Starbucks. We charged out laptops. Now you know how I was able to publish stories while on the road, free Wi-Fi and electricity!

At 19:01, we were finally … not able to proceed. Instead, we were offered a second chance to do a good deed, when our train to Kolding was canceled. I only caught this by chance, as I was checking the train app for the exact time the train would arrive. Next two us was a young couple, speaking what I assumed was Danish, so I asked them if they were aware that the train had been canceled. They were not. Together, we picked another train headed to Flensburg.

IMG_20180801_204850.jpgLooks like a nice city. Too bad we had to leave right away.

There, we switched trains again and finally, way past midnight, arrived in Kolding.

IMG_20180802_084442.jpg
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2018-08-02 08.48.29.jpgSome pictures of Kolding, that I took the next morning.

Our host, Mikkel, who we found via couch surfing picked us up at the station. I’m still amazed that he did that, he also had already prepared our bed and offered some food. We soon went to sleep, as the train on the next day would leave at 9 in the morning.

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I'm glad to hear Couchsurfing is still working. I'm not that happy with Airbnb.

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It is, but it's super hard to find a host. We were forced to opt for airbnb in Budapest and Florence, because nobody answered our messages :/

This is, at least in Germany, a common story told by beggars (one guy in my city has been asking me for money for his ticket home since I moved there), but I chose to believe them in this case.

I think this is pretty common everywhere. Money for return tickets, petrol, that sort of thing. Sometimes they'll have something to "trade" or "sell" which is pitifully broken or worthless. For some reason I think the idea of someone being stranded tugs at our heartstrings a little more than usual. Extra points for having a couple of hungry and scared-looking kids with them.

It works on me, I guess. I usually give them the money... unless I see the same person/family twice. No second helpings, sorry.

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For me, it highly depends on the context. Our city has a lot of "regulars", you just recognize them after a while. Some are super rude and/or pushy. Some, like the punks, compliment you, ask if you have some money for weed, and if you say no, they wish you a nice day and fuck off.

Thing is, I don't like to be lied to, and if I feel like someone who's asking me for money lies to me, I really don't want to give them money.

The punks got my spare change more than once.

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Great trip. I see you went to Slovenia too :)

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We did! Met three Steemians total! But ...

I'm looking forward to read your travel diary!
I think your donation of 7 euro will certainly bring you good karma on your way ;) It all comes back again and again ;)
Kindly greetings out of the van
Sarah

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We met a lot of great people, and there was so much that could have gone wrong but went right. So... I guess giving them the 7€ gave us a good start!

looks like a very cool trip.
Have great days and wish you all the best weather and relax time.

RivalzZz

Awesome . Can't wait for the next posts. I'm curious to see what you visited and experienced in Italy and Romania

@reggaemuffin and you there must have had pretty awesome time and I'm guessing there's even more pictures, Frankfurt seems cool, that's a lovely back pack

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It was a blast.
And lol, thanks. That backpack slowly started falling apart on the trip tho, it's quite old.

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Lol I guess you both packed very heavy that's why the bag back may be falling apart 😁😁

This series looks promising

I can't wait to see Part 11 or 12 (Slovenia) :)

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How do you know we were there :P Would be a later part tho, as I am going by day, not country.

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You showed the map :D

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That's exactly what his mom keeps saying.

Mmm... tits and food.

What a good day.

The architecture seems quite special in Kolding though. Not that it's bad but.. special.

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We encountered a lot of "Special" architecture. You'll see :P

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Well I can admit, it would be boring if you'd be posting a bunch of photos of plain walls or such.

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Asphalt.JPG

A picture I took in Greece, ca. 10 years ago

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The photo is.. well how to describe this.

It's not as impressive as your drawings are.

I admire how easier it is for you guys to travel so far on trains. That sorta railway network is yet to get here sadly.

I love your 'shoe game'. Your hair too!

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I bought these shoes specifically for the trip xD Light, easy to slip on and off, soft soles. They're not particularly pretty but comfy and practical.

Tbh, the European train network is amazing. I remember reading that the USA has a pretty shitty one, no idea how it looks like in Africa.

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I don't do pretty so to me they are lit as hell. Can I know how how much they go for on that end?

Europe is quite something when it comes to infrastructure. I think the States have something we don't in Africa though. Africa is still being run by roads mostly and a few world class airports and that's it. What we need most us what we don't have... A good railway network.

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I got them from one of the cheaper shoe shops that tend to sell knock-off brands. They were supposed to be 60€, but were 50% off (for comparison: I got a pair of original Dr. Martens for 120€).

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Damn. That's a lot on my end. Anyway, thank you for sharing :)

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Yeah, it's not super cheap (although 20-30€ is usually the cheapest you can go before the shoes are total shit). Different countries, different standards. Another thing that was very obvious on our trip, especially when it came to food.

Switzerland was so, so expensive.

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Maybe. Most of us in Africa usually live off the second hand shoes and that range of 20-30 is probably still high for most of us. But oddly there are those who can afford the 120 without a sweat. I think it's more of who, not where if you get what I mean.

I have always wanted to travel at some point in my life. How I will manage to budget for it is what freaks me out, lol. How do you deal with figuring out that food will cost you more at some point of your travel? What if you are working on a tight budget? Tricky

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One thing I highly recommend is visiting people. We had to pay for an airbnb twice, but aside from that stayed with Steemians or Couchsurfers (couchsurfing is free). This already saves a lot of cost, and if you're staying with friends, they might even include you in their daily cooking.

Aside from that, it helps to check how expensive different countries will be. While in Hungary, we re-stocked our "emergency food" (mainly cereal bars and dried fruit), because we knew that food prices there are ridiculously low (compared to most other countries).
If you google "food prices in country", you can usually get a breakdown somewhere of how high those are.

Before we entered Switzerland, we stocked up on cheap pasta and Pesto in Italy, to be able to cook. 6€ for 4 meals, basically.

In the end, it boils down to how much you can spend, you want to cook, if you want to eat out or see tourist attractions. We didn't enter many museums and mainly stuck to free activities.

Still, we love eating out, so most of our "free" budget (that wasn't tied up in transportation) was spent on food in restaurants.

Knowing how many calories you need can help ease your mind, we packed two bags of nuts, which would have provided enough kcal for a day - in case we would have run out of food for some reason.

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Lol. Africa? Not much. Our railway networks stopped functioning a long time ago. As soon as Africans realized they could get companies come in to mine crude oil and still pay them for mining it. So yeah, agriculture died. Well, almost died, along with the rail track projects that should have been completed today.

Welcome home 👍 after the long hectic trip hope to some interesting diary notes in coming days.....btw that kind of beggar i thoight was only happen in India...anyway you did the best...👍

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it an awesome expression ....keep sharing...more photos of your journey...

Greetings Suesa, very fun and adventurous your crossing

This is gonna be a fun series to read! Looking forward to the following installments. I love the pictures of buildings, always found arcetecture intresting.

Look at all those pretty buildings. I can't wait to see someplace totally new someday.