Where Steemit does it right

in steemit •  last year 

This is something that's been rolling around in the back of my head, especially since joining Steemit. It has to do with social media, and something that a lot more people stand to realize. And for me, it all started somewhere else.

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Tsu was a social network that billed itself as "the people's network." They shared 90% of their ad revenue with their users. I joined at the end of 2015, and quickly fell in love with the place. It's where I first met @TheCastle, when he posted a selfie of him with the Excalibur Statue in the Digital Extremes headquarters. It's where one of the comic artists for Deadpool told me my wife is a keeper because we went and saw the Deadpool movie for Valentines Day. A lot of really awesome people called Tsu home, and we were really sad when they shut down.

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It wasn't sustainable, but it taught me something very important. Your name is a brand. @ddrfr33k is a brand. The interests that you write about? That has value. Those selfies and food pics when you go eat out? They have value! At the same time, reposting content that you found online reduces that value. It makes for a very unique community, one that values content creators, and people who contribute to those who make.

There's always a few people who post spammy comments trying to make a quick buck, but it rarely if ever works out that way. Networks like this don't reward people who clog up the comments sections with bland, uninteresting replies.

I see something very similar in Steemit. We have content creators, truly inspiring people, who love what they do and love sharing it. They truly embody this Charles Bukowski quote:
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There are still the spam posters, but they are spotted quickly. Nobody cares about them, so I'm not going to waste any more breath on them. But everyone else? They care about the community. They want to see it flourish. I see Tsu, all over again, here on Steemit. And I love it! Long live Steemit!

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Wow this is quite eye-opening! Especially this:

"The interests that you write about? That has value. Those selfies and food pics when you go eat out? They have value! At the same time, reposting content that you found online reduces that value. It makes for a very unique community, one that values content creators, and people who contribute to those who make."

This has clarified for me why hanging out on Facebook is such as waste of my time and labor. Not only do I not get paid for it, they profit off my labor. And they expect me to pay them if I want my content to reach further.

Whereas, on Steem, my labor is honored through payments via upvoting. And the content here is deeper and richer anyways...

Bingo! It also explains why spamming and shitposting (which are pretty fun nonetheless) are pretty much worthless activities. But my one mistake with Tsu? I didn't engage other users enough. I didn't comment enough on other's posts, I didn't share others' posts enough. That's what did me in.

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cool! i was on TSU too... sad that it fell apart :-(

Ya know, for everything that happened to that network, it had a lot going for it.

Come to think of it, your name sounds familiar outside of Steemit... I think I might have followed you on there, too!

Thank you for the insight here @ddrfr33k. Curious as why that Tsu site closed down ?? Btw, Following you and look forward to some more good content in the future :)

I just realized I never replied to this post! Sorry about that!

I first heard about Tsu when facebook started blocking links to the site in October of 2015. Tsu had been around for almost a year at that point, and the business news outlets picked up this story because it looked like Facebook was blocking a competitor on the grounds of spam (turns out there were a whole lot of bots based out of Pakistan that were also flooding every social network they were on with tsu links). But Facebook wasn't the only site blocking them. I also found out that DeviantArt would block links to Tsu, as well.

The other issue they ran into was advertising. While they managed to pick up over 100 million users in about 2 years, how many of them would you imagine were running ad blocking software? Quite a few, I'd wager! That cut into their bottom line. They couldn't sustain themselves off of ad revenue. That was the final nail in Tsu's coffin.