7 Tips on Learning How to Code Faster

in steemdev •  10 months ago

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Introduction

Since I got started coding only 2 weeks and a half ago, I've been obsessed with making sure that I'm learning things right and as efficiently as possible. I want to maximize my learning curve as much as I can at this point.

To be honest, I don't really like when a person "pretends" to be an expert by giving tips. In my case, you can be confident that those tips are not from me...they are simply a compilation of what I found most helpful so far.

1. Start with Why

He who has a why to live can bear almost any how. - Frederic Nietzche

We are goal-oriented beings. Without an aim, we simply don't find the mental fortitude to go through the hours and hours of debugging...trying to figure out what's wrong with our simple code.

For quite a bit of time, we don't necessarily see the point of what we are learning. But for those of us that know their WHY, it is much easier to pull it off.

2. Set a Learning Plan - Begin With the End in Mind

With all the choices out there, it's easy to get lost and confused about what language to learn. It can become much clearer once you begin with the end in mind and work backward from there.

Once you have that you won't get distracted by people telling you should learn javascript when you are learning to write python or java. You'll know WHY you are learning java and why you shouldn't learn something else.

That plan should not just include classes, but also books, websites & podcasts. For me who want to become a front-end developer, this medium post was especially helpful => My journey to becoming a web developer from scratch without a CS degree (and what I learned from it)

Check it out if you have a similar goal than me.

3. Learn by Doing

New Color Monkey Flyer with Text.jpg

Practice, practice, practice. That's the only way I can ever imagine the number of concepts and syntax I've learned so far...and yet, I have so much more to learn!

It's all good to write a textbook or watch a video on how to code. But if we don't immediately start implementing what we've just learned, we are bound to forget that stuff.

Right now, I'm working on a to-do list app. It's been challenging to say the least but at least, I'm getting a lot of practice with the basic concepts that I've learned so far such as loops, arrays and functions...and that's what matters at this point.

4. Code by Hand

I tried this for the first time yesterday and it was an amazing exercise. Trying to figure out a problem from a to z with only pen and paper was challenging but now that I did it, I feel like it was a great way to dig deep in my brain and make sure I will remember what I've learned. (I did the to-do list on paper first before bringing it on the computer)

Try it out, it's pretty cool.

5. Don't Use Copy / Paste

Typing code can be exhausting sometimes and it gets repetitive. It is tempting to copy/paste the basics of an HTML file for the nth time rather than typing it by hand.

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
</head>
<body>
</body>
<html>

But by doing it again and again, it drills the syntax into your brain so that you retain it better and also understand the syntax better and better.

6. Master the Fundamentals

I see a lot of people telling me that I should jump on a framework(react.js for example) and start getting stuff done as soon as possible. But what I am getting from a lot of great coders is the emphasis on learning the fundamentals and mastering them. Once that is done, it will be easy for me to understand better how and why frameworks works (react.js, angular,js, etc). I never want to be a prisoner of a framework and having to relearn everything when react.js is not cool anymore.

I intend to have a continued education in Javascript for years to come by reading books such as Eloquent Javascript or You Don't Know JS when I'm done with the basics and starting to learn frameworks.

7. Get Help!

This one I haven't actually implemented. I know that there are many meetup groups where people hangout and code together. There are online forums, stackoverflow.com and many more places where we can interact with one another to get better. A mentor or working side by side with an experienced coder would definitely help me at this point.

Conclusion

Would it be nice to have a group of steem devs and aspiring ones working together and chatting? Anyway, feel free to share your tips if you are already a dev and correct me if some of my assumptions are wrong.

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@cryptoctopus,
You are 100% correct! Being a coder or a developer will not happen in a single day! People can only see UI or interface and they only want to "Click" buttons! But behind that buttons there are a lot of functions, methods, classes and etc! No one cares about them, but only developer cares!
What you shared as 7 steps, I really like and I think I want to follow them also. End result must be the genuine developer! Great work friend! Keep it up!

Cheers~

You're right, start with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. Don't ever become a prisoner of one specific form of feature. Let the tools work for you, never the other way around.

A salute to all the coders in the world because they gave courage the new meanings :)

Learning curve is best when you applied what you learn. It is not only for being a coder, but this rule is one of the most important one in life is to know your "WHY". Tnx for sharing your insights.

These tips are mostly transferable to almost anything you attempt to do. Although the hand coding is an exception ;)

The first point is really important, because your "why" is your motivator, and must be bigger than any obstacle or frustration you may face.

Regular hacking away at code is the best way to learn. Unless you actually implement what you study it won't cement in your brain. When I began mirc script years ago I regularly worked on scripts with a pen and notebook while at work. This combined with later typing in what I had pen coded earlier really helped me.

I have found that having a mentor is a big help.

Another thing that has always helped me is a simple maxim:

Read code, not books.

The code others have written is often the most effective teacher. Tutorials and books teach concepts and that is important. Another coders work teaches you how someone else solved a complex problem and that is often invaluable.

Thanks for the post.

Keep Steeming!

Finally I was looking forward to you showing us the baby steps and real steps towards coding . I’m still part of the baby steps but I’m learning from different sources. The most difficult part for me is the language which really confuses me and I think youtube has helped me a lot in that too. I’m better at when I see things done than read it

@cryptoctopus
I'm not a dev but i can tell say I have been equipped a little from this post.
I have to practice practice and practice by hand not by copy/paste.
Practice makes perfect, if we keep practice while looking at the end not the beginning we gonna have a nice time learning.

Yes - having the core fundamentals will help you when things get frustrating. I think having a community which you mentioned in a prior post is important as well. Motivation is the only way to learn this stuff.

Noted about the copy/paste coding style. I foresee that this will be a pitfall for me as i will start the Bootcamp. Thanks for reminding me sire! :D

If i need some help, i will contact you asap. :)

It'd be great if you can also make a post about different programming languages and their pros and cons. That'd really help picking a language to learn that match a person't end goals.

Thanks for the great post. Reteemed.

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You're so nice for commenting on this post. For that, I gave you a vote!

I face this problem sometimes.... u missed 'concentration' while writing code in text editor.

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Try and check semicolon missing somewhere.......... ;)

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Found it on your reply :D

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Amazing, I expected exactly the same... Great dear You deserve 100 %

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Thanx for the article! I'm starting to learn Java coding and exactly the same principles of mastering the Java language was messaged to us by our Mentor - "Practice, Practice, Practice". I see it as the key recipe for success just for any activity!!!

This will help you a lot

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hahahha VeryTrue :) :) I face the same many times

I'm not a coder and had no plans to learn it until I saw these motivational coding monkeys:

Last time, I tried learning it for free was through a a blog post at Mashable but I'm unable to find that post now. The course was #4 in the list and it was very easy to learn coding but I'm ashamed to share that I failed to complete it:
[43 Classes You Can Take Right Now to Advance Your Career (and They’re Free!)]

Sharing because it might help someone.

Excellent job @cryptoctopus.

Steem On!

I remember when I started learning how to program at high school- there was a fancy room with shiny computers but they wouldn't let us in! Instead we sat and wrote down in plain language what are the stages we need to implement, what is the way to do it - again, in every day language, then write the code down with pen and paper, and only then we entered the computers room and began trying to do things on a compiler.
That's was frustrating - we were eager to get programs running and become hackers as fast as a lightning, because you always imagine yourself sitting in front of a computer with green pines runing down the screen.
Today I know why they did it, and I thank them - being in a hurry is just going to make you slow - one might try things he just can't do yet and it can really take the motivation to the floor!

So fellas, stick to the tips cryptoctopus provides here- I can vouch from my own experience (which isn't much :) that they are almost mandatory in the way to success!

yhis considered the tips very good especially for beginners in the field
Yes, it is a complicated area, but with some advice and experience in the field, it will be somewhat simple
Thank you again


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what type of coding this is? any software required?? @salahchiva

Great tips to follow it...
When I was managing developers (before source control) I occasionally had a disasters where work was lost. A programmer might have spent a week working on something, and for some reason all that work has gone. They were beside themselves with grief. And they knew it would take another week to re-do all the work.
Except it didn't.
Usually it took a day, to redo the work. And often the re-done version was cleaner and better.

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That's a helpful tip in itself, making sure you're on top of your version control is essential to making sure you avoid disasters like that.

What sup bro! I decided, too, to get into this world, it has been quite difficult though but "no pain" we are not allowed to give up! This is the course I'm using it's free and complete, Cheers! https://upskillcourses.com/

@cryptoctopus, this really great, I had to write it down literally I was motivated by your last post so i enrolled for an html and CSS class, when am done I will add JavaScript to it, am waiting impatiently to see the result of your journey into the coding world

With this tips we should move at real speed
Nice post

thank you @cryptoctopus for the help you bring us with your advice.
So you are one of those strong and motivational elements that for many young steemians like me are essential.
It's really nice to share these tips so that everyone can enjoy and fully enjoy the potential offered to them.
Take Care

P&U

Thanks a lot for your post sharing us, all the best my dear

Wow, thanks

Learning code is always useful
what your career ambition are.

Waiting for you first application for steemit.

I can not code I do know HTML and did a lot in Visual basic.. and basic.. like 30+ years ago.. got 10. and if a + 20 = 40 then go to line 30 and so on.. also did a bit of C++ was screwed after week 6... ( But yes I did make a pretty app) not it will not make me rich... but here is what I want to say.. and this has always been at me... why not program in stages, and if some one wants to make a new feature for a program / software it could be added ass a stage / addon.. plugin... is it not better if people can make addons or stuff to just like melt into to a excisting software... fuk I am so out it.. this is already here right and I am just talking shit right..

More importance needs to be given to the fifth tip;

5: Don't Use Copy / Paste

Coding is very practical... For a newbie is wise and best to always write the codes yourself, this way you learn faster.
Am learning from the tutorial you shared yesterday, its quite tricky but am not giving up anytime soon. Thanks for the encouragement and motivation @cryptoctopus


Keep Steeming

good job freinds

really helpfull post

@cryptoctopus Wow Jerry that was a lot of work, thank you!
I will check them out when I get home this evening and can sit down and read.

I think many of these points could be applied to anything that a person is trying to learn! It's definitely so important to have that "why" so that you have an end goal and aren't just drifting aimlessly! Good points.

Much of this is really solid advice here. But the most important thing is that you need to wanna learn in order to learn. If you have passion it will be much easier

thanks for sharing this tips it helps me to learn coding easily great post upvoted and resteemed

Wow, thanks for this. After reading this, I'm convinced in the next 3 month I will be an expert

Practical tip. Thanks for sharing.

Dawm you rock!!! 🤘

Good tips man!

How much time do you think a newbie needs to start from zero and achieve a good level of understanding?

Thank you.I am learning from you guys
-cheers-

Good plans = Great goals

Actually writing down the code on paper...that's interesting!! Never thought of that.

I quite agree with you that STEEM is revolutionary because it is decentralized and open. Thank you for your article about steemit. I'm waiting for your next post.

thank you for sharing. I am a student of mechatronics engineering. and we are constantly coding. I would like to state that I participated in your thoughts.

You have some great tips in this post! I started programming in C, not the friendliest language to start with.. I spent hours creating databases from scratch with it, and since then I have always found any other language to be easy to pick up, due to how hard the language I started with was!

We could create a discord group to train newbies like me on how to code

I really got interested in coding with your post about it

The mastering the fundamentals bit really resonates with me, I have done things in the past but it was usually on top of someone else's work with the justification in my mind that there was no need to reinvent the wheel. While for some use cases that is correct, but you are also correct, once something happened and the kit i was coding on top of was gone, so was my work and knowledge.

It would be cool to have a chatroom or something, maybe other people agree.

Great post Budddy :)

Cuz a lot information sharing with us

@Resteem.jpg

Very interesting article and a research revealed 10,000 hours required to be an expert in a subject.

The theory of 10,000-hour expertness law by the famous psychologist K. Anders Ericson, researched how the persons gain expertness in their area of interest and found the theory of 10000 hours has to utilise.

Thank you for the great information. These makes me want to learn coding. @originalworks

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The @OriginalWorks bot has determined this post by @cryptoctopus to be original material and upvoted it!

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To call @OriginalWorks, simply reply to any post with @originalworks or !originalworks in your message!

Please note that this is a BETA version. Feel free to leave a reply if you feel this is an error to help improve accuracy.

I am a huge admirer of your write up and i am convinced that you have finest ability to motivate others.

Great Blog , Stay blessed!

In every walk of life practice is the way which makes impossible to possible, you are so powerful and genius to provide us every information about coding faster and safe. Thanks for the great tips.

I think this is why we learn better in experiencing it firsthand. As the saying goes "experience is the best teacher"

I'm still not successful, because I do not understand. But I always try to give my best, trying to get people interested. Thank you for your advice and inspiration @cryptoctopus.

Greetings me from Aceh, Indonesia.

Excellent advice on practical programming and I learned a lot about the frames from this source, look, maybe this will be useful for you. Thank you @cryptoctopus
https://www.upwork.com/hiring/development/angularjs-basics/

listen music to relax while programing

yes, your points valid for most of the time when we started to learn a new skill. And coding is a art and it helps us to think differently. We should encourage young generation to learn coding as it will enhance their analytical thinking.
Thank you @cryptoctopus for your valuable points.
Cheers!

Nice article....;and with autocompletion you don't need to put all the syntax in your brain :-p

Coding is very boring work to do.
But you expalin it very nicely and in an easy way.
Thanks for sharing.
Lets get connected.
@qami

I got a c ++ course in college. my department is electrical and electronics engineering. I headed more to the electric forehead. but I have little knowledge of coding. I wanted to improve myself in writing code. it was good for me to come across this article. I will do it. I will learn and believe by typing. I hope succeeded. Thank you for helping me to be motive @cyrptoctopus

As a student of computer science, I would like for people to stress on point 5.

I was lazy and used to copy and paste a lot, but stupid syntax errors cost me a lot more time!

It's no surprise that my results improved when I decided to stop using copy and paste so much.

The easiest way to learn a language or technology stack is through developing a project that everyone can use with this language or technology stack. A piece of program that no one else has used is silent. The programmer does not provide feedback. Since the worse is not a problem, the programmer does not care. The headless programmer does not travel to the depths of the iceberg. So it is absolutely necessary to get feedback from users. In a very short time they will determine the direction of the course. Since the desires and complaints are not over, the programmer has to constantly solve the problem. In this way, you have to dive into the depths of the programming language or technology you are using. Learning and domination in a real sense starts from this point.. @cryptoctopus
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Those are very helpful tips for someone like me who still refuses to dig in with coding. I always find it difficult to learn the basics but now I know what should I be doing. It's a step by step process though and nothing can be learn in an instant. I want to see more about java development and maybe if you can, maybe like sql :)

Great and valuable post.
Truly, brilliant!!

Thanks @cryptoctopus for sharing this post.☺

Upvoted + Resteemed your post.

Love reading these updates. I think this series has me as interested as the series you did on your account site rating.

Once again this is something I'm interested in and dabbled in the past and to see someone make it happen and learn from their mistakes will be good for me.

All valuable advice and I think the mistake I made when I was dabbling is too much copying and pasting.

I am a website developer and I know the coding @cryptoctopus sir,and I am totally agree with you sir"practice is only the key to success in coding",I have my own experience that whenever I stop coding for long time,I have to start from the scratch but If I do coding regularly I code it perfect,I really appreciate your hard work of learning and all your points are very important to be good in coding.Udemy is best website to learn coding,and I know some of good you tube videos that are best to learn coding like html,css,bootstrap,javascript,jquery and many more.One small request sir I am upvoting you regulary and also add you in steemauto but I am not getting upvotes from you sir,Please support me sir.I really apologize If I had said something wrong,Upvoted and resteemed,I hope you will reply sir.

This is a nice list of tips. Since there are many different guides out there for practically any coding language, it's not hard to find information that will help. I am curious what languages you are learning? I personally know a bit of C++, Java and Android and am working on learning JavaScript.
One of the best resources Iv'e found has been www.stackoverflow.com.
The people there are very knowledgeable and you can likely find someone who has worked on the same project you are working on and has posted their own code. I'm not telling anyone this to say they can copy/paste someone elses code,(Just like your guide there says, copy/pasting won't help you learn anything),
only to say that,if you have a project you are stuck on, those guys can not only give yo advice but you can see real working code and compare it to how your code is. Lots of times, you will see a solution in the posted code to your problem before you ever have to ask a question.

I'm doing the same course as you are. It's been the only course that I've attempted that really focuses on the fundamental concepts and building on earlier projects and removes learning for the sake of just learning.

I've also tried codeschool, but I lost track of the 'why' half way through as the emphasis on projects wasn't strong. Really like the idea of coding by pen before actually typing it out. I'll try to incorporate that in my learning.

One more tip that really helped me is by looking at the html and css code on different sites that I really liked. Most of the time I don't understand all of it, but it helps cultivate good design focused learning.

What also helps me is to set an achievable target of how many topics to cover in a particular week. To lower the expectations when I know it's going to be a busy week, and to increase the goal when during a week which has public holidays.

Anyways, all the best with the learning! I hope to share my progress too.

Very good step by step tutorial, especially with a question why do you do that, what is your main purpose and what you actually plan to achieve. I think it is the most important question in any field, whether it is marketing, finance or design. Nice inspirational article.

Bookmarked for the Future when i actually start to learn.
Nice ones.

That's some great advice right there. You're doing one of the most important things and that's having a side project. Something you want to see finished and you can keep learning on. This is a big motivation boost.

You should definitely blog about your progress learning to code. Especially document what you've learned every day you sat down to code. I think that's one of the best ways to motivate yourself, as it show's what your progress has been. This comes in helpful when you're in doubt if you really made any progress in the last days/weeks and trust me, you will be in doubt every now and then. But then you just go back to your public journal so to speak and remind yourself that there have been lots of things you learned.

Anyhoo, keep at it!

Gracias por tus consejos amigos, mu buenos, un saludo desde Venezuela:)

@cryptoctopus Hello friend, good morning, I learned through Coursera that it is a web page that teaches you different types of courses in my house. It was with Python programming which helped me a lot but I learned more about practice than theory because when I you practiced without reading the theory because sooner or later you learned what code I did to do such a thing or action and I believe in the most personal sense that it is one of the best ways to learn, by the way, good post bro ^^

Typing code can be exhausting sometimes and it gets repetitive. It is tempting to copy/paste the basics of an HTML file for the nth time rather than typing it by hand.

But by doing it again and again, it drills the syntax into your brain so that you retain it better and also understand the syntax better and better.

I've been following your daily coding posts and tips and I must say I've really learnt a lot.
The above tips is what I've really taken into heart today and I'll try to adhere to it since it'll help to improve my coding skills.

I'm about signing up on udemy too as I know it'll help me greatly.


Thanks for sharing this tips with us, mentoring and inspiring beginning coders. God bless you.

Happy Steeming

It's really depend on concentration, Need to 100% concentration over it . Nice article man , I appreciate it , @cryptoctopus

@cryptoctopus...really a nice tips to learn easily..everyone get struggles to write a perfect code easily..it a very hard to write a some codes ..with out excellent sillks and also without experience..in the way of learning said by you is very helpfull to learn easily..really a wonderfull way ..the main problem with a code running is complie time and a running time and errors ..if the person who overcome these errors ..he is a perfet coder..thank you for sharing with us...

For me, personally, having a goal is always hardest. I mean I know I want to learn code better, and I can read like the best of em, but I usually have no goal towards what to learn, I think that's one of the biggest pieces of advice one can have. Set a goal (project) on what you want to use the accumulated coding knowledge for. It's 'targeted' learning which will help immensely.

Not using copy paste and practice, rinse, repeat are also very valuable things to do when trying to master code. We learn through repetition.

And lastly, for me, having someone around to ask things would be so helpful. Especially when something doesn't work. It's helpful if someone would explain WHY it doesn't work, but maybe that's just how my brain ticks, needing to understand the why.

I'm going to read back some on your posts, because I kinda want to make some steemchain related webpages as well (mostly for my own benefit, querying data and such) and God knows I need to brush up on my HTML & CSS if I want to do that.

your idea is very nice. I like your proposal and love your idea @cryptoctopus

What you describe is really true, I have applied it since 1991, your idea with 7 tips is work fully . I think today is much easier in coding computer commands because all syntax has been encased in a syntax module. Maybe you laugh if I say that I've been done coding on the basic interpreter system, green screen computer, ram 640 kb. machine 8086, dos ver.1 (before MS-DOS), then move to 80x86 machine ... hehehe ... no hard drive my friend. We use the assembly programming language 8086, cobol, fortran77, basica, pascal, and others at that time. to write our program code script using coding form, then write it to the machine using EDLIN and SIDEKICK. yaa... little bit funny.

Is that all boring ...? not at all, because I love what I do. The coding of a computer system is an incredible art. When hear blcokchain can not be on heck, can we explain it?, or when we find a piece of human tooth that has been destroyed, can we see his face?, are we still need to keep our identity card in the wallet?, for this times I don't think so. upon that times I have never steal someone else's property to enrich myself, but today, a hacker's mentality has gone downhill by stealing people's money. our ability is only used to stack up anythings as a hard warning without destroy them.

I'm very glad you raised this topic, like returning me to college that I've been through. good luck my friend, you will be great analyst and computer's programming at future times.

See you.

Your publications at the level always benefit from them. keep it up ♥ following you ♥

Thx again for a nice update again. I agree that you have to type.. copy and paste makes you lazy and you don't see what is actually is wrong. It's like training your brain to see code..

Didn't know about Eloquent Javascript book from the medium post you've linked to. Looks like what I was searching for, thank you.

@cryptoctopus very well shared.1-2 very important to start learning coding.3-4-5 important to improve self.Thanks for sharing..

WAO is incredible to see EP basic process of programmer, I think the idea is great to educate in Group I am an aspiring with all the desire to learn and if I would like to take this challenge in your trip programmer

To learn anything we must have a learning plan and proper implementation of that plan. Practice is must to make things work properly because we are human beings not machines and human beings cant retain 100% from what we have learned so its practice that makes a man perfect. I totally agree with your all 7 basic steps, but one advice from me, start participating in contests of programmers you will get to learn a lot from there. Keep going. Have a nice day.

Here is a good free resource for coding challenges and instruction: https://www.hackerrank.com/

We are goal-oriented beings. Without an aim, we simply don't find the mental fortitude to go through the hours and hours of debugging...trying to figure out what's wrong with our simple code.

Having a goal in mind is what keeps every sane person going. Programming isn't easy at all but with the right mindset and your goal in mind you can overcome and stay strong whenever you are faced with any debugging issue.

Happy to know that there are tons of people who tries to learn coding despite of not having a formal background about computer programming. Hope you post some of your findings about web development in the future, looking forward to learn from there. Also I want to say that I do some tutorials about programming although I focus more on desktop application developments. Feel free to check it out, however the tutorial series have just started

Advance C# Programming with MongoDB
Csharp Tutorial Road to a Finished System [Introduction]
Csharp Tutorial Road to a Finished System [Hello World]

well more good to give tips and your ideas with all who want to learen first of all i think stick on your aim with correct attitude and after more more pracitic is compulsory thing for learen coding adn also the (practice make a man more perfect) and that thing the html code or any other which mostly use copy paste is not better way type it again and again make your work more good,,,
and the big thing its my own experience that note any thing on paper is good way to put any thing in our mind for always ...any way first of all stick on your aim is more important @cryptoctopus

Many thanks to my friend for this post
I needed to immediately learn coding as soon as I needed it :)

Learn by doing seems to be the best way to go about this honestly.

Would it be nice to have a group of steem devs and aspiring ones working together and chatting?

You can start a project just like a #photofeed, ask every newbie like you and me in the programming world to share what they have learned today. We can create a whole stackoverflow.com like website here on Steemit.
Let me know if it sounds good to you, I'll be available to you start this project!

@cryptoctopus - Sir I don't have a knowledge about coding, but with your inspiration I'll try to learn what's actually behind it... I know Sir, you are new to coding, but you have the idea... Moreover Sir you got the road-map of to be a good developer... Therefore, what you shared today is valuable thing to people who wish to follow your steps... Keep it up Sir... This is the blog of your successful story... One day your child will read it & will proud of you...

+W+

You have excellent training. You have talent, so everything is clearly described. Thank you very much.

It would be really cool if people would share their best resource for learning how to code. Here's mine
Udacity.com
Loads of free super high quality courses. I am doing the python on at the moment.

Do you have a favorite place to learn coding?

Dear, @cryptoctopus, all these seven tips are must for anybody who wants to learn how to write code. The learning plan is the best tip, and don't forget to practice every day. Try to think the problem and solve them on your own with your coding.

As with @aweber's tips to becoming a good photographer, I appreciate that these are good tools for optimizing any skill, not just coding. It can be easy to forget that expertise is often the product of tedium, and you can't really get the expertise without dragging through the tedium first.

be a coder is a hard task. only coder knows what he did, we can say goods or bad by watching the surf. your pattern of be a good developer is a great task. congratulations for the successes you made so far. @cryptoctopus

@resteemia
reteemed & upvoted & commented & followed

Wow! Thanks for the info. I realize how much I do not know about coding.

I believe coding by hand is a very undeestimated way to learn. It really forces you to think things through before writing. Also, it forces you to manually write those parts you would normally copy, thus complying with your fifth point;)

Here is my opinion. It worths for what it worths.

Tips 6, 3 and 4 are the most important I guess, although the others matter as well. To come back to 6, don't jump to a framework, and build your own instead. This is how you will develop your expertise and actually feel it.

Note the typo in tip 5: < /html > (the slash is missing) :p

This applies to a lot more than just coding. Thank you for sharing it.

Being in a new year, it is reminder to start with the basics as I progress throughout 2018.

Why am I doing this? Is there a valid reason (a big enough reason) for me to go through this? In all honesty, is it something I really want?

Questions like that make us focus upon what it is before us. So many pursue something simply because they think they want it. In the end, upon reaching the goal, then they are like, its nice but it doesnt do much for me.

Of course, I found that goals like you are referring to, learning something, is a lot more beneficial than an item. Getting a new car is nice but it is only new for a couple months. A raise at work is a raise for two weeks, then it is part of the paycheck.

So I need to ask why more often.