Polygala - colour me MauvesteemCreated with Sketch.

in polygala •  2 months ago

I thought it was Purple, but they say it's Mauve or sometimes Pink. Polygala myrtifolia is sometimes called by the common names "Milkwort" or "Sweet Pea Bush". This time of year in Sydney, there are some nice examples of this plant to see around. This is a fast growing , medium sized shrub, growing up to 2 metres, and it puts on a glorious display of Mauve flowers. It is best planted in full sun and suited for temperate or warm climates. There are some dwarf hybrids available which are suitable for either pots or garden planting, and some prefer these as the regular variety is considered a weed in some places.

These photos were taken in Sydney's Nothern Suburbs. new7 107.jpgnew7 106.jpgnew7 108.jpg

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Polygala of the milkwort family is a genus featuring over 500 species of plants (annuals, herbaceous perennials, subshrubs and shrubs) which are widely distributed in warm to temperate regions throughout the world. Plants are generally noted for having alternate lanceolate leaves and pea-like often showy flowers in terminal clusters/racemes.

Polygala x dalmaisiana, commonly called sweet pea bush or milkwort, is a loose, leggy, fast-growing, rounded to spreading, bushy evergreen shrub which typically grows to 3-5’ tall and as wide. It is reportedly a hybrid between two South African species (P. opposistifolia and P. myrtifolia). Stems are clad with ovate dull green leaves (1” long). Terminal racemes of rose-magenta pea-like flowers with two winged petals surrounding a white purple crest bloom summer to frost, but bloom extends to almost year round in mild frost-free climates with minimum temperatures of 40 degrees F. Flowers resemble those of sweet pea.

Genus name comes from the Greek words polys meaning much and gala meaning milk in reference to a belief dating back to the medieval era that ingestion of plant leaves by certain nursing mammals resulted in increased milk production.

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=362665&isprofile=0&

Polygala myrtifolia varies in form as it changes to adapt to the different areas it grows in, from the harshness of the coast to the drier inland climates. An evergreen shrub, the most common forms reach about 0.6 to 1.8 m in height with a few upright-growing stems and slender branches densely covered with leaves that resemble myrtle. The oval-shaped leaves are usually 25-50 mm long and up to 13 mm wide. The leaves are light green, dark green or slightly grey. Some forms of P. myrtifolia have thin, needle-like leaves. It can also grow into a small tree reaching almost 4 m high.

The buds are green, flat, marked with dark veins and oval to half-moon-shaped. The lower buds open first. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal. All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring ( August to October) when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule.

http://pza.sanbi.org/polygala-myrtifolia

@ctrl-alt-nwo,
Wow it's really stunning! The flower looks like an Orchid but with that bush type it's perfect for gardening! Great photography and description! I didn't see this plant in my country! if it's here, it might get a lot of attention from people who loves gardening!

Cheers~

Sweet Pea Bush

To our many customers who have enjoyed the flowering delights of the Sweet Pea Bush (Polygala) and who might well be wondering how to look after this beautiful perennial over winter, read on.
Well as with most things there is no right answer in terms of protection, much depends on the severity of the winter. If your Sweet Pea bush is potted try to move it to the most sheltered part of the garden ideally up against the house, this should offer reasonable protection from the worst of the winter winds, frosts and snow.

If your Sweet Pea bush is planted out, hopefully you remembered to provide a well-drained environment, this above all else will help to keep the Sweet Pea in good shape through the colder months.
The last three winters have been quite mild and haven’t really troubled the Sweet Pea Bush especially here in the South of the UK, but if we do see a very cold winter, wrapping the Sweet Pea bush in hessian or fleece would certainly be beneficial.

Come Spring give the Sweet Pea bush a light prune to keep its rounded shaped and prevent a woody habit.

https://www.athelasplants.co.uk/sweet-pea-bush/

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Silly Sausage Award !! Well done , nice selection of Pics.

These are very impressive huge balls of purple flowers!
Lots of fun in these deep colour petals!
I will have to look around here if we have this plant in Thailand.

An attractive evergreen shrub that grows up to 2 meters, the September bush is able to adapt to most garden situations. It is fast growing, making it especially useful for new gardens. Polygala myrtifolia in the wild varies in form according to its habitat and distribution. In some areas it is a tough, loosely branched plant with relatively small, narrow leaves, while in others it is denser with larger, softer leaves. It flowers best in full sun, really dry conditions, poor soil and the least possible care - see natural habitat in photograph 6 above. Good in wild gardens, very dry gardens and exclusion zones.

The September bush will grow in most soil types. Polygala myrtifolia needs very little watering once established. It can be lightly pruned to shape, which encourages a more bushy habit and will keep it within bounds. Left to itself, growth is a bit more lax. Fewer flowers are produced in shady spots. Useful in areas that change from full sun in summer to semi- or full shade in winter.

Source: https://kumbulanursery.co.za/plants/polygala-myrtifolia

Very good-looking flowers there @ctrl-alt-nwo and they do resemble like a flowering pea pod. The color is beautiful with its purple shade.

This South African shrub to 2 m high is widely naturalised across southern Australia and has become invasive in coastal areas. These shrubs are most readily recognised by their mauve-purple, pea-shaped flowers produced throughout most of the year, predominantly during spring. Flowers develop two-celled flattened seed capsules that ripen from green to papery brown. Whilst the plainer form with greenish lower petals is frequently observed as weedy, the showier cultivar 'Grandiflora' with larger flowers and purple lower petals has also been observed readily spreading from plantings.

http://www.growmeinstead.com.au/plant/polygala.aspx

Congratulations @ctrl-alt-nwo!
Your post was mentioned in the Steemit Hit Parade in the following category:

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Great, thankyou !

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Polygala myrtifolia, the myrtle-leaf milkwort, is an evergreen 2-4m tall South African shrub or small tree found along the southern and south-eastern coasts, from near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape to KwaZulu-Natal. It is a fast-growing pioneer plant, a typical fynbos component, and may be found on dunes, rocky places, along forest margins, beside streams, and in open grassland. It belongs to the milkwort family of Polygalaceae.
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The thin, oval, mucronate leaves, 25–50 mm long and up to 13 mm wide, are arranged alternately and have entire margins - some forms of P. myrtifolia have thin, needle-like leaves. The attractive mauve sweetpea-like flowers, which close at night, may also be pink, crimson or white, and have a characteristic brush-like tuft protruding from the keel. For pollination an intricate piston mechanism is used. The fruit is an oval, brown, dehiscent capsule which is narrowly winged. The species is often cultivated in South African gardens.
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The genus of Polygala comprises some 360 species with a wide distribution in the tropics and temperate zones. 'Polygala' is interpreted as 'much milk' since the plant was thought to stimulate milk production in European cows - 'myrtifolia' translates as 'myrtle-shaped leaves'.
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This species has become naturalised in some of the coastal areas of Australia, Norfolk Island, New Zealand and California.
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Sweet pea shrub

Other common names
sweet pea shrub

Family
Polygalaceae

Genus
Polygala can be annuals, evergreen perennials or shrubs, with simple leaves and racemes of somewhat pea-shaped flowers.

Details
P. x dalmaisiana is a bushy evergreen shrub to 1.5m, with dark green, ovate leaves and terminal racemes of pea-like, reddish-purple flowers 2.5cm long, in summer and autumn.

https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/56000/Polygala-x-dalmaisiana/Details

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Polygala is a large genus of flowering plants belonging to the family Polygalaceae. They are commonly known as milkworts or snakeroots. The genus is distributed widely throughout much of the world[1] in temperate zones and the tropics.[2] The genus name Polygala comes from the ancient Greek "much milk", as the plant was thought to increase milk yields in cattle.
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Polygala includes annual and perennial plants, shrubs, vines, and trees.[1] The roots often have a scent reminiscent of wintergreen.[2] The leaf blades are generally undivided and smooth-edged, and are alternately arranged in most species. The inflorescence is a raceme or spikelike array of several flowers; the occasional species bears solitary flowers.
Polygala_myrtifolia_1.jpg
The flower is bilateral in shape, with two large petal-like sepals on the sides, often called the "wings",[2] and three smaller sepals behind. There are three petals in shades of reddish purple, yellow or white, which are joined at the bases. The lower of the three is the keel petal, which is "boat-shaped, cucullate [hood-like], or helmet-shaped.
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The lower of the three is the keel petal, which is "boat-shaped, cucullate [hood-like], or helmet-shaped".[1] The keel petal may have a beak or a fringe on the tip.[2] Stamens and style are within the curve of the keel petal. The fruit is a capsule, sometimes winged. It contains 2 seeds[1] which are usually black, hairy and tipped with a large white aril.[2] One polygala is the Fringed Polygala, found in coniferous forests.
1200px-Polígala_de_hoja_de_mirto_(Polygala_myrtifolia),_Setúbal,_Portugal,_2012-05-08,_DD_02.jpgp little bibi 008.jpg
(Source)https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygala.

Very interesting petals of this plant. I wonder what function does the white bristle on the edge of the central petal perform? This is an open pistil and stamens?
You surprise every time with new colors for me! Thank you!

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Yes they are the reproductive part of the flower. They are designed to rub on the bees backs, legs etc when they go to the flower. That way, the bees can polinate other flowers as they travel between plants. Nature's smart design !

Very beautiful plants. The first photo is amazing. Your photos are better and better with every time.

You shared wonderful photography among us and your last photo was really nice. Your last photo impressed me. I saw a lot of photography, but your photography has been so beautiful and I would like to thank you for sharing the flowers I really love it

They looks super elegant nice to have around for sure thanks for sharing about this :)

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Polygala myrtifolia "Riviersonderend" is a miniature form of the well-known Polygala myrtifolia. Hardy, evergreen, drought-resistant shrublet growing to only 1m tall. It has bright-green, broadly-lanceolate leaves.

The magenta flowers are borne in lax terminal heads throughout summer and autumn, and attract Carpenter Bees, butterflies and other tiny, pollinating insects to the garden. The seeds are relished by Laughing Doves.

This handsome compact form is an ideal alternative for the garden that is too small for the large tree-like form of the Polygala myrtifolia. A useful garden and container plant.

Prune regularly. Enjoys well-composted soil in a sunny or lightly shaded position.

Size: up to 100cm
Wildlife:
Uses:
Distribution:
Coastal areas - Western Cape

source

@ctrl-alt-nwo, Third picture is truly speaking the beauty of this plant and it's flowers. And genuinely speaking these kind of plants and those flowers which spreading the colourful essence in Environment will going to make our outer experience so pure and organic.

And whenever we see the Plantation in row specially plantation in row but different and diversified plants gives the breathtaking essence, and it also encourage others to do Home Based Plantation.

Wishing you an great day and stay blessed. 🙂

so many flowers I haven´t eben seen in Australia. Good inspiration to plant some new things in the Garden of my friends! They look great

wow...that was a cool flower crowded with beatiful flowers i love it!😍😍

Looks the same shape but that flower is more beautiful than mineIMG_20180901_233633.JPG

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Yours looks like a Lasiandra.

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can i look what Lasiandra is,you have any of it sir?

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lasiandra is same plant as Tibouchina. I did a few posts a while ago on it. You can look back in my blog and see.

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oh..i never saw your post just online back to steemit because my phone data storage are all used up..i'll check it right away..thank you sir.

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I did not saw the flower you mean..but this flower of yours took my attention the leaves are the on my flowers..

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I'm happy you like them :)

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if we are talking about flowers hhmmm...i would surely love it,and i'm happy to see other flowers from other country..by the way,thanks for sharing those flowers around your country..

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No problem my friend.

Myrtle-leaf milkwort (Polygala myrtifolia) has been widely cultivated as a garden ornamental, particularly in the temperate regions of Australia. The typical form of the species is generally no longer cultivated, but a modern cultivar (i.e. Polygala myrtifolia 'Grandiflora') is now widespread in cultivation. This cultivar was thought to be sterile, but it has recently been found to set some seed.
ba7ba5500ebaa897db1b5ed084e24bc9.jpg

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sources
Polygala-murt-Grandifolia-Flowers.jpg
source
Widely naturalised in the coastal districts of southern Australia (i.e. in the coastal districts of eastern New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, southern South Australia and south-western Western Australia). Less common in the sub-coastal and inland regions of Victoria, South Australia and south-western Western Australia. Also naturalised on Norfolk Island.

Naturalised overseas in New Zealand and south-western USA (i.e. California).
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Polygala myrtifolia is a common, widespread pioneer shrub with pretty mauve flowers on and off throughout the year with a peak in spring, hence the names Augustusbossie and September bush.polygala-paucifolia-fl-ddentzer-b.jpg
source of image
Polygala myrtifolia varies in form as it changes to adapt to the different areas it grows in, from the harshness of the coast to the drier inland climates. An evergreen shrub, the most common forms reach about 0.6 to 1.8 m in height with a few upright-growing stems and slender branches densely covered with leaves that resemble myrtle. The oval-shaped leaves are usually 25-50 mm long and up to 13 mm wide. The leaves are light green, dark green or slightly grey. Some forms of P. myrtifolia have thin, needle-like leaves. It can also grow into a small tree reaching almost 4 m high.
Polygala_myrtifolia_(flowers)_-_Botanischer_Garten_Bonn.jpg
source of image
The buds are green, flat, marked with dark veins and oval to half-moon-shaped. The lower buds open first. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal. All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring ( August to October) when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule.
new7 106.jpg
source of image
31324515903_4c464068e1_b.jpg
source of image
Polygala myrtifolia occurs naturally from the Bokkeveld Mountains near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape to Kwazulu-Natal. Along this wide distribution area changing from winter to summer rainfall, it is commonly found growing on dunes, rocky slopes, in forests, along streams, in scrub and open grassland.
source of article

Description:

Little Polly™ features vibrant mauve blooms for most of the year with the main flush appearing in spring and summer.

Key Features:

Polygala Little Polly™ is a dwarf evergreen shrub with stunning grey-green foliage.

Cultural:

Polygala Little Polly™ prefers a postion in full sun, in well drained soil, and can be pruned if desired.

Plant Landscape:

Polygala Little Polly™ is heat and frost hardy and will look great in a variety of garden styles and sizes. It is perfect for garden borders, pots, and containers.

Max Height: 100 cm
Size: 1m x 1m
Position: Full Sun to Part Shade

source

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Wow wonderful flowers garden. the look like to color mix. its really.
this is wonderful photography.thanks for the information and i like it.
@ctrl-alt-nwo

The bilaterally symmetrical flowers superficially resemble those of the Fabaceae, but the structures are not homologous. Of the 5 sepals, the 2 lateral ones are large and petaloid, usually as large as the petals; the petals are 3, the lower one forming a keel which encloses the stamens and style and usually has a fringe or appendage near the end.

The stamens are 6 (in P. paucifolia), 7, or 8. The seeds are pubescent and bear an aril (or aril-like structure), which apparently aids in dispersal by ants. Some species also produce reduced cleistogamous flowers, underground or above ground; except when explicitly stated, the key does not refer to these. The lowermost leaves are often reduced to scales.

  1. Flowers 1–4 (–5) on each stem, (12–) 15–20 (–22) mm long, the wings readily deciduous; well-developed leaves few, crowded toward summit of stem.

  1. Flowers numerous, ca. 3–7.5 mm long, the wings persistent; well-developed leaves several to many (or often none at anthesis in P. incarnata).

  2. Leaves (at least the lower ones) whorled (or opposite, look for scars if necessary).

  1. Well-developed inflorescences ca. 10–15 mm broad, sessile or on peduncles at most ca. 5 mm long.
  1. Well-developed inflorescences ca. 3–5 mm broad, on distinct peduncles usually 1–5 cm long.

source

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Fringed Polygala, Gaywings, Flowering Wintergreen (Polygala paucifolia Willd.)

By Brandee Wenzel

Easily mistaken for an orchid, this bright little jewel is always a delight to stumble across. A member of the Polygalaceae or Milkwort Family, this and fellow species in the genus Polygala produce compounds reputed to increase milk production in nursing mammals. In fact, Polygala is derived from the Latin “poly” meaning “many, much” and “gala” meaning “milk”. Ethnobotanical references to Gaywings were recorded in James Herrick’s 1977 Iroquois Medical Botany, in which the majority of use was indicated for skin inflammations such as abscesses, boils, and sores.

Fringed polygala emerges from creeping, partly underground stems, and is typically no taller than 15 cm (6 inches). Its upper leaves are oval and crowded at the top of the stem, which gives this plant its resemblance to wintergreen. The light pink to deep magenta flowers are made up of five sepals and three petals. The sepals consist of three small outer and two large, showy petal-like “wings”. Of the petals, two are united to form a tubular structure, with the third keeled or boat-shaped petal cresting in a delicate yellow or pink fringe or frill. The keel encloses the reproductive structures, and when a bug lands on the keel, these structures are exposed for pollination. Besides the showy flowers that are insect-pollinated, there are also inconspicuous flowers that are borne underground and which self-fertilize without opening.

Besides Minnesota, gaywings thrive in dry to moist conifer forests from the eastern half of Canada and northeastern United States down to the mountains of Tennessee and Georgia. Its bloom time is spring to early summer. There are over 60 different kinds of Polygala in the United States, with the greatest diversity in the Southeast. Those of us living in the northern United States are fortunate to have an abundance of this wildflower to brighten our woods in the spring.

https://www.fs.fed.us/wildflowers/plant-of-the-week/polygala_paucifolia.shtml

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Hello my dear sir.very wonderful nature photography. I like it your great full post.thanks for sharing your beautiful life.

Polygala myrtifolia is a hardy, large, evergreen shrub with glossy green leaves.


It bears abundant, mauve pea-like flowers almost all year round with a flush in late winter.

It makes a decorative small tree if pruned into a standard and makes a beautiful floriferous screening plant. It can also be pruned into a formal hedge.


Attracts Carpenter Bees to the garden.

The seeds are relished by laughing doves and other seed-eating birds.

Grows in sun or semi-shade but flowers best in full sun and makes an excellent container plant.

source

Description:
Polygala fruticosa "Petite" is a hardy, evergreen, shrublet that has shiny, grey-green, heart-shaped leaves that have red margins. The young leaves are a shiny, coppery pink.

The clusters of gorgeous, magenta, pea-shaped flowers appear from August to May and attract bees and other pollinating insects to the garden.

This beautiful plant is great in a mixed border, rockeries, Terraforce walls or containers. Used in traditional medicine.


Plant in compost-rich soil in full sun or semi-shade and water well when planting and until settled. Thereafter it will tolerate quite dry conditions.

Size: 0.4 to 1m
Wildlife:
Uses:
Distribution:
KwaZulu Natal, E. Cape, W. Cape

source

Facts
The September bush is a common, widespread, pioneer shrub that flowers on and off all year round, peaking in the spring.
The flowers resemble that of a pea-flower and close at night time.
This plant was believed to enhance milk production in livestock.


Where it grows
Occurs naturally in South Africa, from the Bokkeveld Mountains near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape to Kwazulu-Natal. Commonly found growing on dunes, rocky slopes, in forests, along streams, in scrub and open grassland.

Useful links
Plantz Africa
Queensland Government, Weeds of Australia
Glossary
Capsule: dry fruit that opens by valves, slits or pores to release seeds (dehiscent) and is composed of two or more united carpels (the basic unit of the female sexual organ).


Keel: lower petals resembling the bottom of a boat.
Obovate: two-dimensionally egg-shaped with widest part at the apex.
Raceme: a flowering structure where the individual flowers are clearly stalked, the newest and last to open being at the apex.

source

What Is A Sweet Pea Bush: Tips For Growing Sweet Pea Shrubs

Sweet pea shrubs are neat, rounded evergreens that bloom off and on all year long. They’re perfect for those spots where you get shade in the summer and full sun in winter. Sweet pea shrubs make wonderful additions to mixed perennial borders in warm climates, and they also look great in patio containers. These tidy evergreen plants bloom in shades of purple or mauve with flowers that are great for bouquets and arrangements. Find out how to grow a sweet pea bush in this article.

Unrelated to sweet pea garden flowers (Lathyrus odoratus), the sweet pea shrub (Polygalaspp.) gets its name from its similar-looking flowers. Sweet pea shrubs attract bees, butterflies and birds, making it an excellent choice for wildlife gardens. It grows 2 to 3 feet tall and thrives in sun or shade. Native to South Africa and sensitive to frost, it survives winters only in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 and 10.

Care of Sweet Pea Bush The care of sweet pea bush is minimal. Sweet pea shrubs survive without a lot of supplemental irrigation, but they look best if you water them regularly. Remember that those grown in containers need water more often than those grown in the ground. Since they bloom year round, they appreciate a little general purpose fertilizer in both spring and fall. One of the things that make sweet pea bush care so easy is that it needs little or no pruning. If you need to control the size, you can give it a light trim any time of year. The stems on older shrubs may become woody. In that case, you can cut it to about 10 inches above the ground and let it regrow. Otherwise, just leave it to grow naturally. You might also want to try growing sweet pea shrubs as a small tree or standard. In that case, remove all but one stem arising from the ground and take off the side branches on the lower one-half to two-thirds of the trunk while the plant is young. You can propagate Polygala species from seeds, which fall to the ground and take root if you don’t deadhead the plants regularly. Hybrids are usually sterile. Propagate them from softwood cuttings taken in spring or fall.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/sweet-pea-shrubs/growing-sweet-pea-shrubs.htm

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Polygalas, also known as Milkworts or Snakeroots, are a large genus spread throughout the world as they are adaptable to a wide range of growing conditions. Flowers are normally mauve and the rounded green leaves are a contrast to the distinctive 'pea like' flowers which are borne in profusion on these compact sub-shrubs. Our selection, Polygala 'Little Bibi' is somewhat special in that it holds a neat 'topiary' form even without a lot of trimming. This is a great asset to the busy gardener.

Source

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Sweet pea shrubBotanical Name

Polygala myrtifolia

Family

Polygalaceae (milkwort)

Where is it originally from?

South Africa

What does it look like?Evergreen legume-like shrub (<2 m tall) with young shoots that have short curly hairs, otherwise the plant is hairless. Smooth, woody, stems are much branched, and oval leaves (15-30 mm long) are arranged alternately on the stem. Three-petalled purple and green (on outside of side petals) sweet-pea like flowers (15-17 mm long) appear from January to December in short clusters at the end of stems, and are followed by flat, heart-shaped seed capsules (10 mm long) containing hairy, dark brown seeds (5 mm long).
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Sweet pea shrubs are neat, rounded evergreens that bloom off and on all year long. They’re perfect for those spots where you get shade in the summer and full sun in winter. Sweet pea shrubs make wonderful additions to mixed perennial borders in warm climates, and they also look great in patio containers. These tidy evergreen plants bloom in shades of purple or mauve with flowers that are great for bouquets and arrangements. Find out how to grow a sweet pea bush in this article. What is a Sweet Pea Bush? Unrelated to sweet pea garden flowers (Lathyrus odoratus), the sweet pea shrub (Polygalaspp.) gets its name from its similar-looking flowers. Sweet pea shrubs attract bees, butterflies and birds, making it an excellent choice for wildlife gardens. It grows 2 to 3 feet tall and thrives in sun or shade. Native to South Africa and sensitive to frost, it survives winters only in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 9 and 10.
980.jpg
Care of Sweet Pea Bush The care of sweet pea bush is minimal. Sweet pea shrubs survive without a lot of supplemental irrigation, but they look best if you water them regularly. Remember that those grown in containers need water more often than those grown in the ground. Since they bloom year round, they appreciate a little general purpose fertilizer in both spring and fall. One of the things that make sweet pea bush care so easy is that it needs little or no pruning. If you need to control the size, you can give it a light trim any time of year. The stems on older shrubs may become woody. In that case, you can cut it to about 10 inches above the ground and let it regrow. Otherwise, just leave it to grow naturally.
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Read more at Gardening Know How: What Is A Sweet Pea Bush: Tips For Growing Sweet Pea Shrubs https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/ornamental/shrubs/sweet-pea-shrubs/growing-sweet-pea-shrubs.htm

Polygala x Dalmaisiana is a superb choice for conservatories and cool greenhouses with beautiful purple pea like blooms throughout much of the year.

These decorative flowers are produced almost continuously along the ends of lax stems of attractive grey green evergreen foliage. Not so much an impressive centre piece perhaps but excellent as the supporting cast flanking shorter lived more flamboyant plants. And a pot or three are good for filling in below tall lanky exhibits.

Coming from South Africa this Polygala is one of many sub-tropical shrubby relations of our native Milkworts and slightly tender so cannot be grown outdoors in most of the UK. But this does not require much warmth just frost-free conditions and not too stagnant a position, damp cold is more of a threat than dry.

Although these are small shrubs they seldom become too large. (And even if one does it can be pruned back just before growth re-starts in spring.)

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The biological form of Polygala vulgaris is hemicryptophyte scapose,[1] as its overwintering buds are situated just below the soil surface and the floral axis is more or less erect with a few leaves.

Polygala vulgaris reaches on average 7–35 centimetres (2.8–13.8 in) in height. The stems have many branches and are woody at the base. It has alternating pointed leaves, almost glabrous, 2 to 4 mm wide and 10 to 20 mm long. Basal leaves are spatulate, with rounded apex, while the upper leaves are lanceolate.

The flowers are gathered in long terminal inflorescences. The colour of the corolla varies between blue and violet, it can rarely occur in purple forms. The flower's outer three sepals are normally small, green and insignificant, whilst the inner two sepals are bigger. The inner sepals are usually shorter than the petals. The stalks of the eight stamens are joined together to form a tube, and united with this tube, one on either side, are two tiny petals.

On the lower side of the flower lies the third petal; it too, is joined to the stamen tube, but it is larger, and fringed. The flowering period extends from May through July.

Common milkwort is quite similar to the heath milkwort (Polygala serpyllifolia), but in this species the inner sepals are usually longer than the petals. The heath milkwort can be all the same colours except for white. These four possible colours account for the milkworts' Irish folk-name of 'four sisters'.

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This plant has wonderful petals.
Very beautiful.
Thanks to you we learn the most amazing
plants on the planet.
Thank you very much, @ctrl-alt-nwo ,

Polygala myrtifolia just struck me with its unique original petals with amazing small hairs on the top of the petals. It seems that the petals have grown flower crown ))


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Polygala fruticosa "Petite" is a hardy, evergreen, shrublet that has shiny, grey-green, heart-shaped leaves that have red margins. The young leaves are a shiny, coppery pink.

The clusters of gorgeous, magenta, pea-shaped flowers appear from August to May and attract bees and other pollinating insects to the garden.

This beautiful plant is great in a mixed border, rockeries, Terraforce walls or containers. Used in traditional medicine.

Plant in compost-rich soil in full sun or semi-shade and water well when planting and until settled. Thereafter it will tolerate quite dry conditions

http://www.randomharvest.co.za/South-African-Indigenous-Plants/Show-Plant/PlantId/487/Plant/Polygala%20fruticosa%20Petite

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This South African shrub to 2 m high is widely naturalised across southern Australia and has become invasive in coastal areas.

These shrubs are most readily recognised by their mauve-purple, pea-shaped flowers produced throughout most of the year, predominantly during spring. Flowers develop two-celled flattened seed capsules that ripen from green to papery brown.

Whilst the plainer form with greenish lower petals is frequently observed as weedy, the showier cultivar 'Grandiflora' with larger flowers and purple lower petals has also been observed readily spreading from plantings.

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Polygala 'Alta Grande' (Large Butterfly Sweet Pea Shrub) - A shrub we expect to grow to 3 to 4 feet tall with a dense rounded habit. It is has gray-green round leaves very similar, but larger than Polygala fruticosa 'Petite Butterfly'and also has a very free flowering nature like it with the purple pea-like flowers, composed of two winged petals surrounding a whitish purple lacy crest that can be found on the plant nearly year-round. Plant in full sun or part shade with regular to little irrigation.

Hardy to 15-20 F. Polygala fruticosa is a coastal species that can even be found within the splash zone. This would make this a good candidate for beachside plantings. It also makes a good cut flower and lasts well in arrangements though the stem length on this cultivar is a bit short. We were first made aware of this plant by Doug Zylstra of West Covina Wholesale who had purchased the plant from Alta Nursery as Polygala grandiflora – to commemorate its source and indicate its larger size, we have come to call this distinctive plant Polygala 'Alta Mariposa'.

The name Polygala is Latin from the Greek word 'polugalon' for "much milk" because of the belief that cows grazing on milkwort increased their milk production. This description is based on our research and observations made of this plant as it grows in our nursery, in the nursery garden and in other gardens that we have visited. We will also incorporate comments received from others and always appreciate getting feedback of any kind from those who have some additional information about this plant, in particular if this information is contrary to what we have written or if they have additional cultural tips that would aid others in growing Polygala 'Alta Mariposa'.

https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=3707

Polygala myrtifolia var. grandiflora is an evergreen shrub or small tree native to South Africa, bearing clusters of beautiful purple flowers that resemble those of sweet peas. This variety has larger, more richly coloured flowers and more tapered, pointed leaves in comparison to the species. In habit, it’s a rounded, bushy shrub that can eventually become a small tree.
Polygala-murt-Grandifolia-Flowers-1.jpg
image source
It’s tender, so requires winter protection. Try growing it in a large pot or container that can be moved outdoors in summer, then indoors to a bright conservatory or greenhouse in winter.
Polygala_Graniflora-4.JPG
image source
For best results, grow Polygala myrtifolia var. grandiflora in a large container in full sun, in moist, well-drained, humus-rich soil.
content source

Polygala of the milkwort family is a genus featuring over 500 species of plants (annuals, herbaceous perennials, subshrubs and shrubs) which are widely distributed in warm to temperate regions throughout the world. Plants are generally noted for having alternate lanceolate leaves and pea-like often showy flowers in terminal clusters/racemes.

Polygala x dalmaisiana, commonly called sweet pea bush or milkwort, is a loose, leggy, fast-growing, rounded to spreading, bushy evergreen shrub which typically grows to 3-5’ tall and as wide. It is reportedly a hybrid between two South African species (P. opposistifolia and P. myrtifolia). Stems are clad with ovate dull green leaves (1” long). Terminal racemes of rose-magenta pea-like flowers with two winged petals surrounding a white purple crest bloom summer to frost, but bloom extends to almost year round in mild frost-free climates with minimum temperatures of 40 degrees F. Flowers resemble those of sweet pea.

Genus name comes from the Greek words polys meaning much and gala meaning milk in reference to a belief dating back to the medieval era that ingestion of plant leaves by certain nursing mammals resulted in increased milk production.

Hybrid name honors a French gardener by the name of Dalmais who reportedly raised this plant from seed in 1839.
http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=362665&isprofile=0&

Polygala Dazzler is a shrub that originates from South Africa and has attractive, almost year round, purple pea-like flowers on light green foliage. It makes a great flowering hedge.

Polygala Dazzler prefers a well-drained position, but tolerates poor soils, frost and dry conditions. Pruning in early Spring will encourage bushiness and flowers. Best feed regularly with a slow release fertiliser.

A dense South African evergreen shrub that grows 5 to 7 feet tall by an equal spread. The unique rich purple flowers have two winged petals that surround the whitish purple lacy crest. They bloom during most of the year, spring is their peak bloom period. Extremely beautiful to see in person. The leaves are relatively thick and leathery with entire margins and rounded tips. The fruit is an oval, brown capsule which is narrowly winged.

http://www.thetutuguru.com.au/shop/polygala-dazzler/

Plant: Perennial shrub that can reach up to 3 meters in height.
Location: It is a very resistant plant and although we can enjoy it indoors in a bright space, it will grow better in full sun.
Flowering: From spring to mid-summer.


Soil: It prefers a fertile and light substrate to avoid waterlogging. It is a very rustic plant, so a special substrate for outdoor plants may be a good choice.


Temperature: Avoid minimum temperatures below 7ºC
Irrigation: Frequent in summer and more moderate the rest of the year.
Fertilizer: Special fertilizer for flower plants especially during the period of maximum growth between spring and late summer.

source

Polygala myrtifolia occurs naturally from the Bokkeveld Mountains near Clanwilliam in the Western Cape to Kwazulu-Natal. Along this wide distribution area changing from winter to summer rainfall, it is commonly found growing on dunes, rocky slopes, in forests, along streams, in scrub and open grassland.


Polygala is an old Greek name from the words polys meaning much and gala meaning milk, the name given to this genus for some of its members which have the reputation for promoting the secretion of milk. The species name myrtifolia means myrtle-like leaves.

Uses
An interesting use for this polygala was recorded by Pappe , a German doctor and botanist who emigrated to the Cape in 1832. Pappe says that the Cape Malays scraped off the fresh grey bark, which they mixed with water and stirred until it frothed and then used this for washing their dead before burial.

This custom dated back long before Pappe recorded it in 1860, but it is now long in disuse. Because of this use, the plant was known in the Cape as langelier or langelede, probably a corruption of the Afrikaans lange lede meaning long joints.

In KwaZulu-Natal Polygala myrtifolia is one of the many plants known for its antibacterial, antimicrobial and antifungal properties. Tests run by the University of Natal at Pietermaritzburg have found that aqueous extracts of P. myrtifolia showed activity against Candida albicans (which causes oral candidiasis).

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Polygala myrtifolia
A quick-growing, medium-sized, rounded shrub with pale green foliage. The main flowering time is spring, but the bright purple-red flowers can appear on the bushes for most months of the year. P. myrtifolia ‘Purple Butterfly’ is a smaller shrub with purple-blue flowers in summer.
The buds are green, flat, marked with dark veins and oval to half-moon-shaped. The lower buds open first. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal. All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring ( August to October) when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule.

Polygala is an old Greek name from the words polys meaning much and gala meaning milk, the name given to this genus for some of its members which have the reputation for promoting the secretion of milk. The species name myrtifolia means myrtle-like leaves.

References12345

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This is very beautiful garden and really look flowers. so great plant information sir.


Description
Polygala Myrtifolia
Also known as the Sweet Pea Bush, and Myrtle-leaf milkwort.

A dense South African evergreen shrub that grows 5 to 7 feet tall by an equal spread. The unique rich purple flowers have two winged petals that surround the whitish purple lacy crest. They bloom during most of the year, spring is their peak bloom period. Extremely beautiful to see in person. The leaves are relatively thick and leathery with entire margins and rounded tips. The fruit is an oval, brown capsule which is narrowly winged.

Plant in sun or part shade with regular watering. It can can be grown in a container for those in colder regions. Winter Hardiness: 20-25° F. (-6.5° to -1°C)
This species is noted for its antibacterial and anti-fungal properties. Research conducted by the University of Natal found that aqueous extracts proved effective against Candida.
It belongs to the Milkwort family of Polygalaceae.

Thanks @ctrl-alt-nwo
Have a nice day.

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Very lovely flower plant . Polygala have numbers of flowers . Color of flower is just awesome. Good combination of pink and purple . Thanks for the blog

Wow Polygala myrtifolia is a gorgeous plant that gives any garden a amazing look or it is really looks good in front of house ,its flower are giving freshness to the eyes.

Lovely sweet pea (first i read pee)🙈 bush. It brings freshness and beauty to any house or garden.

For me it's also purple, anyway it's beautiful👌

So sweet photography sir . I like it your great full post

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Polygala myrtifolia is a common, widespread pioneer shrub with pretty mauve flowers on and off throughout the year with a peak in spring, hence the names Augustusbossie and September bush.
Shared on twitter

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@ctrl-alt-nwo - Sir it's beautiful... The bush type plant with lots of flowers & the place they planted it... It's truly a beautiful scenery... Nice you decided to share these information Sir... Thank you...

+W+

I love gardening sir
i share your post on twitte.
Screenshot_20181004-111432.png

Polygala myrtifolia and probably other South African Polygala species with asymmetrical flowers, pollen is first presented in a very unusual manner; eight sausage-like pollen masses are attached by their ends to the crook-shaped tip of the style (secondary pollen presentation).

Floral morphology suggests that when the asymmetrical keel of the flower is pressed down by a sufficiently strong bee, the pollen presenter springs out and the stigma and pollen hit the visitor dorsally on the right flank pleuro-nototribic.

When the keel returns to its original position, the remaining pollen is moved into the rostrum of the keel. In subsequent visits pollen is squeezed out of there by a pocket at the tip of the style. This tertiary pollen presentation follows the piston mechanism

source

Description
Polygala myrtifolia varies in form as it changes to adapt to the different areas it grows in, from the harshness of the coast to the drier inland climates.

An evergreen shrub, the most common forms reach about 0.6 to 1.8 m in height with a few upright-growing stems and slender branches densely covered with leaves that resemble myrtle. The oval-shaped leaves are usually 25-50 mm long and up to 13 mm wide. The leaves are light green, dark green or slightly grey


The buds are green, flat, marked with dark veins and oval to half-moon-shaped. The lower buds open first. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal.

All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring ( August to October) when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule.

source

Polygala is a very beautiful and charming flowering plant from the Polygalaceae family. In general, these plants are known as milkworts or snakeroots.

This beautiful plant is widespread in most parts of the world in temperate and tropical regions. The name Polygala genus comes from ancient Greek "lots of milk", because plants are thought to increase milk yield in cattle.

In addition, Polygala includes annual and perennial plants, shrubs, vines, and trees. Roots often have aromas reminiscent of wintergreen.

Here are some pictures that I took on Google!
IMG_20181004_123048.JPG

IMG_20181004_124041.JPG

IMG_20181004_124053.JPG

Source

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Polygala myrtifolia is a common, widespread pioneer shrub with pretty mauve flowers on and off throughout the year with a peak in spring, hence the names Augustusbossie and September bush.

Description

Polygala myrtifolia varies in form as it changes to adapt to the different areas it grows in, from the harshness of the coast to the drier inland climates. An evergreen shrub, the most common forms reach about 0.6 to 1.8 m in height with a few upright-growing stems and slender branches densely covered with leaves that resemble myrtle. The oval-shaped leaves are usually 25-50 mm long and up to 13 mm wide. The leaves are light green, dark green or slightly grey. Some forms of P. myrtifolia have thin, needle-like leaves. It can also grow into a small tree reaching almost 4 m high.

The buds are green, flat, marked with dark veins and oval to half-moon-shaped. The lower buds open first. The flowers are carried in small clusters at the ends of short branches and look a bit like legume (pea or bean) flowers, but are actually quite different. Close inspection will reveal that although they have two wings and a keel, they lack the banner (also called standard) petal. All polygalas also have a showy, and very distinctive brush-like tuft on the keel. The showy petals, beautifully marked with darker veins, are usually in shades of mauve or purple, but can also be pink scarlet, or white. Polygala myrtifolia has blooms throughout the year with a peak in spring ( August to October) when the plants flower profusely. The fruit is a small, winged capsule.


Growing Polygala myrtifolia

Polygala myrtifolia is an attractive evergreen shrub able to adapt to most gardens and gardeners. A tough shrub suitable for coastal gardens, fynbos gardens, low maintenance and water-wise gardens. In the new garden it is excellent as a fast growing windbreak, hedge and colourful shrub able to grow in most soil types from full sun to semi-shade. Its growth is a bit more lax, producing fewer flowers in the shade, but it grows happily in the difficult pockets that change from full sun to semi-shade with the seasons.
http://pza.sanbi.org/polygala-myrtifolia

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Polygala myrtifolia L. Polygalaceae Cultivar 'Grandiflora'. Myrtle-leaf milkwort. Distribution: Europe. Name Polygala comes from the Greek for 'much milk'.

Lyte (1578) calls Birdes Foote Trefoil (with yellow flowers), Polygala of Dioscorides. The accompanying woodcut of Lentilles, Lens, looks like Polygala but not myrtifolia which has shorter, myrtle-like leaves. Both Gunther (1959) and Lyte follow Dioscorides in using them for diarrhoea, menorrhagia, and breasts engorged with milk.

Parkinson (1640) noted the same uses, but also noted that none of his contemporaries had sorted out what the plant of Disocorides was, and his are milkweeds, calling them the Greater Milk wort, Polygala major. No modern uses. Photographed in the Medicinal Garden of the Royal College of Physicians, London.

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I love that flower, I love that color and most importantly I came to know today that the color is well known as "Mauve" and this is what is the take for me from your blog.

Polygala paucifolia Willd.
Gaywings, Fringed Polygala, Flowering Wintergreen
Polygalaceae (Milkwort Family)
Synonym(s): Polygaloides paucifolia, Triclisperma paucifolia
USDA Symbol: POPA5
USDA Native Status: L48 (N), CAN (N)
A low plant, flowering from prostrate, underground stems and rootstocks, with pink flowers tinged with purple in the axils of clustered upper leaves.

This exquisite Orchid-like wildflower resembles a tailless, tiny airplane. It was thought that, if eaten by nursing mothers or fed to cows.

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Common Name: sweet pea shrub
Type: Broadleaf evergreen
Family: Polygalaceae
Native Range: Garden origin
Zone: 9 to 11
Height: 3.00 to 5.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 5.00 feet
Bloom Time: Seasonal bloomer
Bloom Description: Rose-magenta flowers with white-purple crest
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Medium
Suggested Use: Hedge
Flower: Showy
Leaf: Evergreen
Attracts: Hummingbirds
Other: Winter Interest
Tolerate: Deer
Garden locations

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Botanical Name: Polygala myrtifolia
Common Name: September bush
Plant Type: Shrub
Polygala myrtifolia is an evergreen, tall glossy leafed shrub, bearing masses of magenta-pink pea shaped flowers all year. Likes full sun or semi shade. Prune to shape.
Plant Description:
Polygala myrtifolia is an evergreen, tall glossy leafed shrub, bearing masses of magenta-pink pea shaped flowers all year. Likes full sun or semi shade. Prune to shape.

Afrikaanse Naam: Bloukappie
Hardiness: Very hardy
Position: Sun
Water Requirements: Water wise
Evergreen: Evergreen
Growth Rate: Fast
Flowering Time: All year
Flower Colour: Mauve
Shape: Compact
Soil: Loam
Plant Size: 2m
Region: Western Cape, Eastern seaboard
Habitat: Forest margin, Riverine
Grown by Wildflower Nursery: Yes

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Shared on twitter dear.
great ost

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Polygala is beautiful flower plant . It has very pretty color flowers . It has an ability to attract everyone . Good plant for planting . Thanks. Resteem ...

Polygala myrtifolia 'Grandiflora'
Common Name:
Sweet pea shrub
Plant Type:
Evergreen shrub
Family:
Polygalaceae (The Milkwort Family)
Geographic Origin:
South and Southern Africa
California Native?:
No

source

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Other common names
sweet pea shrub

Family
Polygalaceae

Genus
Polygala can be annuals, evergreen perennials or shrubs, with simple leaves and racemes of somewhat pea-shaped flowers

Details
P. x dalmaisiana is a bushy evergreen shrub to 1.5m, with dark green, ovate leaves and terminal racemes of pea-like, reddish-purple flowers 2.5cm long, in summer and autumn

source

Scientific Name
Polygala myrtifolia L.
Family
Polygalaceae
Common Names
Bellarine pea, myrtle leaf milkwort, myrtleleaf milk wort, myrtle-leaf milkwort, myrtleleaf milkwort, myrtle-leafed milkweed, myrtle-leaved milkweed, myrtle-leaved milkwort, myrtleleaved milkwort, parrot bush, polygala, September bush, sweet pea bush, sweet pea shrub

Origin
Native to southern Africa (i.e. Cape Province, Natal and Orange Free State in South Africa).
Cultivation
Myrtle-leaf milkwort (Polygala myrtifolia) has been widely cultivated as a garden ornamental, particularly in the temperate regions of Australia. The typical form of the species is generally no longer cultivated, but a modern cultivar (i.e. Polygala myrtifolia 'Grandiflora') is now widespread in cultivation. This cultivar was thought to be sterile, but it has recently been found to set some seed.
The two forms can be distinguished by the following differences:

Polygala myrtifolia has bright pink or pale purple flowers and short, leathery, leaves with rounded tips.
Polygala myrtifolia 'Grandiflora' has bright magenta or purple flowers with longer, thinner, leaves that have pointed tips.

Naturalised Distribution

Widely naturalised in the coastal districts of southern Australia (i.e. in the coastal districts of eastern New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, southern South Australia and south-western Western Australia). Less common in the sub-coastal and inland regions of Victoria, South Australia and south-western Western Australia. Also naturalised on Norfolk Island.

Naturalised overseas in New Zealand and south-western USA (i.e. California).

https://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/polygala_myrtifolia.htm

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Polygala is a gorgeous plant . It's colors are very beautiful. Presence of polygala can makes every place beautiful . Thanks for the blog

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Polygala dalmaisiana (Sweet Pea Shrub)

Kingdom: Plantae
(Unranked): Angiosperms
(Unranked): Eudicots
(Unranked): Rosids
Order: Fabales
Family: Polygalaceae (Milkworts)
Genus: Polygala
Species: P. dalmaisiana
Binomial name: Polygala dalmaisiana
Synonyms: P. myrtifolia var. dalmaisiana
Common name: Sweet Pea Shrub, Polygala dazzler

Polygala dalmaisiana is an evergreen fast growing shrub from South Africa. It grows >1.5m tall with narrow about 2.5cm long dull green leaves and flowers that are a purplish pink with two winged petals that surround the whitish-purple lacy crest. In warm coastal conditions it can bloom all year-round.
It is thought to be a cross between Polygala oppositifolia and P. myrtifolia.




http://www.terrain.net.nz/friends-of-te-henui-group/new-exotic-trees/polygala-dalmaisiana-sweet-pea-shrub.html

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Polygala myrtifolia
POLYGALACEAE (POLYGALA FAMILY)
SEPTEMBER BUSH (E) SEPTEMBERBOSSIE (A)
NATIVE TO SOUTHERN AFRICA
SHRUB, TREE
TREE NO.: 302.1
EVERGREEN
FULL SUN
FROST TOLERANT
MEDIUM WATER REQUIREMENTS
FAST GROWER
ATTRACTS BIRDS
ATTRACTS INSECTS

source

Common name: Field Milkwort • Hindi: Mirdoi, संजीवनी Sanjivani • Malayalam: katu-vistna-clandi, kodatsjeri • Tamil: Milakunankai, Chankankolakacceti, Chankankolakam, Chitaninankai
Botanical name: Polygala arvensis Willd. Polygala arvensis Family: Polygalaceae (Milkwort family)


Synonyms: Polygala chinensis, Polygala brachystachya, Polygala procumbens
Field Milkwort is a herb with prostrate, erect or rising stems, 4-55 mm long. Leaves are obovate, elliptic, inverted lance-shaped or circular, 1.5-3.5 x 0.6-1 cm. Flowers are borne in 1 cm long racemes, smaller than the leaves, about 4-8-flowered.

Flowers are tiny, yellow. Outer sepals are ovate. Petals are yellow, laterals broadly obovate, keels equal to laterals, hooked.


Capsule is ovoid, up to 4 mm. Field Milkwort is commonly found in a variety of habitats in peninsular India. Flowering: July-September.

source

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Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush

colors are pinks and purples, the perennial Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush, Polygala fruticosa, is a nice evergreen shrub to have in your garden. Just like its name, its pink-purple flowers resemble blooming sweet peas with pleasing grey-green foliage. Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush like sun, and moderate water. I consider it a low maintenance shrub with a long bloom time of several months.

At maturity, the Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush is generally a mounding shape 2' tall x 2' wide. Not to be confused with the standard size Sweet Pea Bush, Polygala dalmaisiana, which is very similar in appearance to the Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush, except that it can be a little more leggy, reach 3' to 5' in size, and is bare at its base. I personally prefer Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush in my garden.

Originally from South Africa, and in its native habitat grows close to the coast. It tolerates temperatures to 15-20F degrees. Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush, also goes by the names, Petite Butterfly and Butterfly Pea Shrub.

The Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush can be used as a charming cutting flower, as well as a perennial pleaser in the garden. Dwarf Sweet Pea can be found most likely, at your favorite local nursery, and also on the Internet.

Please share if you grow Dwarf Sweet Pea Bush in your garden.

http://www.bonniejomanion.com/blog/dwarf-sweet-pea-bush

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Sweet Pea Bush

The Polygala genus includes more than 300 species of flowering plants that grow mostly in temperate and tropical regions around the world. The one we call sweet pea bush was cultivated as a cross of the myrtle-leaf milkwort P. myrtifolia, a common South African shrub of the Cape fynbos (FINE-bose) region. (The term fynbos comes from the Afrikaans words for "fine bush," a reference to the low stature of most plants that grow there.) Sweet pea bush is a popular landscaping plant and attracts hummingbirds.

CHARACTERISTICS
This shrub grows in a loosely rounded mound that can be about 3 to 5 feet (1 to 1.5 meters) high and just as wide. Its attractive, grayish-green leaves are small—about an inch (2.5 centimeters) long—and they provide a pretty green canvas for this shrub's brilliant display of purplish-pink, sweet pea-shaped flowers. Each blossom is made up of two winged petals surrounding a lacy center.

CULTIVATION
The sweet pea bush flourishes in a wide range of climates and locations. It is frost-hardy to at least 24 degrees Fahrenheit (-4 degrees Celsius), and grows quickly in well-draining soil, in full sun or part shade. Once established, it requires little irrigation, which makes it a good choice for water-smart California gardens. Sweet pea bushes brighten up a garden with their profusion of flowers, which bloom spring through fall in colder climates and may bloom year-round in milder zones. They can be propagated by cuttings.

https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/plants/sweet-pea-bush

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SWEET PEA SHRUB

Type : Evergreen, Shrubs
Sun Exposure : Full Sun, Partial Shade
Water : Regular Water
Planting Zones : CS (Coastal South) / Zone 9, TS (Tropical South) / Zone 10, TS (Tropical South) / Zone 11

Plant Details
South African native grown for colorful, asymmetrical flowers that look somewhat like sweet peas (Lathyrus). Dense growth to 23 feet high and wide. Inch-long, rounded leaves are gray-green. Purplish pink, sweet peashaped blooms are about 1 inches across, with a pale pink central crest. Blooms almost year-round in mildest areas, spring to fall elsewhere. Plant in well-drained soil. Excellent near coast. Good cut flower. 'Petite Butterfly' is the selection most often found in nurseries.

https://www.southernliving.com/plants/sweet-pea-shrub

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Scientific name: Polygala myrtifolia L

Common Name:
Myrtle-leaf milkwort (Bellarine pea)

Status:
Not declared noxious in Victoria.

Habitat:
The species is commonly found in coastal areas on shallow soils over calcrete or deep calcareous sands (Carter et al, 1990). It is known to establish in dune systems, coastal bluffs and also in shrublands and woodlands (Muyt, 2001). Furthermore it has been noted to establish in heathlands and heathy woodlands, mallee, lowland, grassland and grassy woodland, dry sclerophyll forests and riparian vegetation (Carr et al, 1992).

source

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Description:
Both are shrubs 1 to 2m high. Broom milkwort is a more slender shrub, usually single stemmed, with some minor branching near the tip of the plant, and narrower leaves.

Myrtle-leaf milkwort is a more robust, widely branching shrub. Flowers are purple, "butterfly shaped", and clustered near the tips of the branches. Fruit is a winged flattened capsule, ripening to a papery texture.

Preferred habitat and impacts:
In bush around towns, particularly in near-coastal locations. Broom milkwort is less common.
Myrtle-leaf milkwort is tolerant of poor soils, dry conditions and exposure to salt. It grows rapidly and flowers when still young. Seed remains viable for at least three years and can germinate prolifically after disturbance, including fire. It can come to dominate the understorey in dry bush and coastal woodland.

Dispersal:
Spread from seed in dumped garden waste, and in contaminated soil, sometimes by ants or birds.

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woq... beutiful flowers @ctrl-alt-nwo

I really liked this pink color. It soothes me

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Are you mad?? How can you say this?

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One flower garden that fits on the front yard because the flowers are beautiful and gives a lively and lively impression. I really like this color..
image
Thanks @ctrl-alt-nwo

Sweet Pea Shrub 'Petite Butterflies

Masses of vibrant purplish-magenta pea-like flowers adorn the compact mound of gray-green leaves for much of the year. A wonderful patio container plant and useful for mass plantings or mixed into a flowering perennial garden. Evergreen. Photo credit: Richard Shiell
Mature Height : 3 - 5 Feet
Mature Spread : 2 - 4 Feet

Botanical Name Polygala fruticosa 'Petite Butterflies'
Brand Monrovia Growers
Mature Height 3 - 5 Feet
Mature Spread 2 - 4 Feet
Foliage Color Gray-Green
Flower Color Purplish-Pink
Bloom Time Summer, Spring
Light Needs Full Sun, Partial Sun
Special Uses Long Bloom Season, Repeat Flowering, Showy Flowers
Plant Type Shrubs
General Care Follow a regular watering schedule during the first growing season to establish a deep, extensive root system. Watering can be reduced after establishment. Feed with a general purpose fertilizer before new growth begins in spring.

https://www.armstronggarden.com/petite-butterflies-sweet-pea-shrub.html

The propagation of the ornamental shrub Polygala myrtifolia by cuttings over 5 periods (3 seasons) with the aid of rooting hormone was studied. Stem cuttings (10 cm approximately) from the top of new shoots (simple cuttings) and new shoots together with a small portion (0.3-0.5 cm) of old shoot (‘heel’ cuttings) were taken from different regions of foliage of 4 year old mother plants.

Simple cuttings were taken in winter (January) and summer (August) of 1997 and 1998 and in autumn (November) of 1998. ‘Heel’ cuttings were taken in January 1997.

The cuttings were treated with rooting hormone (IBA) in powder or liquid from at concentrations of 500, 1000 and 2000 ppm, and planted under mist in a rooting substrate of 1 : 1 (v/v peat : perlite and pH 6.5. Substrate temperature was 24-26oC and the cuttings were maintained under these conditions for 2 months irrespective of the season.

The results showed that: Rooting was not affected by the type of cutting, i.e. simple or ‘heel’. The rooting hormone in either form had no effect on rooting irrespective of hormone concentration and season. Rooting of untreated cuttings was highest (98.3±1.7%) in warm period (summer) and lowest (41.7±11.7%) in the cold season (winter). In the autumn the percentage of rooting was 76.6%.

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Very spoiled eyes when looking at him.

I also captured beautiful flower photos in my opinion :)

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It's not Polygala buddy, maybe Ixora.

Common Name: sweet pea shrub
Type: Broadleaf evergreen
Family: Polygalaceae
Native Range: Garden origin
Zone: 9 to 11
Height: 3.00 to 5.00 feet
Spread: 3.00 to 5.00 feet
Bloom Time: Seasonal bloomer
Bloom Description: Rose-magenta flowers with white-purple crest
Sun: Full sun to part shade
Water: Medium
Maintenance: Medium
Suggested Use: Hedge
Flower: Showy
Leaf: Evergreen
Attracts: Hummingbirds
Other: Winter Interest
Tolerate: Deer

source