Green Gardening On A Budget

in gardening •  last year

Tomato Seedlings Growing In The Kitchen

Do you like to eat good organic produce? Organic is expensive, but when you use every part of the plant to your advantage, the cost goes down.  There are approximately 65 different items in the produce section that can be re-grown from the root end of the vegetable you have just cooked with. The only real cost is the first year, when I buy good organic dirt and compost and mix it up. Future compost comes from my compost maker where I put only organic produce scrapes and the scrapes from my own garden produce. 

Personally, I mainly a large garden in contaiiners of all sizes and kinds. I find a lot of discarded pots that people no longer want, old galvanized wash tubs and ice holders, old parts of charcole bbq's people throw out and the list goes on.  Anything that can have holes put in the bottom and did not have poison of somekind in it, makes a good pot. I try to not use plastic, though I have some. 

These tomatoes were nothing but a couple slices of heritage tomatoes. I placed in the pot and covered with dirt. When the seedlings come up, I thinned them out so that I can transplant them easily into hanging pots when they are ready. I grow one seedling in each hanging pot. 

Green Onions Chillin In the Pot

This pot came from a bunch of green organic onions that we cooked with but did not use the root end. We cut off about 1 or 2 inches and put these ends in water for a couple of days and then planted. We also use the regular organic onions but they are handled differently. You cut off the root end and place in water until roots appear and a little growth, and then plant in a pot. You will not get the yellow bulb onion that you started with, rather, you will grow a green onion plant. I put about 3 to a pot. I use a lot of green onion, so I usually keep at least 5 pots of onions. Just cut them off the plant, but leave a least an inch or so and they grow all year. 

A Purple Cabbage Rooting In Water That Is Ready To Plant

If you closely at the picture above, you will see the start of a new cabbage plant. I will now pot in dirt and I will get a second head of cabbage from my head of organic cabbage. We like to use the big cabbage leaves for vegan roll ups. We fill with veggies, add Balsamic Vinegar, and roll. We often cut the leaves before a hard head develops, as it is easier to work with. As long as you don't pull off the whole plant, it also will keep growing. 

Cilantro Growing In A Bag

Sometimes we grow kits for the children. Since we rarely throw the plastic away with the dirt, we re-use for another planting. When your cilantro bolts, let it flower and put a paper bag over the plant when the seeds are ready to harvest. You will have seeds galore to replant. I often plant several pots spacing them out, so I always have cilantro. When you cut them off, leave some and they also will keep growing. 

Peppers And Green Beans In Miniture Green Houses

We love those little organic sweet pepers that are yellow, orange, green, and red. When we cut and remove seeds, we put on the counter for a couple of days to dry and then plant. We will keep in plastic until the seedlings appear and then thin and let get hardy and then plant in larger pots. The seeds we do not use, we store in envelopes for future use or seed sharing in our garden groups. The green beans came from a couple of green beans that we did not cook, but rather saved the seed, let dry on the counter and then planted yesterday. In time they will be seedlings.

I have a large bag of last years plant markers that when I need to, I will place a marker in the pot with the name of the plant. I do not have a need when they are at this stage, as I do different things all the time, but only a few pots at a time.  I save the dirt from year to year and put in a wheel barrow and add fresh compust, thus giving new life to my dirt. It also prevents the same kind of plant from being in the same pot of soil year after year. 

By keeping the costs low, I can splurge on those seed packets and plants that I may not see in the grocery store on occasion. Gardening should be a fun experience. Be creative, include the kids, and enjoy your time in the garden.

 Enjoy creating new life on the homestead,

Happy Gardening,

 Marla Silva @floridagypsy   

© 2017 floridagypsy. All Rights Reserved.          


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Brilliant, I want to start growing a few things, got the tubs ready :)

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Thanks. When you do it this way and have a compost system, dirt can be used forever and your garden is almost free. Eat good gmo free, pesticide free, organicly raised produce on a budget. Anything, almost can be a pot, just remember to put drainage holes in the bottom.

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I have a large bin filed with garden waste and dead flowers,will that break down to comost?

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Yes, it will. Try to have it 75% dried brown waste to 25% fresh green waste. Turn it often, the hotter the better.

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That's what I need to do to do turn it, do I add worms?

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The wild worms should find it, but you can always add more. They are very useful in the making of good compost.

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Great I'll have a go :)

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Enjoy! There is no right or wrong, just have fun.

Thanks for the great post. It is nice to have affordable greens. And a green thumb.

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Your welcome. The green thumb is aquired as you just keep trying. It makes it easier to eat right if you have a garden.

I have always been amazed at how much cabbage stems want to grow! With your method, I think one cabbage can be nurtured into future cabbages for years! So many garden plants just want to keep growing. Your tips here are great for helping anyone get more out of the produce that they buy at the store.

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Now that is an idea I had not thought of. Though I was basicly doing that I guess in Florida. I just would cut almost down to the ground and leave some and it kept growing. Haven't dealt with winter for quite a while. Going to get a green house of some kind set up for next winter.

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Here in Oregon's Willamette Valley, I can get a few small cabbages from over-wintered stalks that I leave in the ground. It's not a sure bet, but it doesn't take any effort to keep them in the ground. And I've had the cut stalks, laying on the ground, take root over the winter, too. That's quite a switch to go from Florida to Washington! Hope you get a greenhouse, too!

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I live in a small travel trailer and I always have a garden that I keep in pots. I found it so easy in Florida and Hawaii. It was a bit of a challenge when I was in Idaho, Oregon, and Alaska. I started my adult life in Seattle and wasn't yet into growing gardens. I will do a green house very soon.

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You know how to grow plants under a lot of different conditions with that wide geography!