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Dracaena draco ( Dragon Tree ) is sometimes also called the Dragon's Blood Tree because when the leaves or stems are cut, the sap is red. These plants are slow growing and very long-lived. Older plants have many branches and end up with an umbrella-like shape and flat on top. They are drought tolerant once established and prefer temperate to warm climate, a sunny position and well drained soil. This spectacular specimen plant is growing in a waterfront reserve on Sydney Harbour.
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Dragon tree is a palmlike member of the agave family, related to Spanish bayonet (Yucca aloifolia), and century plant (Agave americana). The overall shape is that of an umbrella with a thick, swollen trunk and many stout, upright branches each terminating with a rosette of stiff, sword shaped leaves about 2 ft (60 cm) long.

Mature plants produce terminal clusters of greenish flowers, followed by round reddish orange fruits. In cultivation dragon tree barely gets 20-30 ft (6-9 m) tall, but in its native habitat 50 ft (15 m) tall specimens are not uncommon.

Dracaena draco is native to the Canary Islands, an archipelago of seven volcanic islands in the Atlantic Ocean about 160 miles (100 km) off the northwest coast of Africa. In its native habitat, dragon tree is an endangered species (listed as "Vulnerable") due to over collecting for its red colored resin, called "dragon's blood".

Dragon tree is grown as an ornamental throughout the world in Mediterranean climates, and is very popular in southern California.

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Silly Sausage Award !! You selected great Pics and nice information. Thanks.

Dracaena draco , also known as the “Dragon Tree”, or “Dragon's Blood Tree” is a drought-tolerant tree-like plant that can grow to become an stunning garden specimen or indoor plan. Native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, and Madeira, Dracaena draco grows a ringed succulent trunk topped by clustered flexible sword-like blue-green leaves. Generally unbranched until it flowers, Dracaena draco then produces branches from the sides of its inflorescence. The leaf scars on its trunk resemble a reptile’s skin, and when cut, the tree ‘bleeds’ a deep red sap known as ‘Dragons Blood’, which can be used to stain wood.

Dracaena draco , the symbol of the island of Tenerife, grows well in full sun or part shade, and needs good drainage. It adapts well to container growing, and is hardy down to the low 20s or high teens Fahrenheit. Hardy and drought tolerant, Dracaena draco can adapt well to extreme heat, winds and ocean salty weather.

http://www.cycadpalm.com/dracaena-draco-plants.html

Dracaena draco

The Dragon tree

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The Dragon tree is often planted as a special interest feature plant in ornamental landscapes and gardens in many parts of the Inland Empire. Over time it will grow into a medium size tree with a stout succulent trunk up to 25 ft. tall.

As plants mature, they develop broad crowns comprised of many branches extending outward to form a bold canopy shape. Gray-green foliage is comprised of 2 ft. long sword-shaped leaves; creamy-white flowers occur in large spikes above the foliage and are followed by bright orange berries.

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Native to Mediterranean climates on the Canary Islands, the dragon tree is one of the most unusual plants for ornamental landscapes. It is highly adapted to warm and sunny climate exposures and easily adapts to annual summer drought.

It shows sensitivity to cold temperatures below 25°F and should be planted in warm microclimate areas. Young plants are often grown in containers and raised planters to display their character as their trunks mature.

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Like other succulent-type plants, the dragon tree grows best in well-drained soils with infrequent summer watering. It takes many years to achieve tall and large specimen stature, but it is well worth the effort as few plants provide such unique character.


Resources

The dragon's blood plant (Dracaena draco) is not the friendliest or most beautiful of houseplants. But it has the single most important quality for your indoors foliage—it is tough beyond all measure. It has somewhat severe, stiffly pointed leaves that end in something resembling a spike. The leaves are solidly green, and the plant will grow to a height of 3 or 4 feet indoors.

The dragon's blood name comes from the fact that it exudes reddish resin from wounds and nicks. As a point of interest, it is said that this resin was used as a wood dye to stain the famous Stradivarius violins. It is a member of the agave family and is related to the yucca and century plant.

Native to the Canary Islands, these plants appreciate excellent drainage—the quickest way to kill it is to waterlog the roots. Watch out for leaf-tip browning, which can be corrected by using non-fluoridated water.

Source: https://www.thespruce.com/grow-dracaena-draco-1902753

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The Dragon tree is often planted as a special interest feature plant in ornamental landscapes and gardens in many parts of the Inland Empire. Over time it will grow into a medium size tree with a stout succulent trunk up to 25 ft. tall. As plants mature, they develop broad crowns comprised of many branches extending outward to form a bold canopy shape.

Gray-green foliage is comprised of 2 ft. long sword-shaped leaves; creamy-white flowers occur in large spikes above the foliage and are followed by bright orange berries.

Native to Mediterranean climates on the Canary Islands, the dragon tree is one of the most unusual plants for ornamental landscapes. It is highly adapted to warm and sunny climate exposures and easily adapts to annual summer drought

. It shows sensitivity to cold temperatures below 25°F and should be planted in warm microclimate areas. Young plants are often grown in containers and raised planters to display their character as their trunks mature.

Source

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Lovely Pics !

Dracaena draco is a woody, evergreen tree monocot that can grow to about 10-15 m in height (but exceptionally up to 21 m tall and up to 15 m in circumference at the base of the trunk). Both trunk and branches produce large, compact clusters of silvery gray leaves.

Silvery-grey, smooth dichotomously branched. When young the stem is single. At about 10-15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a flower spike. Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching.

Generally has a large central trunk that with age may develop a number of side branches subtending a hugely wide semiglobose umbrella-shaped canopy. Not to be confused with Dracaena cinnabari, the Dragon Blood Tree native to Socotra.

Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches, so to determine its age one has to know roughly how often they flower, once every ten to 15 years (maybe more frequently in the Azores), and count the number of branches, so the age of the tree can only be estimated by the number of branching points before reaching the canopy.

http://www.llifle.com/Encyclopedia/SUCCULENTS/Family/Dracaenaceae/22863/Dracaena_draco

Oh, yes, a beautiful plant @ctrl-alt-nwo and Dracaena draco (Dragon Tree) - An attractive and an interesting succulent tree that is commonly used as a house plant, but if planted in the ground in our near frost free climate it will grow to a massive and broad tree that is 25 feet tall and as wide and, with great age, even larger - one of the tallest ever recorded was over 70 feet tall. The terminal ends of the thick branches hold clusters of 2 foot long by 1 1/2 inch wide pliable sword-shaped blue-green leaves. In early summer appear the greenish-white flowers that are followed by orange berries. This plant remains unbranched until it flowers or is otherwise damaged and then produces two large heavy branches on either side of the inflorescence. When the bark is cut or bruised the sap flows as a reddish colored resin. This resin , one of the sources of a substance known as Dragon's blood can be used to stain wood. Plant in full sun or part shade. Water infrequently and deeply - do not allow the root zone to remain wet as this is the easiest way to kill this plant. It is hardy to about 20-25 degrees F - our tree in front of the nursery had foliage damaged but no lasting damage our in our 1990 freeze at 18 °F.

A very hardy and drought tolerant tree that tolerates extreme heat, winds and salt spray. This plant is native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Madeira, and western Morocco and is the natural symbol of the island of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands. It is on Tenerife where one can find the "Drago Milenario" (Thousand Year old Draco), a famous giant dragon tree located in Parque del Drago in Northern Tenerife that is believed by many people to be over a thousand years old, but others estimate it to be in the hundreds. Since monocots such at this do not form growth rings, the actual age of the plant is unknown, though the tree was declared a national monument in 1917. This species is on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) List of Threatened Species Red List as Vulnerable (A1a-e) meaning that it is facing a high risk of extinction in the wild in the medium-term future for numerous reasons (loss of habitat, exploitation, competition etc). The name Dracaena comes from the Latin word 'draco', meaning "dragon" that was already used for the specific epithet for this same plant. This new name was ascribed by Linnaeus in 1767 when he renamed the plant originally called Asparagus draco. This species received the coveted Royal Horticultural Society's Award of Garden Merit (AGM) in 2002.

We have been growing this plant since 1982 and have a 30 year old specimen along the street at our nursery entrance. Though not included on most posionous plant lists, some references claim that seed of the Dracaena draco is posionous, while others such as on the California Poison Control System, list it as safe plant. Since this contradictory information exists, we err on the side of caution, and list it as poisonous, though we cannot verify the validity of this or what the posionous active ingredient would be. This description is based on our research and observations made of this plant as it grows in our nursery, in the nursery garden and in other gardens that we have visited.

https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp?plant_id=530

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This tree is interested in that, he has a red juice. The name of this beautiful tree is of mythical origin: for his 11th work, Hercules was to return three golden apples from the garden of Hesperida, which is guarded by Landon, hundreds of dragons. Hercules killed Landon, and his blood flowed over the ground, which began to sprout the trees of the "dragon". The tree exudes "dragon blood" - red juice - at the cut.
Chests long and slender, and leaves prickly. The flowers are greenish white and have a sweet smell. Orange-brown berries are slightly less than cherries, pointed and covered with red, resinous substance and pleasant to taste. The tree is always green and durable. Thanks for the interesting posts.

https://translate.google.ru/translate?hl=ru&sl=en&u=https://www.arkive.org/dragon-tree/dracaena-draco/&prev=search

https://diacos.com.au/product/draceana-draco-dragon-tree/

The dragon's blood plant (Dracaena draco) is not the friendliest or most beautiful of houseplants. But it has the single most important quality for your indoors foliage—it is tough beyond all measure.

It has somewhat severe, stiffly pointed leaves that end in something resembling a spike. The leaves are solidly green, and the plant will grow to a height of 3 or 4 feet indoors.

The dragon's blood name comes from the fact that it exudes reddish resin from wounds and nicks.

As a point of interest, it is said that this resin was used as a wood dye to stain the famous Stradivarius violins. It is a member of the agave family and is related to the yucca and century plant.

Souce

Dracaena draco is subtropical, but can grow well in a tub because of its slow growth. After 10 years the plant is approximately 100 cm high.


This tree has no annual rings and the age of the dragon blood tree can only be estimated based on the number of branches.

Every 10 to 15 years, the growth of the stem stops and a flower stem with white lily-like aromatic flowers appears.

After flowering, the plant branches and grows on the branches again. These branches branch again after 10 to 15 years.

Source

This tree was discovered by Professor Issac Bayley Balfour in 1880. This tree is shaped like an umbrella with leaves growing on its tops. However, the form is difficult to work for the life of this tree. The added leaves can reduce the filling process and help this tree to survive in areas where the temperature is very hot

This dragon blood tree grows in dry areas and can reach more than 300 years. This Socotra dragon blood tree is still brothers with Dracaena draco from the Canary Islands, Spain. In its place of origin, Dracaena draco or also called the dragon blood tree is also one of the trees called the blood tree because this tree is red. This sap is called dragon blood. Dragon's blood is very useful for medicines, dyes, sweeteners and fragrances. In addition, for local people today in concrete as toothpaste, bath soap, glue, and coloring materials. Getalh can also be used as a digestive medicine, diarrhea, fever, respiratory problems, and sore throat.

BBJ1yY3.jpeg

The Dragon Tree ranks among the most interesting and eye-catching plants. In cooler and medium warm climates these are popular like houseplants only.
The leathery, sword-shaped leaves are green. Grows very slowly and in 10 years reaches 1 m.
Dragon Tree is insensible against heat and air dryness. For this reason is perfect for central-heated rooms and winter gardens.

dragon-tree-copy.jpg

This species has an exceptional Longevity. There was in the garden of the maison Franchi in La Orotava in Tenerife a 5000 years old dragon tree which was destroyed by a hurricane in 1868. The age of this tree is today estimated at 600 years only. In 1996, a small wild population was rediscovered in the Moroccan High Atlas, near Agadir (Dracaena draco subsp. ajgal).

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dragon tree does best in a bright spot, but will tolerate low-light conditions so you can grow it practically anywhere. In such low-light spots, you may see it lose the red or pink coloring on leaf edges and it will grow more slowly (and also require less water).

lyvm8q477w.jpg
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp%3Fplant_id%3D530&ved=2ahUKEwjGo6Dx-7XdAhVJDMAKHSPhBMMQFjAjegQIBBAB&usg=AOvVaw1jRDOnK48J5mhho80fL80H

As the common name suggests, this tree fits at home with the movie set of Dracula, or possibly Jurassic Park. The very distinctive flat topped and regularly arranged swollen branches of this tree make it a strikingly different specimen.
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@ctrl-alt-nwo,
I think this plant ins growing at dry zone area and near to ocean! Coz I have see little bit similar type of plant at coastal area of my country!
Anyway it seems nice and you made a wonderful photography as well! Thank you!

Cheers~

Here is an old one in the Canary Islands.....

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Ancient Dragon Tree
In Icod, close to the Church of San Marcos, stands a famous dragon tree (22 m high, lower trunk diameter 10 m, estimated weight 70 t), which is reputed to be a thousand years old (hence its local name, El Drago Milenario: the Thousand-Year-Old Dragon). While no study seems to have confirmed such longevity for the tree (dracos do not produce annual rings with which to tell their ages; the tree is more likely to have an age in the hundreds of years[3]), it is the long-time symbol of Icod.

Taken from ... wikipedia

Dracaena draco

The Dragon Tree

The Dragon Tree ranks among the most interesting and eye-catching plants. In cooler and medium warm climates these are popular like houseplants only.

The leathery, sword-shaped leaves are green. Grows very slowly and in 10 years reaches 1 m.
Dragon Tree is insensible against heat and air dryness. For this reason is perfect for central-heated rooms and winter gardens.

C71CAFDC-1A32-49EA-8BFA-5E536471F82F.jpeg
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If growing conditions are too hot or too dry, brown leaf points appear.

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There is very interesting variety of Dragon tree named "dragon’s blood" in ancient times due to its peculiar red sap, this tropical succulent tree is most unusual. It is native to just a small area on the Canary Islands off the west coast of Africa.
In habitat they grow to a great age.

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Dragon’s Blood Trees produce an uncanny facsimile of mammalian blood when cut. A clever coincidence of nature, the sap is also extremely compatible with mammal bio-systems. For many thousands of years, experienced indigenous healers in South America have known about the powerful medicinal properties of this sap.

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Dragon’s Blood is viscous, deep red, and has an earthy aroma.

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Dracaena marginata is an attractive, stiff-leaved plant with colorful foliage that sometimes goes by the name dragon tree. Most of the time, though, it’s sold simply as “Dracaena marginata” or just “Dracaena.” These plants are perfect for a beginner gardener because they're very easy to grow indoors.

These are tough, drought-tolerant plants with aggressive root systems that make excellent houseplants because they are a little more forgiving than some of the other dracaena. It helps that they’re attractive and varied. They are sometimes grown as single-stemmed plants; other times grouped or even braided together in the same pot.

https://www.thespruce.com/grow-dracaena-marginata-indoors-1902749

dragon tree, also called red-edge dracaena, is one of the most popular houseplants around. It bears narrow green leaves banded in red or pink on top of slender stems. Its upright habit makes Madagascar dragon tree a useful houseplant to grow against a blank wall, to provide privacy in front of a window, or at the end of a sofa or chair as it ages and becomes tree like. When it's young, Madagascar dragon tree adds beautiful texture to tabletops, desks, and other surfaces. It's often included in dish gardens because of its grassy look.

dragon tree does best in a bright spot, but will tolerate low-light conditions so you can grow it practically anywhere. In such low-light spots, you may see it lose the red or pink coloring on leaf edges and it will grow more slowly (and also require less water).

http://www.costafarms.com/plants/madagascar-dragon-tree

Spreading the wings branches like a dragon there wonderful to know about this plant

As the common name suggests, this tree fits at home with the movie set of Dracula, or possibly Jurassic Park. The very distinctive flat topped and regularly arranged swollen branches of this tree make it a strikingly different specimen.
354f3b.jpg

This tree was discovered by Professor Issac Bayley Balfour in 1880. This tree is shaped like an umbrella with leaves growing on its tops. However, the form is difficult to work for the life of this tree. The added leaves can reduce the filling process and help this tree to survive in areas where the temperature is very hot

This dragon blood tree grows in dry areas and can reach more than 300 years. This Socotra dragon blood tree is still brothers with Dracaena draco from the Canary Islands, Spain. In its place of origin, Dracaena draco or also called the dragon blood tree is also one of the trees called the blood tree because this tree is red. This sap is called dragon blood. Dragon's blood is very useful for medicines, dyes, sweeteners and fragrances. In addition, for local people today in concrete as toothpaste, bath soap, glue, and coloring materials. Getalh can also be used as a digestive medicine, diarrhea, fever, respiratory problems, and sore throat.

BBJ1yY3.jpeg

The Dragon Tree ranks among the most interesting and eye-catching plants. In cooler and medium warm climates these are popular like houseplants only.
The leathery, sword-shaped leaves are green. Grows very slowly and in 10 years reaches 1 m.
Dragon Tree is insensible against heat and air dryness. For this reason is perfect for central-heated rooms and winter gardens.

dragon-tree-copy.jpg

This species has an exceptional Longevity. There was in the garden of the maison Franchi in La Orotava in Tenerife a 5000 years old dragon tree which was destroyed by a hurricane in 1868. The age of this tree is today estimated at 600 years only. In 1996, a small wild population was rediscovered in the Moroccan High Atlas, near Agadir (Dracaena draco subsp. ajgal).

img-1_190.jpg

dragon tree does best in a bright spot, but will tolerate low-light conditions so you can grow it practically anywhere. In such low-light spots, you may see it lose the red or pink coloring on leaf edges and it will grow more slowly (and also require less water).
lyvm8q477w.jpg

BBJ1yY3.jpeg

lyvm8q477w.jpg
https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp%3Fplant_id%3D530&ved=2ahUKEwjGo6Dx-7XdAhVJDMAKHSPhBMMQFjAjegQIBBAB&usg=AOvVaw1jRDOnK48J5mhho80fL80H

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Flowering and seeds

This species flowers during January to July [1,2,4,5]. The fruits usually produce two seeds per follicle which are often released spontaneously, usually within a year after maturation. There are about 40 viable seeds per gram; seeds start to germinate in about 7 days if grown at 25°C and no pretreatment is required

Cultivation and uses

Banksia integrifolia is a fast-growing tree suitable for coastal plantings where resistance to wind and salt exposure is important [2]. It prefers sandy acidic soils and is moderately drought and frost tolerant. The heartwood.

integrifolia is pinkish to red, useful for ornamental turnery and is occasionally used for cabinetwork and in panellings where a red-hued, ray-blazoned timber is required. It is an important species to apiculture for its pollen and for the dark amber coloured honey which is of medium value.Nectivorous birds will be attracted to the species when it is flower

Source

This tree has lots of sharp claws just like the dragon. This one just had some flowers but I couldn't tell about the colour of these flowers.
Very interesting shape, the stems look like long arms!

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The flowers looked to me to be a sort of dirty creamy white colour.

Dragon Tree comes from the Socotra Islands. Also called the Dragon Blood Tree and the Socotra Dragon Tree. This tree is one of the strangest trees in the Socotra archipelago, with an umbrella-like shape. This plant is also known as Suji Socotra and Dragon Blood Tree.
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This flora is called so because of the red sap produced by this plant.
First published by Isaac Bayley Balfour, in 1882. When noted, this tree was once an icon in Windows as a Network icon. Dragon's blood is taken from the color of the red sap, and can be used as medicine or dye dye.
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Dragon trees are remnants of sub-tropical forests that died millions of years ago in the Pliocene era. This tree looks like a combination of mushrooms, umbrellas, and cranial tissue, which is strange. Trees have long been valued for thousands of years for their bright red resin. This resin is produced when the tree is pierced. Because the resin that comes out is red, this tree is also known as the dragon blood tree.
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For thousands of years, this dragon's blood has been used as traditional medicine, ingredients in alchemy for ritual and magic, and red coloring. This resin has also been used for violin varnishes, as toothpaste, as an adhesive, as a medicine for diarrhea, in photoengraving, incense, to treat post-partum hemorrhage, and as body oil.
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Dragon trees are monocots: they do not have xylem and phloem like most trees or branches that extend from the trunk; everything grows from the very top, like a palm tree. The long, thin and stiff leaves that they produce, only grow from the tip of the youngest branches and last for three to four years. The stem and branches are thick, when the buds at the ends of the branches stop growing, the branches will divide into two, creating a density, patterns of surreal branches.
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This pattern is a very functional appearance, to create a dense and shady branching, in Socotra which is hot and dry, It is intended to protect the soil around the tree and to reduce evaporation from the soil, thus providing optimal living conditions for each seed in underneath it. Small fruits are produced, generally eaten by birds, which then spread the seeds to other places.

Source:
https://www.google.co.id/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=http://smart-pustaka.blogspot.com/2011/02/dracaena-cinnabari-pohon-darah-naga.html%3Fm%3D1&ved=2ahUKEwjJireC5bXdAhWMqo8KHYtcBzgQFjAKegQIABAB&usg=AOvVaw3UdBxn5lxGxkFd-WcAjUN1

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Beautiful Pics !

In western cultures, the deep-red resin dragon's blood has been an exotic ingredient of traditional medicines and dyes since ancient times. The resin, a dried exudate, is extracted from different species in different parts of the world; sources include members of the Euphorbiaceae, Fabaceae and Arecaceae. However, the most famous sources are two Dracaena species: Socotran dragon's blood (Dracaena cinnabari) and Canary Island dragon's blood (Dracaena draco).

Dracaena draco, whose scientific name reinforces its association with dragons, is a combination of the Greek 'she-dragon' and 'dragon'. It is native to Macaronesia (Madeira, Canary Islands, Cape Verde) and Morocco, where natural populations are frequently small, and under threat from humans hence the dragon tree is considered Vulnerable. However, the dragon tree is very widely cultivated for its form, curiosity and symbolic value. The first reports of dragon trees in the Canary Islands came from Jean de Bethencourt's expedition in 1402.

The genus Dracaena contains about 120 species. Most species are found in wet and dry forests of the Old World tropics, with outliers in Micronesia and Macaronesia, the Caribbean and Central America. The discovery of a 16 million-year-old fossil Dracaena from Anatolia, with features allied to the xerophyte Dracaena draco, has been used to suggest modern dragon trees may have evolved from wet-forest species.

The dragon tree has a very distinctive growth form. Young trees have single stems and are topped by a dense crown of long, sword-shaped leaves. After about a decade, the first white, lily-like flowers and red fruits are produced. A crown of terminal buds is formed and the plant starts to branch. The branches grow for about another decade, flower and branch again. Repetition of the process over time produces a tree with a hemispherical crown. Branches also produce aerial roots which grow down to the soil, contributing to the bulk of old trees.

Individual dragon trees live to immense ages. When the Prussian naturalist and biogeographer Alexander von Humboldt visited Tenerife in 1799, on his way to South America, he saw a dragon tree at Oratava which he measured as over 21 metres tall and nearly five metres in diameter. The tree was venerated by the Guanche and Humboldt estimated its age as about 6,000 years old; the plant was lost in a storm in 1868. Today, the oldest living specimen on the island is at Icod, although it is probably only about 400 years old.

Source


Dracaena draco, the Canary Islands dragon tree or drago, is a subtropical tree-like plant in the genus Dracaena, native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Madeira, and locally in western Morocco, and introduced to the Azores. It is the natural symbol of the island of Tenerife, together with the blue chaffinch.

Dracaena draco is a monocot with a tree-like growth habit currently placed in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoidae). When young it has a single stem. At about 10–15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a first flower spike with white, lily-like perfumed flowers, followed by coral berries.

Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching. Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches, so a mature plant has an umbrella-like habit. It grows slowly, requiring about ten years to reach 1.2 metres (4 ft) in height but can grow much faster.

The specimen called "El Drago Milenario" (the thousand-year-old dragon) growing at Icod de los Vinos in northwest Tenerife is the oldest living plant of this species. Its age was estimated in 1975 to be around 250 years, with a maximum of 365 years, not several thousand as had previously been claimed.

Souce

The Dracaena draco tree is characterised by a single or multiple trunk growing up to 12 metres (39 ft) tall (rarely more), with a dense umbrella-shaped canopy of thick leaves.


It grows slowly, requiring about ten years to reach 1 metre (3 ft 3 in) tall. Young trees remain with only a single stem; branching occurs when the tree flowers, when two side shoots at the base of the flower panicle continue the growth as a fork in the stem.

Being monocotyledonous, Dracaena draco does not display annual rings and age can only be estimated by the number of branch forking occurrences (indicating the number of flowering episodes) and measuring the frequency of flowering (less than annual).

Some specimens are believed to be up to 600 years old; the oldest is growing at Icod de los Vinos in northwest Tenerife.

Dracaena draco is winter hardy outdoors. It will survive temperatures as low as 22 degrees F.

It can take high heat but performs best when protected from very strong afternoon sun. In very bright desert locations, part sun would be the preferred exposure.

Mature trees are insect and fire resistant but should be protected from high winds.

Source

As always unusual for my country. I do not cease to wonder what kind of plants there are on our planet. The slowly growing, award-winning Dracaena dragon (the Tree of Dragons) is an evergreen tree with attractive hefty limbs and stiff but flexible leaves. A weakly branched, thick, swollen, cylindrical chest empties into thick, upright arms with sword-shaped rosettes, blue-green leaves up to 2 feet long (60 cm) long. Originally smooth and gray, the bark becomes scaly with horizontal red strips, a reminder that this tree is bleeding crimson juice when the bark is cut or bruised. Draped into the blood of dragons, (Drakena means the dragon of ancient Greek), this juice is used as a varnish for violin and other small wood. This very decorative tree does not begin to branch until it first blossoms, as a rule, after several decades of growth. The dragon tree is very long, and some specimens on the Canary Islands say they are more than a thousand years old.The dragon tree is very long, and some specimens on the Canary Islands say they are more than a thousand years old.

https://translate.google.ru/translate?hl=ru&sl=en&u=https://www.gardenia.net/plant/Dracaena-draco-Dragon-Tree&prev=search

The Canary Islands dragon tree, like its close relative, the Socotra dragon tree, is a member of the asparagus family. It is well known for its striking umbrella like appearance and has long been used and valued by people living within its natural range and by those living further afield in the Mediterranean.

The Guanche people of the Canary Islands used the sap in their mummification processes. In Ancient Rome, ‘sangre de drago’ was used as a colorant. Across Europe it has been used as a varnish and anti-oxidant for iron tools.

The tree also played a role in the Greek myth: “The Eleventh Labour of Hercules: The Apples of the Hespérides”.

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After Landon, a hundred-headed dragon, is slain, red blood flowed out upon the land and from it sprung up the trees that we now know as ‘dragon trees’.

The tree once played an important ecological role. Approximately five hundred years ago the fruit of the dragon tree was the staple food of an endemic, Dodo-like, flightless bird that is now extinct.

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The wild subpopulations of the dragon tree have been in decline for a long time. The species is present in five of the seven islands in the Canaries and the total population is reduced to a few hundred trees.


In Madeira and Porto Santo, it was once an important component of the vegetation in more arid areas but is reduced today to two individuals in the wild.


A survey in 1996 revealed new subpopulations in North Africa, in the Anezi region of the Anti-Atlas Mts. in Morocco.


Thousands of individuals exist on steep quartzite cliffs in inaccessible gorges.

These subpopulations are likely to represent a distinct variant of the species. Its closest relative is the dragon tree endemic to Socotra.

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The Dracaena marginata is a species from a large plant genus (Dracaena) that has many variations in leaf sizes, leaf colors and different trunk types. The marginata is one of the most popular seen indoors that grows into an attractive plant and becomes a great focal point of a room, once it has matured enough.

How it looks and grows: The leaves are quite slim compared to other Dracaena's with arching leaves. There are three types, one has a dark red outer edge leaves with a green center, another is green in the center with red and yellowish stripes and the other the colorama has thick red edges. The leaves are produced when the trunk grows stems (cane) from the side that often needs to be trained (keeps them growing upwards). These stems have a grayish brown bark (the trunk) that can also produce smaller ones, so the Dragon tree really needs to be pruned to avoid the plant from growing in all directions
These are slow grower's that can take about 10 years to reach over 5ft tall but look lush once they reach about a foot high. They have a very similar look like palm tree plants.

Level of care: The Madagascar dragon tree is one of the easiest house plants to grow and takes neglect on the chin - then recovers quickly once the correct conditions and care is provided. The one I gave to my sister (about 5ft in height) over 10 years ago was neglected more than cared for and is now looking great.

Leaves falling: If leaves start dying and coming away at the bottom of the plant - do not worry. This is natural and similar to how a yucca tree sheds its bottom leaves for new growth. You can remove them once you see them deteriorating in appearance.
https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/madagascar-dragon-tree.html

Dracaena draco: The dragon tree

In its natural habitat in the Canary Isles, the dragon tree, or Dracaena draco, is now almost extinct. Humans coveted the blood-red juice that seeps out from cuts made in its bark. This bitter-tasting juice is actually a resin that hardens quickly after exposure to air. It’s known as dragon’s blood thanks to its deep red color and sanguine consistency.

Dragon’s blood has been used since ancient times. The aboriginal inhabitants of the Canary Isles used it to mummify their dead. Dragon’s blood is also used in traditional medicine: It was taken internally to treat diarrhea, and is also used externally to heal wounds. It was also taken to prevent scurvy, a disease caused by a lack of Vitamin C in the diet. Its similarity to human blood also caused it to be used in traditional rituals and magic.

Dried, it was burnt as incense for a spiritually cleansing effect. In the Middle Ages, dragon’s blood was nearly worth its weight in gold. In addition to its medicinal properties, this red resin was used as a varnish for stringed instruments. Today, it still finds use in making paints, varnishes, and polishes for wood and marble.

The tree can reach a height of up to 20 meters. They do not develop growth rings, but older specimens can be recognized by the dense forking of branches in the crown of the tree. The flowers of the dragon tree are white, and arranged in long panicles. When fruiting, it produces berries of an orange-red color.

Content and Images

This tree was discovered by Professor Issac Bayley Balfour in 1880. This tree is shaped like an umbrella with leaves growing on its tops. However, the form is difficult to work for the life of this tree. The added leaves can reduce the filling process and help this tree to survive in areas where the temperature is very hot

This dragon blood tree grows in dry areas and can reach more than 300 years. This Socotra dragon blood tree is still brothers with Dracaena draco from the Canary Islands, Spain. In its place of origin, Dracaena draco or also called the dragon blood tree is also one of the trees called the blood tree because this tree is red. This sap is called dragon blood. Dragon's blood is very useful for medicines, dyes, sweeteners and fragrances. In addition, for local people today in concrete as toothpaste, bath soap, glue, and coloring materials. Getalh can also be used as a digestive medicine, diarrhea, fever, respiratory problems, and sore throat.

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The Dragon Tree ranks among the most interesting and eye-catching plants. In cooler and medium warm climates these are popular like houseplants only.
The leathery, sword-shaped leaves are green. Grows very slowly and in 10 years reaches 1 m.
Dragon Tree is insensible against heat and air dryness. For this reason is perfect for central-heated rooms and winter gardens.

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This species has an exceptional Longevity. There was in the garden of the maison Franchi in La Orotava in Tenerife a 5000 years old dragon tree which was destroyed by a hurricane in 1868. The age of this tree is today estimated at 600 years only. In 1996, a small wild population was rediscovered in the Moroccan High Atlas, near Agadir (Dracaena draco subsp. ajgal).

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dragon tree does best in a bright spot, but will tolerate low-light conditions so you can grow it practically anywhere. In such low-light spots, you may see it lose the red or pink coloring on leaf edges and it will grow more slowly (and also require less water).

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https://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.smgrowers.com/products/plants/plantdisplay.asp%3Fplant_id%3D530&ved=2ahUKEwjGo6Dx-7XdAhVJDMAKHSPhBMMQFjAjegQIBBAB&usg=AOvVaw1jRDOnK48J5mhho80fL80H

As the common name suggests, this tree fits at home with the movie set of Dracula, or possibly Jurassic Park. The very distinctive flat topped and regularly arranged swollen branches of this tree make it a strikingly different specimen.
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The Dragon blood tree or Dracaena Cinnabari is a unique child from the Socotra archipelago, Yemen. This Pohorn does not only have the same appearance as red sap or resin known as dragon blood. This tree also includes trees and the world in the world.
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This tree was discovered by Professor Issac Bayley Balfour in 1880. This tree is shaped like an umbrella with leaves growing on its tops. However, the form is difficult to work for the life of this tree. The added leaves can reduce the filling process and help this tree to survive in areas where the temperature is very hot

This dragon blood tree grows in dry areas and can reach more than 300 years. This Socotra dragon blood tree is still brothers with Dracaena draco from the Canary Islands, Spain. In its place of origin, Dracaena draco or also called the dragon blood tree is also one of the trees called the blood tree because this tree is red. This sap is called dragon blood. Dragon's blood is very useful for medicines, dyes, sweeteners and fragrances. In addition, for local people today in concrete as toothpaste, bath soap, glue, and coloring materials. Getalh can also be used as a digestive medicine, diarrhea, fever, respiratory problems, and sore throat.

Source :
https://www.google.co.id/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://www.msn.com/id-id/gayahidup/rumah-dan-taman/unik-pohon-darah-naga-ini-berbentuk-seperti-payung/ar-BBJ1JZJ&ved=2ahUKEwjMldKayLXdAhXERo8KHWOKBGkQFjAAegQIAhAB&usg=AOvVaw30fcLFAQfDop8kjpE2F4op

I like the shape of the branches for some reason.

The name of this beautiful tree has mythical origins: for his 11th labour, Hercules had to bring back three golden apples from the garden of the Hespérides, which is guarded by Landon, the hundred-headed dragon. Hercules killed Landon and his blood flowed out over the land, which began to sprout ‘dragon’ trees

(2). The tree exudes ‘dragon’s blood’ – a red sap – when cut

(3). The trunks are long and slender and the leaves are prickly

(4). The flowers are greenish-white and have a sweet smell

(5) The orange-brown berries are a little smaller than a cherry, pointed

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Dragon tree is really a beautiful plant. It's extremely slow-growing, taking 8-11 years to reach just 2-3 feet, when it begins to flower. Flowering occurs almost simultaneously on the Canary Islands, taking place only every 15 years.
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The flowering causes the stem to branch, resulting in a highly branched tree which can be aged according to the number of branches. The oldest individual is thought to be more than 650 years old. The sap of this species is used as colouring matter for varnishes, tooth-pastes, tinctures and plasters.
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The dragon tree is found in dry forests. On Madeira and in the Azores, the plant grows in steep coastal cliffs usually below 200 m altitude. In the Canaries, it can be found in inaccessible cliffs from 100 - 600 m altitude, and in Morocco and Cabo Verde it grows high in the mountains.
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Dracaena draco (Dragon Tree) - An attractive and an interesting succulent tree that is commonly used as a house plant, but if planted in the ground in our near frost free climate it will grow to a massive and broad tree that is 25 feet tall and as wide and, with great age, even larger - one of the tallest ever recorded was over 70 feet tall.


The terminal ends of the thick branches hold clusters of 2 foot long by 1 1/2 inch wide pliable sword-shaped blue-green leaves. In early summer appear the greenish-white flowers that are followed by orange berries. This plant remains unbranched until it flowers or is otherwise damaged and then produces two large heavy branches on either side of the inflorescence. When the bark is cut or bruised the sap flows as a reddish colored resin. This resin , one of the sources of a substance known as Dragon's blood can be used to stain wood. Plant in full sun or part shade. Water infrequently and deeply - do not allow the root zone to remain wet as this is the easiest way to kill this plant.

It is hardy to about 20-25 degrees F - our tree in front of the nursery had foliage damaged but no lasting damage our in our 1990 freeze at 18 °F. A very hardy and drought tolerant tree that tolerates extreme heat, winds and salt spray. This plant is native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Madeira, and western Morocco and is the natural symbol of the island of Tenerife, the largest of the Canary Islands

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DESCRIPTION

A great decorative feature tree with its spiky foliage is a hardy, long living evergreen tree has a crown of stiff rosettes of lance shaped leaves to 60cm long and 5cm wide.

Flowers are followed by orange berries in summer.

Native to the Canary Islands.

Adaptable to a range of soils and conditions but prefers a rich moist soil in a protected sunny position, drought and frost tender.

How To Grow

Although seed can be sown most of the year in Australia seed is generally best sown in spring or autumn, avoid the coldest and hottest months of the year. The optimum germination temperature for germination is around 22-30°C for this species.

Soak overnight overnight in tepid water.
Sow seed just below to surface. Do not bury to deeply.
Cover with seed raising mix to a depth of the seed width. Do not bury the seed to deeply.
Place in a warm shaded or semi shaded position to avoid dying out.
Keep warm & moist, avoid drying out or waterlogging the growing mix.
Germination should occur in 14-28 days @ 22-30°C

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Madagascar Dragon Tree Plant Features

Madagascar dragon tree, also called red-edge dracaena, is one of the most popular houseplants around. It bears narrow green leaves banded in red or pink on top of slender stems. Its upright habit makes Madagascar dragon tree a useful houseplant to grow against a blank wall, to provide privacy in front of a window, or at the end of a sofa or chair as it ages and becomes tree like. When it's young, Madagascar dragon tree adds beautiful texture to tabletops, desks, and other surfaces. It's often included in dish gardens because of its grassy look.

Madagascar Dragon Tree Growing Instructions

Madagascar dragon tree does best in a bright spot, but will tolerate low-light conditions so you can grow it practically anywhere. In such low-light spots, you may see it lose the red or pink coloring on leaf edges and it will grow more slowly (and also require less water).

Water Madagascar dragon tree when the top inch or so of the soil starts to dry. The plant holds up to dry conditions fairly well, so you don't have to worry about it dying if you miss a watering or two.

If your Madagascar dragon tree develops brown leaf tips, the most common cause is low humidity. Add more moisture to the air by grouping it near other houseplants, moving it to a humid room such as bathroom, or setting your Madagascar dragon tree on a large tray filled with pebbles and water (so the bottom of the pot is on the pebbles, above the water line).

Fertilize Madagascar dragon tree once or twice a year at minimum with a houseplant fertilizer. If you want your plant to grow faster, you can feed it more frequently. Just don't exceed the recommendations on the fertilizer package.

If you wish to prune your Madagascar dragon tree, you can cut the top off; it will sprout new branches. If you pot the part you cut off in moist potting mix, it may root and grow into another plant.

This wonderful houseplant is not recommended for human or animal consumption.

http://www.costafarms.com/plants/madagascar-dragon-tree

Dragon trees grow best in medium sunlight but they can survive in partial shade as well. Plants in lower light situations will grow slower. Don't put your dragon tree in full sun though because its leaves will burn. For indoor potting soil use loose, well-drained potting mix. Make sure their pot has room for the extensive root system. They have a lower need for fertilizer, so fertilizer lightly at the beginning of spring or twice a year with controlled-release fertilizer.

It's easy to over water this plant. To ensure that you don't drown your houseplants wait until the topsoil is half dry before watering.
Propagation

Dracaena marginata roots easily from root tip cuttings, so easily that it’s often used in dish gardens and readily propagated by nurseries and retailers. It takes about three weeks for a cutting to sprout roots, and rooting hormone isn’t necessary. Dragon tree cuttings can make a great housewarming gift.
Repotting

Repot your dragon tree as necessary into larger pots, since these trees grow so slowly, they might not need to be repotted more than every second or even every third year. Refresh potting soil annually with fresh soil to replace any that has compacted.

Varieties

Although there are several varieties, the most commonly found include:

D. marginata ‘Tricolor,’ which has dark red margins, green leaves, and an ivory stripe down the leaf center
D. marginata ‘Bicolor,’ with red and green stripes
D. marginata, the basic form with dark green leaves and thin red leaf margins

Grower's Tips

Dracaena marginata is not a difficult plant to care for indoors. Keep it on the dry and warm side, and give it plenty of light, and the plant should respond well. Like other plants in its genus, Dracaena marginata is sensitive to fluoride, which can cause discoloration. Water them with distilled or non-fluoridated water. Be aware that some districts put fluoride in tap water. You may want to check with your local sanitation department before using a garden hose on your tree. Although they are usually disease resistant, Dracaena marginata are susceptible to scale, mealybugs, and thrips.

Another thing to keep in mind with Dracaena marginata is that beautiful as they are, the plant is also poisonous. While it's not harmful to humans, the leaves are extremely toxic to cats and dogs. If your pets like to nibble on your houseplants, this might not be a good fit for your home.
http://www.madaboutplants.com.au/image/cache/data/shade/drgon-tree-
500x500.jpghttps://www.thespruce.com/grow-dracaena-marginata-indoors-1902749
https://www.thespruce.com/grow-dracaena-marginata-indoors-1902749

dragon tree is a bold accent if you have the space. Its daring, upright form punctuates the decor like an exclamation point, adding excitement to any room.
dragon tree, dracaena marginata

This beautiful tree starts out as a thick tuft of spiky leaves. As it grows, the lower leaves naturally fall, leaving a cluster of dramatic, spear-shaped leaves above a bare woody stem. Its narrow, red-edged leaves can grow about 12-16 in (30-40 cm) long.

Clean it up. Those tall, upright leaves tend to be dust-catchers. If possible, take the plant outdoors when the weather permits and gently spray the leaves with tepid water. Or wipe them off with a damp cloth.

Keep it short. Slow-growing, this exotic house plant will eventually reach 6 ft (1.8 m) tall indoors. You can control its height by simply cutting off the top.

Take a stand. Give a young plant a boost by placing it on an indoor plant stand. The tall, spiky leaves of the dragon tree looks spectacular by itself on a pedestal stand. Or combine it with shrubby and trailing plants for contrast. Take a look at these new ways to display your indoor plants.

http://www.guide-to-houseplants.com/dragon-tree.html

Amazing trees!
Thank you for telling us about them, @ctrl-alt-nwo

Deciduous-decorative dracaena is known to many, but not everyone knows that the "ancestor" of this amazing plant is a relict plant.

This succulent is a relative of the cactus.

I read that according to the legend of the Guanches, the first trees grew on the blood of the dragon, who died in a fight with a fearless and strong elephant.


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In my opinion, this tree is very similar to a dragon. And if you still consider the red juice, it immediately becomes clear why he was so called. This is another plant that I saw for the first time thanks to your blog.

По моему мнению, это дерево очень похоже на дракона. А если еще учесть красный сок, то сразу становится понятно, почему его так назвали. Это еще одно растение которое я увидел впервые благодаря Вашему блогу.

Well-chosen name, it looks like a dragon with a few heads and on the top has a wonderfully prickly crown :-) interesting tree

If you don’t mind :-)

https://steemit.com/photography/@margaretwise/a-real-rug-of-deep-purple

Greetings

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Not to be confused with the related Dracaena cinnabari, the dragon blood tree native to Socotra (an island in the Arabian Sea, part of Yemen).

Dracaena draco, the Canary Islands dragon tree or drago, is a subtropical tree-like plant in the genus Dracaena, native to the Canary Islands, Cape Verde, Madeira, and locally in western Morocco, and introduced to the Azores. It is the natural symbol of the island of Tenerife, together with the blue chaffinch.

DESCRIPTION

Dracaena draco is a monocot with a tree-like growth habit currently placed in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoidae).[4] When young it has a single stem. At about 10–15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a first flower spike with white, lily-like perfumed flowers, followed by coral berries. Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching. Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches, so a mature plant has an umbrella-like habit. It grows slowly, requiring about ten years to reach 1.2 metres (4 ft) in height but can grow much faster.

USES

When the bark or leaves are cut they secrete a reddish resin, one of several sources of substances known as dragon's blood. Red resins from this tree contain many mono- and dimeric flavans that contribute to the red color of the resins.[10] Dragon's blood has a number of traditional medical uses, although dragon's blood obtained from Dracaena draco was not known until the 15th century,[11] and analyses suggest that most dragon's blood used in art was obtained from species of the genus Daemonorops

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The name suits it very well :)

It sure is pretty beautiful by the way :)

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Dracaena draco is a monocot with a tree-like growth habit currently placed in the asparagus family (Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoidae).[4] When young it has a single stem. At about 10–15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a first flower spike with white, lily-like perfumed flowers, followed by coral berries. Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching. Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches,640px-Dracaena_draco.jpg
Being a monocotyledon, it does not display any annual or growth rings so the age of the tree can only be estimated by the number of branching points before reaching the canopy. The specimen called "El Drago Milenario" (the thousand-year-old dragon) growing at Icod de los Vinos in northwest Tenerife is the oldest living plant of this species. Its age was estimated in 1975 to be around 250 years, with a maximum of 365 years, not several thousand as had previously been claimed.[6] It is also the largest D. draco tree alive640px-VilaNovaSintraDragoeiro2.jpg
When the bark or leaves are cut they secrete a reddish resin, one of several sources of substances known as dragon's blood. Red resins from this tree contain many mono- and dimeric flavans that contribute to the red color of the resins.[10] Dragon's blood has a number of traditional medical uses, although dragon's blood obtained from Dracaena draco was not known until the 15th century,[11] and analyses suggest that most dragon's blood used in art was obtained from species of the genus Daemonorops.640px-Dragon_Tree_in_the_Will_Rogers_Memorial_Park_in_Beverly_Hills,_California.JPG
(Sourse).
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dracaena_draco#

The Dragon tree is often planted as a special interest feature plant in ornamental landscapes and gardens in many parts of the Inland Empire. Over time it will grow into a medium size tree with a stout succulent trunk up to 25 ft. tall. As plants mature, they develop broad crowns comprised of many branches extending outward to form a bold canopy shape. Gray-green foliage is comprised of 2 ft. long sword-shaped leaves; creamy-white flowers occur in large spikes above the foliage and are followed by bright orange berries.

Native to Mediterranean climates on the Canary Islands, the dragon tree is one of the most unusual plants for ornamental landscapes. It is highly adapted to warm and sunny climate exposures and easily adapts to annual summer drought. It shows sensitivity to cold temperatures below 25°F and should be planted in warm microclimate areas. Young plants are often grown in containers and raised planters to display their character as their trunks mature.

Like other succulent-type plants, the dragon tree grows best in well-drained soils with infrequent summer watering. It takes many years to achieve tall and large specimen stature, but it is well worth the effort as few plants provide such unique character.

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Plant of tree-like form that reaches 20 m in height, although it is not woody. It is characterised by its aerial roots, which sometimes merge with the basal part of the thick, upright trunk, and its dichotomous branching (the branches are divided in two similar parts from the apex). This division only takes place after flowering.

For this reason, any unbranching dragon trees have not yet reached sexual maturity, whereas older specimens usually have a very branching crown, in the shape of a fan. The almost smooth bark displays a mixture of colours including reds, greys, and even silver. The whitish-green leaves are simple, up to 60 cm in length, flat, pointed, leathery, flexible, and sword-shaped. They are grouped into very compact plumes at the ends of the trunk or branches. These leaves are joined to the plant with an orangey sheath and therefore have no stalk.

During the summer, they are covered in large, branching inflorescences. These hold many flowers whose nectar and pollen attract bees. The flowers are hermaphroditic, creamy white in colour and sometimes pink hued. The fruits are fleshy, spherical berries, up to 1.5 cm in diameter and orange when ripe. They contain 1 or 2 seeds.

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Native to The Canary Islands, this tree when mature is a real conversation piece. It has a thick scaly trunk and after it's the flowering produces limbs that grow in segments, each segment taking 10 to 15 years to mature. The leaves are stiff and fleshy and sprout at the ends of the limbs giving the appearance of fingers when first emerging. If cut, the leaves and stems produce red sap.

There are specimens in the Canary Islands thought to be in the region of 350 years old.
Form: Single trunk, Umbrella shaped
Best Uses: Large specimens can be seen on old estates and in botanical gardens where they may have been growing for more than 100 years.
Small specimens make an interesting addition to xeriscaping, or equally in a tropical setting.
Can also be grown indoors.
Recommended Placement: Requires deep watering, but must be well drained or the base will rot. Larger plants will tolerate drought and some cold.

Optimal Soil: Well draining sandy loam.

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Distribution and habitat:
Native to the Canary Islands and now endangered in its natural habitat, the Dracaena draco is one of the world’s most unique and grand feature trees. With succulent branches and strap-like leaves, thick smooth trunk and blue-green foliage, even when young, Dracaena draco gives off an aura few plants can match.
Dracena-Draco.jpg

Description:
Dracaena draco is an evergreen tree with a single, smooth grey trunk which eventually becomes multi-stemmed when the plant is much older. Attractive blue-green leaves may grow up to 60cm (23 inch) long and 5cm (2 inch) wide. The leaves are somewhat severe, stiffly pointed that end in something resembling a spike. The leaves are solidly green, as the old leaves die the stem gradually unveils with a scaly pattern. The Dracaena draco will grow to 0.9-1.2m (3-4 feet) indoors.
Dragon tree (Dracaena draco)5.jpg

Care:
Thrives in a moist well drained soil in a sunny or partly shaded position and is drought tolerant when established. Avoid wet boggy soils and over-watering. Dracaena draco will appreciate good organic matter. Slow growing; takes about 10 years to reach about 1.5m (5 feet).

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The dragon's blood plant (Dracaena draco) is not the friendliest or most beautiful of houseplants. But it has the single most important quality for your indoors foliage—it is tough beyond all measure. It has somewhat severe, stiffly pointed leaves that end in something resembling a spike. The leaves are solidly green, and the plant will grow to a height of 3 or 4 feet indoors.

The dragon's blood name comes from the fact that it exudes reddish resin from wounds and nicks. As a point of interest, it is said that this resin was used as a wood dye to stain the famous Stradivarius violins. It is a member of the agave family and is related to the yucca and century plant.

Repot this plant annually or every other year. D. draco thrives when slightly pot-bound, but beware the plant doesn’t become top-heavy and tip over smaller containers.

These trees can live for hundreds of years, with some that are highly revered in the Canary Islands. You can sometimes see old ones in the U.S. on estates or in botanical gardens.

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The dragon tree is extremely slow-growing, taking 8 - 11 years to reach just 2 – 3 feet, when it begins to flower. Flowering occurs almost simultaneously on the Canary Islands, taking place only every 15 years. The flowering causes the stem to branch, resulting in a highly branched tree which can be aged according to the number of branches. The oldest individual is thought to be more than 650 years old.

Populations totaling a few hundred trees are found on five of the seven Canary Islands, in addition to two individuals on Madeira Island, Portugal and populations in Cape Verde, Morocco and about 50 – 80 trees on the Azorean Islands, particularly on Ilha das Flores.

The dragon tree is found in dry forests. On Madeira and in the Azores, the plant grows in steep coastal cliffs usually below 200 m altitudes. In the Canaries, it can be found in inaccessible cliffs from 100 - 600 m altitude, and in Morocco and Cabo Verde it grows high in the mountains.

This species has undergone an extreme decline because of complex problems. It is said that its seeds used to germinate as a result of being eaten by a flightless bird and passing through the bird’s gut, but following the extinction of this bird, the seeds can no longer germinate without human manipulation.

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Dragon tree is a very slow-growing, evergreen tree that can eventually reach a height of around 10 metres.

It grows without branching in the early years of its life until it first produces a terminal inflorescenceEventually it produces a domed, spreading head of regular branches.

The tree is often harvested from the wild, and also sometimes cultivated, for its resin, called dragon's blood, which is traded internationally as a medicine.

Although widespread in cultivation, the species is classified in the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species(2010) as 'Vulnerable' in the wild where populations have been in decline for a long time

At least one reason for the decline is the over-exploitation of the tree as a source of a medicinal resin

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Thank you for showing us this dinosaur among plants, it is very ancient, one of the first trees on Earth. It is not surprising that it is able to heal something before which the physicians are powerless, its juice, or tar, is used to treat leprosy. Antibacterial properties, antiviral, wound-healing. This is a real natural pharmacy and even more.

When we brush our teeth and see the red component in the toothpaste, it is most likely the blood of this tree, its extract.

It can withstand quite severe frosts. It is interesting that it grows where frost does not happen, but, at the genetic level, it is not afraid of them.

A dragon in the garden? With a fat and scaly trunk, leggy succulent branches that reach skyward to support an umbrella-like canopy of rosette-shaped foliage clusters, stiff blue-green leaves shaped like swords, and greenish-white flowers that are later replaced with dripping strands of red and black berries, the dragon tree Dracaena draco has a look all its own.

Dragon trees are native to Spain’s Canary Islands; Cape Verde; Morocco; and Madeira, Portugal. The dragon tree is still found on five of the seven Canary Islands, but only a few hundred trees are left. New subpopulations were discovered in 1996 in North Africa, in Morocco’s Anti-Atlas Mountains, where thousands reportedly grow along steep, rocky cliffs in hard-to-reach gorges.

They are drought tolerant, grow in both full sun and partial shade, can tolerate salt spray, and can withstand extreme heat and cold temperatures down to 20 degrees Fahrenheit (-7 degrees Celsius). The tree’s clusters of long leaves collect rain and moisture in the air, to take advantage of the limited water available in their habitat.

https://animals.sandiegozoo.org/plants/dragon-tree

Dragon Tree is slow-growing, award-winning Dracaena draco (Dragon Tree) is an evergreen tree with attractive hefty limbs and stiff but flexible leaves. Sparsely branched, the thick, swollen, cylindrical trunk, branches into stout, upright arms with terminal rosettes of sword-shaped, blue-green leaves to 2 ft. in length (60 cm).

Initially smooth and gray, the bark becomes scaly with horizontal, red stripes, a reminder that this tree bleeds crimson sap when the bark is cut or bruised. Likened to the blood of dragons, (Dracaena means dragon in ancient Greek), this sap is used as a varnish for violins and other fine wood.

In early summer appear panicles of greenish-white flowers on mature plants. They are followed by orange berries. This very ornamental tree does not begin to branch until it has flowered for the first time, usually after a couple decades of growth.

Dragon tree is very long-lived, with some specimens in the Canary Islands said to be more than a thousand years old. With its beautiful umbrella shape and palmlike appearance, Dragon Tree makes a dramatic focal point in the landscape. It is a good choice for coastal areas since it tolerates winds, salt spray, and salty soils.

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@ctrl-alt-nwo - Sir this tree got a weird look... Like claws of dragons... Nice photography Sir... It's first time I see this tree...

+W+

awesome trees! Stunning color vibration - the green color/hues are beautiful! Thanks for sharing!! ❤😊❤

The dragon tree is extremely slow growing, taking 8-11 years to reach just 2–3 feet, when it begins to flower. Flowering occurs almost simultaneously on the Canary Islands, taking place only every 15 years.

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The flowering causes the stem to branch, resulting in a highly branched tree which can be aged according to the number of branches. The oldest individual is thought to be more than 650 years old.
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The sap of this species is used as colouring matter for varnishes, tooth-pastes, tinctures and plasters.
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Dracaena draco is a monocot with a tree-like growth habit currently placed in the asparagus family. When young it has a single stem. At about 10–15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a first flower spike with white, lily-like perfumed flowers, followed by coral berries. Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching. Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches, so a mature plant has an umbrella-like habit. It grows slowly, requiring about ten years to reach 1.2 metres in height but can grow much faster.
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Very pleased to learn about this beautiful plant. I eagerly waiting for your next article.

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Dragons Blood Tree

As the common name suggests, this tree fits at home with the movie set of Dracula, or possibly Jurassic Park. The very distinctive flat topped and regularly arranged swollen branches of this tree make it a strikingly different specimen.

The grey – green foliage, strong silver-smooth trunk, distinct creamy-white flowers in spikes, and the bright orange berries visually stand this tree apart from all others.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcScoXi0uKY6MJ2v47qHdYD_4e-9MOEphvwETQX6HFgC9rFZKDG79g
Even though the eventual broad canopy is significant, it can be used against buildings as a foil and in raised planter beds for strong architectural affect. Useful as a large park specimen where there is minimal and limited frost. In the right position this tree could make an astounding avenue planting.

The Waite Arboretum in Urrbrae, South Australia has two excellent mature specimens and use it’s outline as the distinguishing logo for the Arboreta and the friends group. An excellent plant

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Slow-growing, award-winning Dracaena draco (Dragon Tree) is an evergreen tree with attractive hefty limbs and stiff but flexible leaves. Sparsely branched, the thick, swollen, cylindrical trunk, branches into stout, upright arms with terminal rosettes of sword-shaped, blue-green leaves to 2 ft. in length (60 cm).

https://www.gardenia.net/rendition.slider_detail/uploads/plant/1488133888-85e149332afb5e337/Dragon%20tree%20(Dracaena%20draco)2.jpg

Initially smooth and gray, the bark becomes scaly with horizontal, red stripes, a reminder that this tree bleeds crimson sap when the bark is cut or bruised. Likened to the blood of dragons, (Dracaena means dragon in ancient Greek), this sap is used as a varnish for violins and other fine wood.

https://www.gardenia.net/rendition.slider_detail/uploads/plant/1488133890-97186a1fbd80f19cf/Dragon%20tree%20(Dracaena%20draco)6.jpg

In early summer appear panicles of greenish-white flowers on mature plants. They are followed by orange berries. This very ornamental tree does not begin to branch until it has flowered for the first time, usually after a couple decades of growth

https://www.gardenia.net/rendition.slider_detail/uploads/plant/1488133890-97186a1fbd80f19cf/Dragon%20tree%20(Dracaena%20draco)5.jpg

Dragon tree is very long lived, with some specimens in the Canary Islands said to be more than a thousand years old. With its beautiful umbrella shape and palmlike appearance, Dragon Tree makes a dramatic focal point in the landscape. It is a good choice for coastal areas since it tolerates winds, salt spray and salty soils

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Wow look like claws of dragons.fantastic sir. great post and thanks for sharing.
1000% like and resteem

Transplanting a Dracaena Draco Dragon Tree

The best way to move or transplant a Dracaena Draco Dragon Tree is to follow these handy tips.

Lucky Jane scored a mature tree approx 10ft tall with five sprouts.

“It was going to be demolished so it was a very hasty transplant. I am worried that it will not survive the transplant because I didn’t prepare the soil well or do much research into what is required.

Do you have any tips that will help with the survival of this gorgeous tree.”

The worst thing to do is plant a Draco too deep. At ten years, the roots at the base of the trunk should be exposed.
If it’s over six foot you’ll need two stakes and at ten foot three stakes to support the Draco for the first year. Don’t try to get it too support itself as that is the surest way to plant it too deep.


Trim the leaves, the lower ones aggressively.
Make sure the area doesn’t get sodden, the Draco will root at the bottom if its feet get too wet.
Soil should allow good drainage. Like almost all plants Dracos will appreciate good organic matter.
The plant will look wilted and dry for one to two months. Check around the base every week or two, make sure you can see the top roots. Water after the soil has dried out.

If you plant a Draco or any plant too deep it will rot around the collar.

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An exotic Dracaena draco tree that has been cut at multiple points to bring out more symmetric branches and attain this shape and look. This tree can be placed in semi-indoor, semi-outdoor and outdoor areas like mall entrances, high-end offices, hotels, hospitals, airports etc where we get sunlight. Dracaena draco, the Canary Islands dragon tree or drago, is a subtropical tree-like plant and is a monocot with a tree-like growth habit currently placed in the asparagus family. When young it has a single stem. At about 10–15 years of age the stem stops growing and produces a first flower spike with white, lily-like perfumed flowers, followed by coral berries. Soon a crown of terminal buds appears and the plant starts branching. Each branch grows for about 10–15 years and re-branches, so a mature plant has an umbrella-like habit. It grows slowly, requiring about ten years to reach 1.2 metres in height but can grow much faster. Dracaena draco is cultivated and widely available as an ornamental tree and is a great focal point piece.

An exclusive tree that is an artists delight and loved by all landscape architects. Looks beautiful placed at any focal point, this tree can enhance the overall appeal of any landscaping and fits well in all landscape designs.

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Dragon tree.....a perfect name for its shape and as you mentioned sap is red. But my question is will this be considered a deciduous tree or conifers tree ?

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It is not deciduous, and it is not a conifer either.

It is looking attractive in dense green. Dragon trees are not very common in my country but i am liking this one picture and wish to plant on in future.
It contains long slender striped leaves that explode out of a strong trunk. Great for a modern or bohemian look, and one of the easiest plants to grow and care for.

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Very nice garden photography @ctrl-alt-nwo sir.
I like it your every Post and very nice plants photography. I appreciate your valuable content.your content is very interesting. I like it your every beautiful content. thank you so much sir for sharing this beautiful Australia photography...

Botanical Name: Dracaena draco
Family: Agavaceae
Genus: Dracaena
Species: draco
Common Name: Dragon Tree, Dragontree
Seeds Per Pound: 953
Quantity: 2.92 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet: 10
Germination: 98%
Germination Test Type: cut
Purity: 99%
Height: 50-60 feet
Collection Locale: California
Crop Year: 2017
Minimum Hardiness Zone: 9

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Dracaena draco, is also commonly known as dragon tree. It is a slow growing, subtropical tree-like plant. The plant has a single stem when young and after 10-15 years the plant will produce a single flower like spike with coral berries which is then when the plant will start branching out and eventually form an umbrella-like habit.

http://www.cactus-aventures.com/KaktitosPlants/Succulent%20Plants%20Catalogue/DRACAENA%20(Nolinoideae)/slides/Dracaena%20draco,%20El%20Bailadero,%20TF%20Dscf0546.jpg
The Dracaena draco makes a fantastic feature plant around pools and in pots.

Quick Facts

Very slow growing requiring about ten years to reach 1.2 meters
Single steamed tree-like when young
Umbrella-like form when mature
Full sun
Part shade
Well drained soil
Water slowly, and allow to dry completely between soakings


Drought tolerant

Our plants are beautifully grown, mature tube stock with well developed roots. They are guaranteed sun-hardened, can be planted directly into the ground and are excellent performers for your garden.

We carefully package your plants into a customised box to ensure safe transport, healthy plants and delivery to your door.

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Dracaena draco - Dragon Tree

Very slow growing evergreen tree, eventually can reach a height of 20 feet tall.
Prefers sun or partial shade.
Blooms greenish-white flowers sporadically throughout the year.
Does excellent in containers, water when to top half of soil in the container is dry.
Drought tolerant.
Very unique specimen tree for a desert or drought tolerant garden.

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We learned a lot this dragon tree from you. Nice sharing my friend.

Dracaena is an wonderful tree. I have no knowledge about this tree. But today you have introduced this tree with photos. I am looking this amazing tree once and again. Thanks for your post.

It's branches and leaves are saying that dragon is very fit name for this tree. Amazing tree

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Other common names

dragon tree
dragon's blood tree

Family
Asparagaceae

Genus
Dracaena are evergreen trees, the few branches bearing linear to lance-shaped leaves often crowded towards the tips; on mature plants, small greenish-white flowers may be followed by orange or red berries

Details
D. draco is a slow-growing evergreen tree becoming sparsely branched, with terminal rosettes of sword-shaped leaves to 60cm in length and, on mature plants only, panicles of greenish-white flowers in summer followed by orange-red fruits

Plant range
Canary Islands

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Wow, what a strange tree, I like it!

Beautiful garden photography @ctrl-alt-nwo sir.
I like it your every garden photography and that's a beautiful plants photography. I appreciate your valuable content.your content is very interesting sir. I like it your every beautiful content. thank you so much sir for sharing this beautiful plants...

I love this plant very much
Shared on twitter.

Great post. Shared on twitter

Thank you @ctrl-alt-nwo! this is wonderful post. useful of Dragon Tree information . looking for trees hotel aria.
Resteem

Wow very wonderful Australia flower garden photography my best friend.
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Beautiful Australia flower garden photography sir.

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yes you are correct. It grows in relatively coarse grained soil and as near marine and oceans, the soils are coarse grained they can easily be grown and it quite resistant to dry atmosphere.

Wow ... never seen one of these before. Awesome.

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the characteristic of the dragon tree emits red sap, like blood which is very strange and unique. I like your post.

Wow this is great photography and it is really look dragon tree.so good information
Thanks @ctrl-alt-nwo
Have a great day

Preferred Scientific Name
Dracaena draco

Preferred Common Name
dragon tree

Taxonomic Tree
Domain: Eukaryota
Kingdom: Plantae
Phylum: Spermatophyta
Subphylum: Angiospermae
Class: Monocotyledonae

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