The unusual world of tipping.

in #busy2 years ago

I work in the restaurant industry. One of the most unusual things about the restaurant industry is that you have the option of whether or not you want to pay for the service that you receive.

There's literally no other field that I can think of in which you the customer have a choice as to whether or not the service that you've already been given should be paid for.


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Sometimes I hear someone say something like why should I tip that waiter? Nobody comes to my job and gives me a tip.

In a situation like that I always want to bite my tongue but I'm right on the edge of saying something like well do you get paid hourly? because we don't. Our entire salary is completely based on tips.

I even watched a guy one time get up and remove the tip from the table that his wife had left.

He explained that he wasn't about to pay someone for something that wasn't listed on the menu, and the cost of the service is not included in the price of the food.

Also, it's optional.

Tipping is optional.


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Even though we rely on tips to pay our rent, our bills, and pay for the food that we eat.... it's still completely optional.

Can you imagine if you decided not to pay the TV repairman? Maybe you decided that his work wasn't good enough to satisfy you.

Why should I pay the TV repairman? Nobody pays me whenever I end up working on the TV.

If paying him was optional I can definitely imagine people coming up with excuses to not do it.

It actually makes sense because we as a race are built to preserve our own well being.

On that note, we've decided that money is what helps us to persist, so therefore we must take care of our money almost as much as we would take care of our own children.

That's because taking care of our money means taking care of ourselves. It might even mean taking care of our children too.

So why give away money that you can keep? Why give money to a server that you can instead put in the mouths of your children?


GIphy

The reason is because you've been given a service.

It kind of amazes me that some people are not capable of giving a tip even though they are capable of spending a great deal of money.

Yesterday a friend of mine was waiting on a large party.

I think there were about 16 ladies. They had a big birthday cake, and they were all dressed in very colorful clothing with little hats, and the whole kit and caboodle.

On the way out one of the ladies looked at me and said something about how turned up they got, and how much fun they had, and that she was sorry if there was a big ruckus that rocked the house down.... or something like that.

I told her we live to serve. The truth is that we serve to live, but that's nothing that I really wanted to tell anybody.

My buddy was looking really upset and dejected so I assumed they did not tip very well.

How much?

$9 on a $300 bill.


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No, that's not a good tip..

The customary tip in the restaurant business is 20%.

That table ran my friend around constantly. He was always in one place or another taking an order, slicing up a cake, lighting a candle, picking up a high chair, and doing everything else that he possibly could do for these people.

He spent two hours running back and forth, back and forth, unable to do anything but help them and yet they gave him less than 5%.

He should have made $60 on that table.

Of course, not everything always goes the way that you want it to, and you have to prepare for that.

One thing I've always found really strange is that the more difficult someone is, the less likely they are to tip you well.


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If somebody comes in and they are cool as a cucumber....they are probably going to give you a good tip.

If somebody says just seat me anywhere, I don't care, I don't even care what you bring me. A hamburger, or a chicken sandwich, or a steak....it's all the same to me.... that is 30% easy.

If somebody says I'm going to need 5 high chairs, and please make sure to cut my food up for me. That is 2%.

The more work you do, the less you get paid.

Difficult people just don't pay well. The thing is, we remember your face when you come in to eat.

Do you think I want to wait on you when you had me running around for 2 hours and then gave me $2?

Why would I want to give away my time for free?

Keep in mind that we do not get paid by the hour.


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Technically we do get a couple of dollars, but that goes to pay our taxes.

We also have to pay out the bartender, hostess, and busboy. If you tip me $2 I probably will have to actually pay $5 meaning that I will have actually paid to wait on you.

The frustrating thing is that the holiday season used to mean big tips.

People are making less money but they still want to go out to eat.

How can you save money, but still have fun during the holiday season? Don't tip your server.

It's amazing to me that people can think like this, but that appears to be the general attitude and it gets worse every year.

We survive on tips.

We pay our rent with tips, we pay for childcare with tips, we pay for medical care with tips, we pay for food with tips.

Gas, electricity, clothing, anything else you can think of..... it is all paid for with money, and the money that we use comes from tips.

Tipping is a really unusual thing because everybody's really attached to their money.

However, if you receive a service and you think that service was good, then you should really pay for it.

Everybody deserves the chance to live a good life, and unfortunately money is what it takes to do that.

It definitely is an unusual world when it comes to tipping.

I must leave you on this note.

Please tip your server or bartender this holiday season.

Thank you very much.

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This is an interesting topic, I recently moved to Asia from the States. People view it completely differently here, people rarely tip, but when they do it's based on good-amazing service vs feeling obligated to tip for every meal. I think that the tipping wages part should be reviewed and give a standard wage, not forcing people to tip, and not making the waiter expecting a tip. A good video that I agree with is
"Why Tipping Should Be Banned - Adam Ruins Everything"

I think it's different all over the world. I'm going to check out that video.

I always tip
However, some establishments already calculate a tip(service charge) on the bill.
When I travel to Europe I always tip, even though it is not customary.
Caveat: This habit identifies you as an American.

It's true that some places already add in the tip. It kind of bothers me when they do that.

Coming from South Africa and having worked in the restaurant industry there I came to hate people who didn't tip. Most restaurants in South Africa don't pay wages not even a basic minimum wage and they almost always used the tips that waitstaff get as an excuse not to pay a wage. Everyone I worked with back then did their best to make money for the restaurant but a lot of the time it was in vein. It's all really sad.

It can definitely be a sad situation. I think people just don't understand that we don't get paid a basic wage.

lol. restaurants are not worth it.

La curiosidad en Venezuela es que se paga con tarjeta por la falta de efectivo. Si quieres premiar a alguien en concreto le pides su número de cuenta y haces una transferencia, por lo general suele ser el 10% y si el servicio es de tu agrado se puede dejar mucho más.

No soy camarero, pero supongo que tienen sueldos muy bajos para depender tanto de las propinas

I'd love to get this straight.
Waiters don't get paid a salary?

Most of them get paid a special wage that is greatly reduced (egregiously low) because tips are customary in that line of work. Wage laws are actually written this way and it's different in different areas.

Ok.
In my country tip is not significant because waiters (sales girls and boys) get paid, it's not a matter of contention unless when you go to some high-end places and the people there (not necessarilly waiters) feels they are entitled to your money or they won't serve you right.

I can't say for sure if the pay is good as there is no standard but it's normally comparable to what other regular folks earn unless your place is really small or your boss really greedy.

The laws that allow this have to change, and they only change if employees impose themselves to the bosses!
It is not the goodwill of the customers who have to pay for this service, but the boss of that waiter. The employer charged for the service to the clients, in this charge he must include the salary of the its employees.
In my country, although the waiters do not get paid on time and work long hours, they always know how much they will earn by the end of the day, and that salary is paid by the boss. The tips you can earn are an extra, never a salary!

Good post. I worked in a field where it's not customary to tip but received many anyways when I went above and beyond the normal call of duty. I always tip well and pass it forward to those "in the trenches." Another interesting point popped into my head though... I know a field where they can never seem to tell you what it will cost before the service is rendered and they just send you a bill a month or more later. This amount is pretty much what they decide it will be and can ruin your life. Any guesses?

I can think of quite a few fields that operate in the way you're mentioning.

I think TV, AC, and electrical repair would certainly be one of them since I have gotten bills much higher than I was quoted.

I was thinking of the medical field. It is exceedingly rare to get an accurate up front price all things considered.

It's necessary that we walk in someone else's shoes, and see if we would like to go through the same...

you should get paid by the hour. you should get paid by your employer! You live and work in a country where such practice is common. Sad.
I see tipping to be over and above the wages for good service, whether it is a waiter or a repairman, the mailman or the chimney sweep. But all should get a living wage and don't rely on charity, because that is what your employer counts on, that you work for him for free, he charges a high price for his food and then expects the customer to pay the staff wages on top of it!?
Well, only in America, Trumpland, the greatest country in the world, so they say! I am happily living in a civilized country where employers pay their employees, and not make them beg for scraps! But then again, where I live, we have Unions!
But I know how it is, I worked in restaurants myself, lucky for me, not in a country like the US. And you did not even mention that the taxman is "estimating" what you earn in tips. You might just have to pay taxes on money you didn't even get. Yeah, the "Greatest Country in the World"!

It definitely has some problems.

@tipu, tip! This server.

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Great post.
I am from the UK where tipping is not customary, due to the hourly wages, so when I moved to Canada understanding who I tip and how much to tip was tough. Do I tip a cab driver? Do I tip for take out?

I was always under the impression that you should start a server on 15% and increase or decrease the tip depending on the service you receive. More/better work means more money.
However, since moving in with a bartender I am now understanding that all servers should require a minimum 20% tip (He will not stray from that but I will still reduce it if the service has been so bad and I cannot see a valid reason to sympathize with the server i.e busy night and short staffed)

I also found out that tipping on the final bill is not always accurate as sometimes you are given a discount or are "comped" a drink (If you are a regular maybe or they fixed an issue with your meal) and a lot of people do not recognize that the discount reduces the final bill so the server is now reducing their tip too.
I always try to look at what the bill would have been, before the discount, and tip on that sub-total as you will still be saving money from the discount.

Great post on a very delicate topic.

#tipyourserverthisholidayseason

Great reply. Your bartender friend is on the money. We always strive for at least 20% and it's very important to make sure your tipping on the total price not including discounted price.

Oh gosh..... I am about to say several things and I hope none of them sound incredibly stoopid, but some of it might.

First, there shouldn't be a job that depends on voluntary tips from other people. Somehow this system may have made sense (or not) whenever someone first thought it up, but it seems amazingly insufficient now. Not that I know the answer for a solution short of you would get paid a fair hourly wage just like any other job.

Sometimes it may be a matter of misconception. In a day long ago, a tip was more understood as "an extra for good service" meaning that if you didn't think you got good service, leaving a small tip or none conveyed that sentiment and was incentive for the wait person to make good effort. As for today, it still matters to me about the level of service I am given. If someone doesn't give me decent service, I am not as inclined to want to pay the same tip as I would if I got good service. Yes.... I believe it is human nature in that regard. I am not someone that looks for a reason not to give a fair tip..... but it still matters.

I do know good service is given sometimes that is not rewarded properly and that is unkind. Unfortunately, the world doesn't seem to be getting kinder or less selfish. Most restaurants I am aware of, would add an automatic gratuity if the party were as large as your friend's, to make sure something like that does not happen.

Although I'm not sure how, today it is possible that some people don't understand that the tips are the majority of what the wait person makes. Unless someone knows someone in the industry or has just accidentally read about it, they may really not know. Although it has been many years now, I remember being astounded at what a low hourly wage a waiter or waitress was paid not counting tips. That never sounded right from day one to me and it still doesn't.

I have a friend in the industry who fortunately is blond, thin and bubbly, so in general, she makes a pretty good haul on tips in a chain steak house restaurant. That is the only reason I have been aware of this predicament.

One more thing..... a wait person's tips needing to cover a bartender, hostess and busboy blows my mind. There is a lot that does not seem right about that to me. I'm sure there is an inside view I don't know a bout, but that is entirely too many people's fingers in one person's tips. I hope one day there is a better way.

Awesome post, thanks ;)

MUY BIEN POST

SALUDOS :)

I think we are all entitled to our own opinion. As for me, if I am happy with the service given then tip them, if I didn't receive any smile at all then, i'm sorry i would pass tipping.

OH! I LOVE LOVE LOOOOOOOVE this!I Was Very Excited To See Your Post Great work ( awesome )

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