Latest Arxiv Papers In Astrophysics B |2019-03-08

in astrophysics •  17 days ago

The Latest Research Papers in Astrophysics

Cosmology And Nongalactic Astrophysics


Modified cosmology from extended entropy with varying exponent (1903.03098v1)

Shin'ichi Nojiri, Sergei D. Odintsov, Emmanuel N. Saridakis

2019-03-07

We present a modified cosmological scenario that arises from the application of non-extensive thermodynamics with varying exponent. We extract the modified Friedmann equations, which contain new terms quantified by the non-extensive exponent, possessing standard CDM cosmology as a subcase. Concerning the universe evolution at late times we obtain an effective dark energy sector, and we show that we can acquire the usual thermal history, with the successive sequence of matter and dark-energy epochs, with the effective dark-energy equation-of-state parameter being in the quintessence or in the phantom regime. The interesting feature of the scenario is that the above behaviors can be obtained even if the explicit cosmological constant is set to zero, namely they arise purely from the extra terms. Additionally, we confront the model with Supernovae type Ia and Hubble parameter observational data, and we show that the agreement is very good. Concerning the early-time universe we obtain inflationary de Sitter solutions, which are driven by an effective cosmological constant that includes the new terms of non-extensive thermodynamics. This effective screening can provide a description of both inflation and late-time acceleration with the same parameter choices, which is a significant advantage.

Discrete Cosmological Models in the Brans-Dicke Theory of Gravity (1903.03043v1)

Jessie Durk, Timothy Clifton

2019-03-07

We consider the problem of building inhomogeneous cosmological models in scalar-tensor theories of gravity. This starts by splitting the field equations of these theories into constraint and evolution equations, and then proceeds by identifying exact solutions to the constraints. We find exact, closed form expressions for geometries that correspond to the initial data for cosmological models containing regular arrays of point-like masses. These solutions extend similar methods that have recently been applied to Einstein's equations, and provides sufficient initial conditions to perform numerical integration of the evolution equations. We use our new solutions to study the effects of inhomogeneity in cosmologies governed by scalar-tensor theories of gravity, including the spatial inhomogeneity allowed in Newton's constant. Finally, we compare our solutions to their general relativistic counterparts, and investigate the effect of changing the coupling constant between the scalar and tensor degrees of freedom.

Einstein Yang-Mills Higgs dark energy revisited (1901.04624v2)

Miguel Alvarez, J. Bayron Orjuela-Quintana, Yeinzon Rodriguez, Cesar A. Valenzuela-Toledo

2019-01-15

Inspired in the Standard Model of Elementary Particles, the Einstein Yang-Mills Higgs action with the Higgs field in the SU(2) representation was proposed in Class. Quantum Grav. 32 (2015) 045002 as the element responsible for the dark energy phenomenon. We revisit this action emphasizing in a very important aspect not sufficiently explored in the original work and that substantially changes its conclusions. This aspect is the role that the Yang-Mills Higgs interaction plays at fixing the gauge for the Higgs field, in order to sustain a homogeneous and isotropic background, and at driving the late accelerated expansion of the Universe by moving the Higgs field away of the minimum of its potential and holding it towards an asymptotic finite value. We analyse the dynamical behaviour of this system and supplement this analysis with a numerical solution whose initial conditions are in agreement with the current observed values for the density parameters. This scenario represents a step towards a successful merging of cosmology and well-tested particle physics phenomenology.

Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter: Concepts and Status (1903.03026v1)

Marc Schumann

2019-03-07

The existence of dark matter as evidenced by numerous indirect observations is one of the most important indications that there must be physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. This article reviews the concepts of direct detection of dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in ultra-sensitive detectors located in underground laboratories, discusses the expected signatures, detector concepts, and how the stringent low-background requirements are achieved. Finally, it summarizes the current status of the field and provides an outlook on the years to come.

Effect of nonlinearity between density and curvature perturbations on the primordial black hole formation (1903.02994v1)

Masahiro Kawasaki, Hiromasa Nakatsuka

2019-03-07

We study the effect of the nonlinear relation between density and curvature perturbations on the formation of PBHs. By calculating the variance and skewness of the density perturbation we derive the non-Gaussian property. As a criterion for PBH formation, the compaction function is used and it is found that larger curvature perturbations are required due to the nonlinear effect. We estimate the PBH abundance based on the Press-Schechter formalism with non-Gaussian probability density function during Radiation dominated era. It is found that the nonlinear effect slightly suppresses the PBH formation and the suppression is comparable to that expected if the primordial curvature perturbation would have the local form of non-Gaussianity with nonlinear parameter .

High Energy Astrophysical Phenomena


The Population of Eccentric Binary Black Holes: Implications for mHz Gravitational Wave Experiments (1901.05092v2)

Xiao Fang, Todd A. Thompson, Christopher M. Hirata

2019-01-16

The observed binary black hole (BBH) mergers indicate a large Galactic progenitor population continuously evolving from large orbital separations and low gravitational wave (GW) frequencies to the final merger phase. We investigate the equilibrium distribution of binary black holes in the Galaxy. Given the observed BBH merger rate, we contrast the expected number of systems radiating in the low-frequency mHz GW band under two assumptions: (1) that all merging systems originate from near-circular orbits, as may be indicative of isolated binary evolution, and (2) that all merging systems originate at very high eccentricity, as predicted by models of dynamically-formed BBHs and triple and quadruple systems undergoing Lidov-Kozai eccentricity oscillations. We show that the equilibrium number of systems expected at every frequency is higher in the eccentric case (2) than in the circular case (1) by a factor of . This follows from the fact that eccentric systems spend more time than circular systems radiating in the low-frequency GW bands. The GW emission comes in pulses at periastron separated by the orbital period, which may be days to years. For a LISA-like sensitivity curve, we show that if eccentric systems contribute significantly to the observed merger rate, then eccentric systems should be seen in the Galaxy.

Evidence for recent GeV brightening of the SN 1987A region (1903.03045v1)

Denys Malyshev, Gerd Pühlhofer, Andrea Santangelo, Jacco Vink

2019-03-07

We report on a recent (2016-2018) enhancement of the GeV emission from the SN 1987A region as observed with Fermi/LAT. The observed signal is characterised by a power-law spectrum with a slope of 2.1 +/- 0.2 and is detected only at energies >1 GeV. The Fermi/LAT data constrain the position of the signal to within 0.15 degree around SN 1987A. Although a recent increase in the gamma-ray emission from SN 1987A seems to be a natural explanation for the detected emission, given the youth of the source and its rapid evolution, the Fermi/LAT location also overlaps with several other potential gamma-ray sources: 30 Dor C, Honeycomb nebula, RX J0536.9-6913, and a hypothetical, previously unknown transient source. We argue that multiwavelength observations of the region performed during the next few years can clarify the nature of the signal and encourage such observations. We also present upper limits on the time-averaged flux of SN 1987A based on 10 years of Fermi/LAT exposure, which can be used to better constrain the particle acceleration models of this source.

STROBE-X: X-ray Timing and Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years (1903.03035v1)

Paul S. Ray, Zaven Arzoumanian, David Ballantyne, Enrico Bozzo, Soren Brandt, Laura Brenneman, Deepto Chakrabarty, Marc Christophersen, Alessandra DeRosa, Marco Feroci, Keith Gendreau, Adam Goldstein, Dieter Hartmann, Margarita Hernanz, Peter Jenke, Erin Kara, Tom Maccarone, Michael McDonald, Michael Nowak, Bernard Phlips, Ron Remillard, Abigail Stevens, John Tomsick, Anna Watts, Colleen Wilson-Hodge, Kent Wood, Silvia Zane

2019-03-07

We present the Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X), a probe-class mission concept selected for study by NASA. It combines huge collecting area, high throughput, broad energy coverage, and excellent spectral and temporal resolution in a single facility. STROBE-X offers an enormous increase in sensitivity for X-ray spectral timing, extending these techniques to extragalactic targets for the first time. It is also an agile mission capable of rapid response to transient events, making it an essential X-ray partner facility in the era of time-domain, multi-wavelength, and multi-messenger astronomy. Optimized for study of the most extreme conditions found in the Universe, its key science objectives include: (1) Robustly measuring mass and spin and mapping inner accretion flows across the black hole mass spectrum, from compact stars to intermediate-mass objects to active galactic nuclei. (2) Mapping out the full mass-radius relation of neutron stars using an ensemble of nearly two dozen rotation-powered pulsars and accreting neutron stars, and hence measuring the equation of state for ultradense matter over a much wider range of densities than explored by NICER. (3) Identifying and studying X-ray counterparts (in the post-Swift era) for multiwavelength and multi-messenger transients in the dynamic sky through cross-correlation with gravitational wave interferometers, neutrino observatories, and high-cadence time-domain surveys in other electromagnetic bands. (4) Continuously surveying the dynamic X-ray sky with a large duty cycle and high time resolution to characterize the behavior of X-ray sources over an unprecedentedly vast range of time scales. STROBE-X's formidable capabilities will also enable a broad portfolio of additional science.

Exploring the role of X-ray reprocessing and irradiation in the anomalous bright optical outbursts of A0538-66 (1903.02918v1)

L. Ducci, S. Mereghetti, K. Hryniewicz, A. Santangelo, P. Romano

2019-03-07

In 1981, the Be/X-ray binary (Be/XRB) A0538-66 showed outbursts characterized by high peak luminosities in the X-ray and optical bands. The optical outbursts were qualitatively explained as X-ray reprocessing in a gas cloud surrounding the binary system. Since then, further important information about A0538-66 have been obtained, and sophisticated photoionization codes have been developed to calculate the radiation emerging from a gas nebula illuminated by a central X-ray source. In the light of the new information and tools available, we studied again the enhanced optical emission displayed by A0538-66 to understand the mechanisms responsible for these unique events among the class of Be/XRBs. We performed about 10^5 simulations of a gas envelope photoionized by an X-ray source. We assumed for the shape of the gas cloud either a sphere or a circumstellar disc observed edge-on. We studied the effects of varying the main properties of the envelope and the influence of different input X-ray spectra on the optical/UV emission emerging from the photoionized cloud. We compared the computed spectra with the IUE spectrum and photometric UBV measurements obtained during the outburst of 29 April 1981. We also explored the role played by the X-ray heating of the surface of the donor star irradiated by the X-ray emission of the neutron star (NS). We found that reprocessing in a spherical cloud with a shallow radial density distribution can reproduce the optical/UV emission. To our knowledge, this configuration has never been observed either in A0538-66 during other epochs or in other Be/XRBs. We found, contrary to the case of most other Be/XRBs, that the optical/UV radiation produced by the X-ray heating of the surface of the donor star irradiated by the NS is non-negligible, due to the particular orbital parameters of this system that bring the NS very close to its companion.

A Search for Cosmic-ray Proton Anisotropy with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (1903.02905v1)

The Fermi-LAT Collaboration

2019-03-07

The Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has amassed a large data set of primary cosmic-ray protons throughout its mission. The LAT's wide field of view and full-sky survey capabilities make it an excellent instrument for studying cosmic-ray anisotropy. As a space-based survey instrument, the LAT is sensitive to anisotropy in both right ascension and declination, while ground-based observations only measure the anisotropy in right ascension. We present the results of the first ever proton anisotropy search using Fermi LAT. The data set uses eight years of data and consists of approximately 179 million protons above 78 GeV, enabling it to probe dipole anisotropy below an amplitude of , resulting in the most stringent limits on the declination dependence of the dipole to date. We measure a dipole amplitude with a p-value of 0.01 (pre-trials) for protons with a minimum energy of 78 GeV. We discuss various systematic effects that could give rise to a dipole excess and calculate upper limits on the dipole amplitude as a function of minimum energy. The 95% CL upper limit on the dipole amplitude is for protons with a minimum energy of 78 GeV and for protons with a minimum energy of 251 GeV.

Instrumentation And Methods In Astrophysics


STROBE-X: X-ray Timing and Spectroscopy on Dynamical Timescales from Microseconds to Years (1903.03035v1)

Paul S. Ray, Zaven Arzoumanian, David Ballantyne, Enrico Bozzo, Soren Brandt, Laura Brenneman, Deepto Chakrabarty, Marc Christophersen, Alessandra DeRosa, Marco Feroci, Keith Gendreau, Adam Goldstein, Dieter Hartmann, Margarita Hernanz, Peter Jenke, Erin Kara, Tom Maccarone, Michael McDonald, Michael Nowak, Bernard Phlips, Ron Remillard, Abigail Stevens, John Tomsick, Anna Watts, Colleen Wilson-Hodge, Kent Wood, Silvia Zane

2019-03-07

We present the Spectroscopic Time-Resolving Observatory for Broadband Energy X-rays (STROBE-X), a probe-class mission concept selected for study by NASA. It combines huge collecting area, high throughput, broad energy coverage, and excellent spectral and temporal resolution in a single facility. STROBE-X offers an enormous increase in sensitivity for X-ray spectral timing, extending these techniques to extragalactic targets for the first time. It is also an agile mission capable of rapid response to transient events, making it an essential X-ray partner facility in the era of time-domain, multi-wavelength, and multi-messenger astronomy. Optimized for study of the most extreme conditions found in the Universe, its key science objectives include: (1) Robustly measuring mass and spin and mapping inner accretion flows across the black hole mass spectrum, from compact stars to intermediate-mass objects to active galactic nuclei. (2) Mapping out the full mass-radius relation of neutron stars using an ensemble of nearly two dozen rotation-powered pulsars and accreting neutron stars, and hence measuring the equation of state for ultradense matter over a much wider range of densities than explored by NICER. (3) Identifying and studying X-ray counterparts (in the post-Swift era) for multiwavelength and multi-messenger transients in the dynamic sky through cross-correlation with gravitational wave interferometers, neutrino observatories, and high-cadence time-domain surveys in other electromagnetic bands. (4) Continuously surveying the dynamic X-ray sky with a large duty cycle and high time resolution to characterize the behavior of X-ray sources over an unprecedentedly vast range of time scales. STROBE-X's formidable capabilities will also enable a broad portfolio of additional science.

Direct Detection of WIMP Dark Matter: Concepts and Status (1903.03026v1)

Marc Schumann

2019-03-07

The existence of dark matter as evidenced by numerous indirect observations is one of the most important indications that there must be physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. This article reviews the concepts of direct detection of dark matter in the form of Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in ultra-sensitive detectors located in underground laboratories, discusses the expected signatures, detector concepts, and how the stringent low-background requirements are achieved. Finally, it summarizes the current status of the field and provides an outlook on the years to come.

Radio detection of atmospheric air showers of particles (1903.02889v1)

Antony Escudie, Richard Dallier, Didier Charrier, Daniel García-Fernández, Alain Lecacheux, Lilian Martin, Benoît Revenu

2019-03-07

Since 2002, the CODALEMA experiment located within the Nan\c{c}ay Radio Observatory studies the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (above 10^{17} eV) arriving in the Earth atmosphere. These cosmic rays interact with the component of the atmosphere, inducing an extensive air shower (EAS) composed mainly of charged particles (electrons and positrons). During the development of the shower in the atmosphere, these charged particles in movement generate a fast electric field transient (a few nanoseconds to a few tens of ns), detected at ground by CODALEMA with dedicated radio antennas over a wide frequency band (between 20 MHz and 200 MHz). The study of this electric field emitted during the shower development aims to determine the characteristics of the primary cosmic ray which has induced the particle shower: its nature, its arrival direction and its energy. After some theoretical considerations and a short description of the SELFAS simulation code, we will present the CODALEMA experiment, its performances and main results. At last, we will show how the EAS radio-detection technique could be used to observe very high energy gamma rays sources, with the NenuFAR radio telescope.

Looking for ancillary signals around GW150914 (1903.02823v1)

Rahul Maroju, Sristi Ram Dyuthi, Anumandla Sukrutha, Shantanu Desai

2019-03-07

We replicated the procedure in Liu and Jackson (arXiv:1609.08346), who had found evidence for a low amplitude signal in the vicinity of GW150914. This was based upon the large correlation between the time integral of the Pearson cross-correlation coefficient in the off-source region of GW150914, and the Pearson cross-correlation in a narrow window around GW150914, for the same time lag between the two LIGO detectors as the gravitational wave signal. Our results mostly agree with those in arXiv:1609.08346. However, we also find a high value for this cross-correlation for time lags antipodal to those seen for GW150914. We also used the cross-correlation method to search for short duration signals at all other physical values of the time lag, within this 4096 second time interval, but do not find evidence for any statistically significant events in the off-source region.

Noise residuals for GW150914 using maximum likelihood and numerical relativity templates (1903.02401v2)

Andrew D. Jackson, Hao Liu, Pavel Naselsky

2019-03-06

We reexamine the results presented in a recent work by Nielsen et al. [1], in which the properties of the noise residuals in the 40,ms chirp domain of GW150914 were investigated. This paper confirmed the presence of strong (i.e., about 0.80) correlations between residual noise in the Hanford and Livingston detectors in the chirp domain as previously seen by us [2] when using a numerical relativity template given in [3]. It was also shown in [1] that a so-called maximum likelihood template can reduce these statistically significant cross-correlations. Here, we demonstrate that the reduction of correlation and statistical significance is due to (i) the use of a peculiar template which is qualitatively different from the properties of GW150914 originally published by LIGO, (ii) a suspicious MCMC chain, (iii) uncertainties in the matching of the maximum likelihood (ML) template to the data in the Fourier domain, and (iv) a biased estimation of the significance that gives counter-intuitive results. We show that rematching the maximum likelihood template to the data in the 0.2,s domain containing the GW150914 signal restores these correlations at the level of of those found in [1]. With necessary corrections, the probability given in [1] will decrease by more than one order of magnitude. Since the ML template is itself problematic, results associated with this template are illustrative rather than final.



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