Latest Arxiv Papers In Astrophysics A |2019-03-06

in astrophysics •  14 days ago

The Latest Research Papers in Astrophysics

Astrophysics Of Galaxies


The star clusters that make black hole binaries across cosmic time (1809.01164v2)

Nick Choksi, Marta Volonteri, Monica Colpi, Oleg Y. Gnedin, Hui Li

2018-09-04

We explore the properties of dense star clusters that are likely to be the nurseries of stellar black holes pairing in close binaries. We combine a cosmological model of globular cluster formation with analytic prescriptions for the dynamical assembly and evolution of black hole binaries to constrain which types of clusters are most likely to form binaries tight enough to coalesce within a Hubble time. We find that black hole binaries which are ejected and later merge ex-situ form in clusters of a characteristic mass , whereas binaries which merge in-situ form in more massive clusters, . The clusters which dominate the production of black hole binaries are similar in age and metallicity to the entire population. Finally, we estimate an approximate cosmic black hole merger rate of dynamically assembled binaries using the mean black hole mass for each cluster given its metallicity. We find an intrinsic rate of at , a weakly increasing merger rate out to , and then a decrease out to . Our results can be used to provide a cosmological context and choose initial conditions in numerical studies of black hole binaries assembled in star clusters.

The nature of GRB host galaxies from chemical abundances (1903.01353v1)

Marco Palla, Francesca Matteucci, Francesco Calura, Francesco Longo

2019-03-04

We try to identify the nature of high redshift long Gamma-Ray Bursts (LGRBs) host galaxies by comparing the observed abundance ratios in the interstellar medium with detailed chemical evolution models accounting for the presence of dust. We compared measured abundance data from LGRB afterglow spectra to abundance patterns as predicted by our models for different galaxy types. We analysed in particular [X/Fe] abundance ratios (where X is C, N, O, Mg, Si, S, Ni, Zn) as functions of [Fe/H]. Different galaxies (irregulars, spirals, ellipticals) are, in fact, characterised by different star formation histories, which produce different [X/Fe] ratios ("time-delay model"). This allows us to identify the morphology of the hosts and to infer their age (i.e. the time elapsed from the beginning of star formation) at the time of the GRB events, as well as other important parameters. Relative to previous works, we use newer models in which we adopt updated stellar yields and prescriptions for dust production, accretion and destruction. We have considered a sample of seven LGRB host galaxies. Our results have suggested that two of them (GRB 050820, GRB 120815A) are ellipticals, two (GRB 081008, GRB 161023A) are spirals and three (GRB 050730, GRB 090926A, GRB 120327A) are irregulars. We also found that in some cases changing the initial mass function can give better agreement with the observed data. The calculated ages of the host galaxies span from the order of 10 Myr to little more than 1 Gyr.

Massive runaways and walkaway stars (1804.09164v2)

M. Renzo, E. Zapartas, S. E. de Mink, Y. Götberg, S. Justham, R. J. Farmer, R. G. Izzard, S. Toonen, H. Sana

2018-04-24

Anticipating the kinematic constraints from the Gaia mission, we perform an extensive numerical study of the evolution of massive binary systems to predict the peculiar velocities that stars obtain when their companion collapses and disrupts the system. Our aim is to (1) identify which predictions are robust against model uncertainties and assess their implications, (2) investigate which physical processes leave a clear imprint and may therefore be constrained observationally and (3) provide a suite of publicly available model predictions. We find that % of all massive binary systems merge prior to the first core collapse in the system. Of the remainder, % become unbound because of the core-collapse. Remarkably, this rarely produce runaway stars (i.e., stars with velocities above 30 km/s). These are outnumbered by more than an order of magnitude by slower unbound companions, or "walkaway stars". This is a robust outcome of our simulations and is due to the reversal of the mass ratio prior to the explosion and widening of the orbit, as we show analytically and numerically. We estimate a % of massive stars to be walkaways and only % to be runaways, nearly all of which have accreted mass from their companion. Our findings are consistent with earlier studies, however the low runaway fraction we find is in tension with observed fractions 10%. If Gaia confirms these high fractions of massive runaway stars resulting from binaries, it would imply that we are currently missing physics in the binary models. Finally, we show that high end of the mass distributions of runaway stars is very sensitive to the assumed black hole natal kicks and propose this as a potentially stringent test for the explosion mechanism. We discuss companions remaining bound which can evolve into X-ray and gravitational wave sources.

The seeds of supermassive black holes and the role of local radiation and metal spreading (1811.01964v2)

U. Maio, S. Borgani, B. Ciardi, M. Petkova

2018-11-05

We present cosmological hydrodynamical simulations including atomic and molecular non-equilibrium chemistry, multi-frequency radiative transfer (0.7-100 eV sampled over 150 frequency bins) and stellar population evolution to investigate the host candidates of the seeds of supermassive black holes coming from direct collapse of gas in primordial haloes (direct-collapse black holes, DCBHs). We consistently address the role played by atomic and molecular cooling, stellar radiation and metal spreading of C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ca, Fe, etc. from primordial sources, as well as their implications for nearby quiescent proto-galaxies under different assumptions for early source emissivity, initial mass function and metal yields. We find that putative DCBH host candidates need powerful primordial stellar generations, since common solar-like stars and hot OB-type stars are neither able to determine the conditions for direct collapse nor capable of building up a dissociating Lyman-Werner background radiation field. Thermal and molecular features of the identified DCBH host candidates in the scenario with very massive primordial stars seem favourable, with illuminating Lyman-Werner intensities featuring values of 1-50 J21. Nevertheless, additional non-linear processes, such as merger events, substructure formation, rotational motions and photo-evaporation, should inhibit pure DCBH formation in 2/3 of the cases. Local turbulence may delay gas direct collapse almost irrespectively from other environmental conditions. The impact of large Lyman-Werner fluxes at distances smaller than 5 kpc is severely limited by metal pollution.

A New, Larger Sample of Supernova Remnants in NGC 6946 (1903.01318v1)

Knox S. Long, P. Frank Winkler, William P. Blair

2019-03-04

The relatively nearby spiral galaxy NGC~6946 is one of the most actively star forming galaxies in the local Universe. Ten supernovae (SNe) have been observed since 1917, and hence NGC6946 surely contains a large number of supernova remnants (SNRs). Here we report a new optical search for these SNRs using narrow-band images obtained with the WIYN telescope. We identify 147 emission nebulae as likely SNRs, based on elevated [SII]:Halpha ratios compared to HII regions. We have obtained spectra of 102 of these nebulae with Gemini North-GMOS; of these, 89 have [SII]:Halpha ratios greater than 0.4, the canonical optical criterion for identifying SNRs. There is very little overlap between our sample and the SNR candidates identified by Lacey et al. (2001) from radio data. Also, very few of our SNR candidates are known X-ray sources, unlike the situation in some other galaxies such as M33 and M83. The emission line ratios, e.g., [NII]:Halpha, of the candidates in NGC6946 are typical of those observed in SNR samples from other galaxies with comparable metallicity. None of the candidates observed in our low-resolution spectra show evidence of anomalous abundances or significant velocity broadening. A search for emission at the sites of all the historical SNe in NGC6946 resulted in detections for only two: SN1980K and SN2004et. Spectra of both show very broad, asymmetric line profiles, consistent with the interaction between SN ejecta and the progenitor star's circumstellar material, as seen in late spectra from other core-collapse SNe of similar age.

Earth And Planetary Astrophysics


Obliquity-Driven Sculpting of Exoplanetary Systems (1903.01386v1)

Sarah Millholland, Gregory Laughlin

2019-03-04

NASA's Kepler mission revealed that of Solar-type stars harbor planets with sizes between that of Earth and Neptune on nearly circular and co-planar orbits with periods less than 100 days. Such short-period compact systems are rarely found with planet pairs in mean-motion resonances (MMRs) -- configurations in which the planetary orbital periods exhibit a simple integer ratio -- but there is a significant overabundance of planet pairs lying just wide of the first-order resonances. Previous work suggests that tides raised on the planets by the host star may be responsible for forcing systems into these configurations by draining orbital energy to heat. Such tides, however, are insufficient unless there exists a substantial and as-yet unidentified source of extra dissipation. Here we show that this cryptic heat source may be linked to "obliquity tides" generated when a large axial tilt (obliquity) is maintained by secular resonance-driven spin-orbit coupling. We present evidence that typical compact, nearly-coplanar systems frequently experience this mechanism, and we highlight additional features in the planetary orbital period and radius distributions that may be its signatures. Extrasolar planets that maintain large obliquities will exhibit infrared light curve features that are detectable with forthcoming space missions. The observed period ratio distribution can be explained if typical tidal quality factors for super-Earths and sub-Neptunes are similar to those of Uranus and Neptune.

Erratum: A library of ATMO forward model transmission spectra for hot Jupiter exoplanets (1710.10269v3)

Jayesh M. Goyal, Nathan Mayne, David K. Sing, Benjamin Drummond, Pascal Tremblin, David S. Amundsen, Thomas Evans, Aarynn L. Carter, Jessica Spake, Isabelle Baraffe, Nikolay Nikolov, James Manners, Gilles Chabrier, Eric Hebrard

2017-10-27

In the original manuscript arXiv:1710.10269, we presented a grid of forward model transmission spectra for hot Jupiter exoplanets. However, we recently identified an error in the treatment of rainout in our 1D atmosphere model ATMO. We explain the error, the correction, its validation and the changed conclusions in this erratum. The correction of this error led to changes in the equilibrium chemical abundances using rainout condensation and thereby the transmission spectra. We note that this error only affects the online library that includes rainout condensation, the library with local condensation (without rainout) is unaffected. The online library was updated with the correction in July 2018.

3D analysis of spatial resolution of MIRO/Rosetta measurements at 67P/CG (1903.01300v1)

L. Rezac, Y. Zhao, P. Hartogh, J. Ji, D. Marshall, X. Shi

2019-03-04

The MIRO instrument's remote sensing capability is integral in constraining water density, temperature and velocity fields in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gersimenko. Our aim is to quantify the contribution to the water density from all facets inside and outside the field-of-view (FOV) of MIRO, in both, nadir and limb geometries. This information is crucial for understanding the MIRO derived coma production rates and their relation to the nucleus characteristics, and inherent spatial resolution of the data. This study relies on a detailed 3D nucleus shape model, illumination conditions and the pointing information of the viewing geometry. With these parameters, we can evaluate the relative contribution of water density originating from facets directly inside the MIRO beam as well outside of the beam as a function of distance along the MIRO line-of-sight. We also calculate the ratio of in-beam versus out-of-beam number density. We demonstrate that despite the rather small MIRO field-of-view there is only a small fraction of molecules that originate from facets within the MIRO beam. This is true for nadir, but also translated into the limb observing geometry. The MIRO instrument cannot discriminate active from non-active regions directly from observations. This study also suggests that the beam averaged solar incidence angle, local time and mean normal vectors are not necessary related to molecules within the MIRO beam. These results also illustrate why the 1D spherical Haser model can be applied with relative success for analyzing the MIRO data (and generally any Rosetta measurements). The future possibilities of constraining gas activity distribution on the surface should use 3D codes extracting information from the MIRO spectral line shapes which contain additional information. The presented results are in fact applicable to all relevant instruments onboard Rosetta.

Flattened loose particles from numerical simulations compared to Rosetta collected particles (1903.01206v1)

Jeremie Lasue, Isabelle Maroger, Robert Botet, Philippe Garnier, Sihane Merouane, Thurid Mannel, Anny-Chantal Levasseur-Regourd, Mark Bentley

2019-03-04

Cometary dust particles are remnants of the primordial accretion of refractory material that occurred during the initial stages of the Solar System formation. Understanding their physical structure can help constrain their accretion process. We have developed a simple numerical simulation of aggregate impact flattening to interpret the properties of particles collected by COSIMA. The aspect ratios of flattened particles from both simulations and observations are compared to differentiate between initial families of aggregates characterized by different fractal dimensions . This dimension can differentiate between certain growth modes. The diversity of aspect ratios measured by COSIMA is consistent with either two families of aggregates with different initial (a family of compact aggregates with fractal dimensions close to 2.5-3 and some fluffier aggregates with fractal dimensions around 2). Alternatively, the distribution of morphologies seen by COSIMA could originate from a single type of aggregation process, such as DLPA, but to explain the range of aspect ratios observed by COSIMA a large range of dust particle cohesive strength is necessary. Furthermore, variations in cohesive strength and velocity may play a role in the higher aspect ratio range detected (>0.3). Our work allows us to explain the particle morphologies observed by COSIMA and those generated by laboratory experiments in a consistent framework. Taking into account all observations from the three dust instruments on-board Rosetta, we favor an interpretation of our simulations based on two different families of dust particles with significantly distinct fractal dimensions ejected from the cometary nucleus.

Connecting substellar and stellar formation. The role of the host star's metallicity (1903.01141v1)

J. Maldonado, E. Villaver, C. Eiroa, G. Micela

2019-03-04

Most of our current understanding of the planet formation mechanism is based on the planet metallicity correlation derived mostly from solar-type stars harbouring gas-giant planets. To achieve a far more reaching grasp on the substellar formation process we aim to analyse in terms of their metallicity a diverse sample of stars (in terms of mass and spectral type) covering the whole range of possible outcomes of the planet formation process (from planetesimals to brown dwarfs and low-mass binaries). Our methodology is based on the use of high-precision stellar parameters derived by our own group in previous works from high-resolution spectra by using the iron ionisation and equilibrium conditions. All values are derived in an homogeneous way, except for the M dwarfs where a methodology based on the use of pseudo equivalent widths of spectral features was used. Our results show that as the mass of the substellar companion increases the metallicity of the host star tendency is to lower values. The same trend is maintained when analysing stars with low-mass stellar companions and a tendency towards a wide range of host star's metallicity is found for systems with low mass planets. We also confirm that more massive planets tend to orbit around more massive stars. The core-accretion formation mechanism for planet formation achieves its maximum efficiency for planets with masses in the range 0.2 and 2 M. Substellar objects with higher masses have higher probabilities of being formed as stars. Low-mass planets and planetesimals might be formed by core-accretion even around low-metallicity stars.

Solar And Stellar Astrophysics


Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA): Pulsating Variable Stars, Rotation, Convective Boundaries, and Energy Conservation (1903.01426v1)

Bill Paxton, R. Smolec, A. Gautschy, Lars Bildsten, Matteo Cantiello, Aaron Dotter, R. Farmer, Jared A. Goldberg, Adam S. Jermyn, S. M. Kanbur, Pablo Marchant, Josiah Schwab, Anne Thoul, Richard H. D. Townsend, William M. Wolf, Michael Zhang, F. X. Timmes

2019-03-04

We update the capabilities of the open-knowledge software instrument Modules for Experiments in Stellar Astrophysics (MESA). RSP is a new functionality in MESAstar that models the non-linear radial stellar pulsations that characterize RR Lyrae, Cepheids, and other classes of variable stars. We significantly enhance numerical energy conservation capabilities, including during mass changes. For example, this enables calculations through the He flash that conserve energy to better than 0.001 %. To improve the modeling of rotating stars in MESA, we introduce a new approach to modifying the pressure and temperature equations of stellar structure, and a formulation of the projection effects of gravity darkening. A new scheme for tracking convective boundaries yields reliable values of the convective-core mass, and allows the natural emergence of adiabatic semiconvection regions during both core hydrogen- and helium-burning phases. We quantify the parallel performance of MESA on current generation multicore architectures and demonstrate improvements in the computational efficiency of radiative levitation. We report updates to the equation of state and nuclear reaction physics modules. We briefly discuss the current treatment of fallback in core-collapse supernova models and the thermodynamic evolution of supernova explosions. We close by discussing the new MESA Testhub software infrastructure to enhance source-code development.

CAFE-PakalMPI: a new model to study the solar chromosphere in the NLTE approximation (1808.07817v2)

J. J. González-Avilés, V. De la Luz

2018-08-23

We present a new numerical model called CAFE-PakalMPI with the capability to solve the equations of classical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and to obtain the multispecies whose ionization states are calculated through statistical equilibrium, using the approximation of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) in three dimensions with the multiprocessor environment. For this, we couple the Newtonian CAFE MHD code introduced in Gonz'alez-Avil'es et al. (2015) with PakalMPI presented in De la Luz et al. (2010). In this model, Newtonian CAFE solves the equations of ideal MHD under the effects of magnetic resistivity and heat transfer considering a fully ionized plasma. On the other hand, PakalMPI calculates the density of ionization states using the NLTE approximation for Hydrogen, electronic densities and H-, the other species are computed by the classical local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation. The main purpose of the model focuses on the analysis of solar phenomena within the chromospheric region. As an application of the model, we study the stability of the C7 equilibrium atmospheric model with a constant magnetic field in a 3D environment. According to the results of the test, the C7 model remains stable in the low chromosphere, while in the range [1.5,2.1] Mm we can observe the propagation of a wave produced by the changes in the ionization rate of H.

Massive runaways and walkaway stars (1804.09164v2)

M. Renzo, E. Zapartas, S. E. de Mink, Y. Götberg, S. Justham, R. J. Farmer, R. G. Izzard, S. Toonen, H. Sana

2018-04-24

Anticipating the kinematic constraints from the Gaia mission, we perform an extensive numerical study of the evolution of massive binary systems to predict the peculiar velocities that stars obtain when their companion collapses and disrupts the system. Our aim is to (1) identify which predictions are robust against model uncertainties and assess their implications, (2) investigate which physical processes leave a clear imprint and may therefore be constrained observationally and (3) provide a suite of publicly available model predictions. We find that % of all massive binary systems merge prior to the first core collapse in the system. Of the remainder, % become unbound because of the core-collapse. Remarkably, this rarely produce runaway stars (i.e., stars with velocities above 30 km/s). These are outnumbered by more than an order of magnitude by slower unbound companions, or "walkaway stars". This is a robust outcome of our simulations and is due to the reversal of the mass ratio prior to the explosion and widening of the orbit, as we show analytically and numerically. We estimate a % of massive stars to be walkaways and only % to be runaways, nearly all of which have accreted mass from their companion. Our findings are consistent with earlier studies, however the low runaway fraction we find is in tension with observed fractions 10%. If Gaia confirms these high fractions of massive runaway stars resulting from binaries, it would imply that we are currently missing physics in the binary models. Finally, we show that high end of the mass distributions of runaway stars is very sensitive to the assumed black hole natal kicks and propose this as a potentially stringent test for the explosion mechanism. We discuss companions remaining bound which can evolve into X-ray and gravitational wave sources.

Rotating Parker wind (1811.10777v2)

Maxim Lyutikov

2018-11-27

We reconsider the structure of thermally driven rotating Parker wind. Rotation, without \Bf, changes qualitatively the structure of the subsonic region: solutions become non-monotonic and do not extend to the origin. For small angular velocities solutions have two critical points - X-point and O-points, which merge at the critical angular velocity of the central star (where and are mass and radius of the central star, is the sound speed in the wind). For larger spins there is no critical points in the solution. For disk winds (when the base of the wind rotates with Keplerian velocity) launched equatorially the coronal sound speed should be smaller than in order to connect to the critical curve ( is the Keplerian velocity at a given location on the disk).

Persistent Quasi-Periodic Pulsations During a Large X-Class Solar Flare (1903.01328v1)

Laura A. Hayes, Peter T. Gallagher, Brian R. Dennis, Jack Ireland, Andrew Inglis, Diana E. Morosan

2019-03-04

Solar flares often display pulsating and oscillatory signatures in the emission, known as quasi-periodic pulsations (QPP). QPP are typically identified during the impulsive phase of flares, yet in some cases, their presence is detected late into the decay phase. Here, we report extensive fine structure QPP that are detected throughout the large X8.2 flare from 2017 September 10. Following the analysis of the thermal pulsations observed in the GOES/XRS and the 131 A channel of SDO/AIA, we find a pulsation period of ~65 s during the impulsive phase followed by lower amplitude QPP with a period of ~150 s in the decay phase, up to three hours after the peak of the flare. We find that during the time of the impulsive QPP, the soft X-ray source observed with RHESSI rapidly rises at a velocity of approximately 17 km/s following the plasmoid/coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption. We interpret these QPP in terms of a manifestation of the reconnection dynamics in the eruptive event. During the long-duration decay phase lasting several hours, extended downward contractions of collapsing loops/plasmoids that reach the top of the flare arcade are observed in EUV. We note that the existence of persistent QPP into the decay phase of this flare are most likely related to these features. The QPP during this phase are discussed in terms of MHD wave modes triggered in the post-flaring loops.



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