Birds Nest Fern - not just for the empty-nesters.steemCreated with Sketch.

in #asplenium2 years ago

The Birds Nest Fern is native to several warmer climate countries including Australia. It's Botanical name is Asplenium nidus, and there are several species including one with forked fronds. This plant is an Epiphyte in it's natural habitat, meaning that spores ( like small seeds ) lodge and germinate in places like the forks of trees that offer good support, where they grow, and the rosette of fronds collect falling leaves, birds droppings, dead insects etc and these provide nutrients for the plant. Natural rainfall provides water and helps decay the leaves that the plant collects. Birds Nest Ferns also grow happily in garden soil as long as it is kept moist ,shaded from the hot sun and preferably high humidity. Young plants will grow in suitable spots by themselves.

Birds Nest Ferns are suitable for pots and can be grown indoors or outdoors where they add a tropical feel to a garden. Allow a bit of space for this plant, as they grow quite large, having fronds up to 2 metres long. They are best suited to cool temperate, temperate and warmer climates and are common around Sydney gardens, where i took these photos.new7 022.jpgNew 6 077.jpgnew7 116.jpg

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@ctrl-alt-nwo, The Birds Nest Fern already in my home garden.

The bird’s nest fern plant gets its name from the fact that the center of the plant resembles a bird’s nest. It is also occasionally called a crow’s nest fern. Bird’s nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are identified by their flat, wavy or crinkly fronds. Their appearance can bring to mind a seaweed plant growing on dry land. Bird’s nest fern is an epiphytic fern, which means in the wild it typically grows on other things, like tree trunks or buildings. When you buy it as a houseplant, it will be planted in a container, but it can be affixed to planks and hung on a wall much like staghorn ferns.

Bird’s nest ferns grow best in medium to low indirect light. These ferns are often grown for their crinkly leaves and the light they receive will affect how crinkled the leaves are. A bird’s nest fern that receives more light, for example, will have more crinkled leaves, while one that receives less light will have flatter leaves. Keep in mind that too much light or direct light will cause the fronds on bird’s nest fern to yellow and die.

Source: https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/birds-nest-fern/birds-nest-fern-care.htm

Fav. comment Award ! Great Pics, thanks.

The Bird's nest differs from many in appearance because of it's spear like shaped leaves rather than feather or palm like fronds. The leaves (have a brown mid-rib and wavy margin) grow up to about 2ft long from a rosette of fronds where new leaves appear when the plant is producing new growth.

While a plant is young and small it can be placed anywhere in a home or office with the correct conditions provided (light, etc.). Once it matures though, you'll need to provide enough space for the rosette of fronds to spread out over 2ft each side. A conservatory is best suited or a fairly large room once it does mature.

https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/birds-nest-fern.html

Silly Sausage Award ! Thanks for your good choice of Pics.

The Bird's Nest Fern or Asplenium nidus is one of the several popular and beautiful ferns grown as houseplants. The Bird's Nest Fern is easy to care for and suits many homes making it a versatile houseplantFerns like this one can be grown in North facing windows perfectly well and will truly relish the type of light and cooler temperatures these places receive.

In return the Bird's Nest Fern will give you lots of naturally glossy leaves arranged in a circular pattern which resemble a bird's nest (hence the common name for these houseplants).

https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/bird-nest-fern

While this fern finds it home in the humid tropics, it can be found growing in and around trees. This may seem a little odd but there is a reason for this relationship. First, the tree provides additional humidity and two, it provides shade.

To successfully grow this fern indoor, we must first replicate the two conditions described above.

The first thing we need to consider is the light requirement of this plant. Light can be tricky when it comes to the Bird’s Nest Fern. The best type of sunlight for this plant is bright light without direct sunlight. If the plant receives too much sunlight, the fronds will become light green or will have burn marks. Having said that, there really nothing wrong with letting the plant have a little early morning or pre-sunset light.

http://www.weekendgardener.net/houseplant-care/how.to.care.for.and.grow.a.birds.nest.fern.htm

I love reading your posts as they giving me great ideas , i thinking when will be the best time to do it on my own as the winter is coming

Beautiful plant my friend and epiphytic, rosette-shaped fern with sword-like, undivided fronds growing from a central region. Fronds are smooth-textured, glossy, light green with a dark brown/black midrib, 60 to 120cms long and 7 to 20cms wide. In natural conditions this fern can be seen high up in crooks of trees but is generally planted at ground level, beneath a canopy of trees or tree ferns, preferring filtered light, to light shade. Grows well alongside Orchids and Bromeliads. Likes a loose, enriched, organic soil mix, kept as moist and humid as possible. Do not expose to direct sun, other than early morning sun and avoid frost prone zones and coastal exposure. In the growing season can be fertilised twice weekly with a liquid fertiliser but do not apply to centre of rosette.

SPECIFICATIONS

Dimensions Height: 0.6 to 1m, Width: 1.5m
Aspect Part shade
Origin Eastern Australia, tropical south east Asia
Pests & diseases Snails and slugs in garden situations and Mealy Bug on indoor plants.
Typical sizes 140mm, 200mm, 300mm

Thank you @ctrl-alt-nwo

A source of information: https://www.alpinenurseries.com.au/plant-library/asplenium-nidus/

Amazing plant @ctrl-alt-nwo! Commonly known as a bird’s nest fern, Asplenium nidus has many names. For instance, in Malaysia it is called: Rumah Langsuyar, in the Philippines: Pakpak-lauin and in China: Tai wan shan su hua. There are also many synonyms for this fern, which include Asplenium ficifolium, Asplenium antiquum, Neottopteris mauritiana, Neottopteris nidus. It belongs to the Plantae Kingdom , Pteridophyta phylum, Polypodiopsida class, Polypodiales order, the Aspleniaceae family, Asplenium genus.

Geographical distribution:

This fern is a native of tropical Africa , Australia and tropical Asia. Asplenium nidus either grow terrestrially on the ground, or epiphytically on the trees. Sometimes they grow on rocks (Piggott, 1988).

The sword-shaped fronds grow from the centre of the plant to form an inverted cone. The fronds are very long approximately 50-120cm, and 10-20cm wide, also the leaves or fronds are light green, often crinkled, with a smooth-edged blade and a black midrib that is obvious. The sporangia develop in clusters called sori, covered by an elongated indusium on the back of the fronds. It has roots for absorption of water and minerals from the soil (Koh, 2009). In terms of size this alters according to the habitat (Piggott, 1988).

A source: https://blogs.reading.ac.uk/tropical-biodiversity/2014/01/asplenium-nidus-2/

Aha! I have this fern in my garden, my friend gave it to me three years ago. Now they are quite big! I wish I could eat their leaves! So green and crunchy!

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Have seen them and yeah they do look pretty nice as well. While recently I was able to get few images and most of them were about different kind of leaves, well this kind of reminded me of those images .

It is a very beautiful plant @ctrl-alt-nwo and makes a nice decoration to trees too. It thrives in a wet environment.

A great plant, when I saw that it was in a tree, I understood why it got its name. it is very similar to a bird's nest.

Великолепное растение, когда я увидел, что она находитбся на дереве я понял, почему оно получило такое название. оно очень похоже на птичье гнездо.

Luxurious ferns stand out not only the status of an ancient plant. These garden stars do not know the leaves of equal beauty, lacy and fascinating, by the ability to instantly change the atmosphere in the ensemble and create strange shady thickets.
One of the distinguishing features of ferns has always been a clean, saturated color of greenery, but in color, these plants are not so simple as they seem at first glance. Indeed, among the ferns there are spectacular unusual species that can surprise with unusual textures and unusual shades of the palette, the original form. However, with all their glamor, these plants never lose their legendary mystery. This is an amazing racialism. Thank you for sharing information about this.

https://www.botanichka.ru/article/paporotniki/

Asplenium nidus is an epiphytic species of fern in the family Aspleniaceae, native to tropical southeastern Asia, eastern Australia, Hawaii, Polynesia, Christmas Island, India, and eastern Africa. It is known by the common names bird's-nest fern (a name shared by other aspleniums) or simply nest fern.
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A 2015 molecular study found that Asplenium nidus is polyphyletic, meaning that some populations were not closely related to others—A. nidus from Madagascar, Vanuatu and New Guinea were more closely related to other species than each other. Hence a revision with sampling of the species across its range was required to delineate the taxon and identify cryptic species.
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It looks like that you have tracked those accounts where only made transaction based on who comments in sir @ctrl-alt-nwo post. But transaction not means multi accounts. I have a relation with my several friends in facebook group where I sell my steem or sbd. Some of them also follow me and i think some of them also made comment on sir @ctrl-alt-nwo post. That not means I'm a multi user. And I'm not a mad that I use 11 accounts as you recommend, it's totally foolish idea.

Indeed, i saw this kind of plants and birds are always love to made their nest every branch of this plants..

interesting knowing about it for the first time thanks for sharing this post the comments really help a lot too :)

@ctrl-alt-nwo, Birds Nest Fern is really awesome in my opinion and in my observation it's reflecting as this plant is reflecting as plants with the Multi Hands which are spreading to hug the essence of nature. And i strongly believe that these kind of plants can make our environment more beautiful and more pleasant and these plants also hold the creative essence. And i also believe and in my opinion the creator is a Artist and these natural beauties are live art pieces.

Wishing you an great day and stay blessed. 🙂

Yes, I can find it in my area and this type of plant often grows attached to a large tree. this plant also has black fibers or feathers the size of a stick.

Ferns that belong to the asplenium genus, one of which is glimpsed by lovers of ornamental plants. The form of ferns from this genus has similarities to bird nests. Because of its resemblance, ornamental plant lovers call it a bird's nest nail. Bird nest nails multiply with spores. These spores are located at the bottom of the leaf and are brown. Life of asplenium is epiphytic. This means that in his life only attached to the host plant. Bird nest nails take nutrients from organic materials that rot and stick to the host plant.
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The type of asplenium that is often maintained by the community is Asplenium nidus. But fanatic plant lovers are not satisfied with this type. Currently breeders are developing unique and rare bird nest nails. With the mutation treatment, the chicks that occur can produce variegata and cristata types. Cross breeds can produce new hybrids. The results of the mutation treatment are temporary. If people are not good at maintaining this bird's nest, it's easy to change. Plants that occur from mutations tend to return to their original nature. The results of crosses are permanent. This hybrid is expected by fans of ferns.
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Asplenium treatment is easy. This plant needs a moist, wet and shaded place. In asplenium treatment should avoid direct exposure to sunlight. Leaves exposed to direct sunlight will be seen burning. The leaves will be yellow until finally brown and die. Providing organic matter is needed to add nutrients. Organic ingredients such as leaf litter, coconut fiber and straw can be used by hobbyists in asplenium treatment.

Source:
https://www.google.co.id/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://biodiversitywarriors.org/m/isi-katalog.php%3Fidk%3D5920&ved=2ahUKEwjcrL3-6YXeAhULK48KHfZdC4oQFjAXegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw0g8UBv1wy07eTbQt2PrwwM

The name and the plant are great. I never saw this plant, I know just the real Bird Nest. The last picture ist wonderful!

How it looks: Ferns are quite an interesting group of plants to grow indoors because of the various types of fronds they display, so you could have three ferns in one room from the same class and genera that look kind of unrelated.


The Bird's nest differs from many in appearance because of it's spear like shaped leaves rather than feather or palm like fronds. The leaves (have a brown mid-rib and wavy margin) grow up to about 2ft long from a rosette of fronds where new leaves appear when the plant is producing new growth.

Displaying: While a plant is young and small it can be placed anywhere in a home or office with the correct conditions provided (light, etc.). Once it matures though, you'll need to provide enough space for the rosette of fronds to spread out over 2ft each side. A conservatory is best suited or a fairly large room once it does mature.

Care level: The two main conditions to provide well is enough humidity and to protect the leaves from direct sunlight (they become scorched), although some sunlight is ideal for them. If a person has sufficient living space and can follow the straight forward care instructions below, anyone can grow and maintain them.

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Wow so very beautiful garden, thanks for sharing.really nice for lovely Birds Nest Fern tress.....
Resteem

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Bird's Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus) is a relatively carefree plant with an upright, clumping form and large fronds.

Light: Bird's Nest Fern grows best in filtered or indirect light. An east- or north-facing window is ideal.

Watering: Water your plant as necessary to keep the potting mix evenly moist but not soggy. These plants also benefit from moderate humidity when grown indoors. The best way to increase the humidity around your plants is to run a humidifier nearby. You can also set plants in trays filled with pebbles or gravel. Add water to a level just below the tops of the pebbles (if the potting mix in the pots comes in contact with the water, the mix will draw water into the pot, which will cause the mix to become saturated, eventually leading to rot). Refill trays frequently to replace water lost through evaporation. (Our Humiditrays perform the same function without the need for pebbles.)

Temperature: Bird's Nest Fern prefers to be kept at regular room temperature, with nighttime temperatures above 60°F.

Fertilizer: During the growing season (generally April into September) fertilize potted plants once a month using a houseplant formula mixed at 1/2 strength. Withhold fertilizer in fall and winter, when most plants rest.

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Our planet is 300% spherical)) Different continents, different in their current type of plant, and their preferences and methods of reproduction are the same. Víscum - family Santalaceae lives in our area. This plant has a very sticky juice. The seeds are glued to the paws of birds and spread to other trees. I have long been writing about this plant article. It was interesting to read your article. Wonderful representative of the world of plants.

beautiful! (btw, just put up the "super" bullish scenario for silver and how the "ratio" favors the "white metal"..thank you..

The times have passed when ferns reigned on the planet, the species struck them with a variety of leaf shapes and inhabited all the spaces of the planet, and now they form thickets mostly in damp and warm countries. For the modern gardener, original plants are of decorative value and can perfectly decorate the interior. I found some photos with different types of fern. I think you will like it. Thank you

https://womanadvice.ru/paporotniki-vidy-i-osobennosti-vyrashchivaniya

Bird’s Nest Fern Care – How To Grow Bird’s Nest Fern

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When most people think of ferns, they think of feathery, airy fronds, but not all ferns actually look like this. The bird’s nest fern is an example of a fern that defies our preconceived ideas of what a fern should look like. Even better is the fact that a bird’s nest fern plant makes an excellent low light houseplant.

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About the Bird’s Nest Fern Plant
The bird’s nest fern plant gets its name from the fact that the center of the plant resembles a bird’s nest. It is also occasionally called a crow’s nest fern. Bird’s nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are identified by their flat, wavy or crinkly fronds. Their appearance can bring to mind a seaweed plant growing on dry land.

Bird’s nest fern is an epiphytic fern, which means in the wild it typically grows on other things, like tree trunks or buildings. When you buy it as a houseplant, it will be planted in a container, but it can be affixed to planks and hung on a wall much like staghorn ferns.

tree-fern-copy-2.jpg

How to Grow Bird’s Nest Fern
Bird’s nest ferns grow best in medium to low indirect light. These ferns are often grown for their crinkly leaves and the light they receive will affect how crinkled the leaves are. A bird’s nest fern that receives more light, for example, will have more crinkled leaves, while one that receives less light will have flatter leaves. Keep in mind that too much light or direct light will cause the fronds on bird’s nest fern to yellow and die.

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Care for a Bird’s Nest Fern In addition to light, another important aspect of bird’s nest fern care is its watering. Under ideal circumstances, all ferns would like to have consistently moist, but not wet, soil. However, part of the reason that bird’s nest fern makes an ideal houseplant is that it will tolerate soil that dries out from time to time. Furthermore, this plant does not require the same level of humidity that many other kinds of ferns need, making the care for a bird’s nest fern far more forgiving to the occasionally forgetful houseplant owner than other ferns.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/birds-nest-fern/birds-nest-fern-care.htm

Bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are actually one of two Asplenium species found in cultivation. The other, often called the spleenwort or mother fern (Asplenium bulbiferum), is much harder to grow and looks nothing like its cousin. These ferns are naturally epiphytic, and in their rainforest homes, they can be found growing high in the crooks of trees.plants_hero_birdsnest.jpg
They grow in a series of erect, spoon-shaped, and apple-colored fronds that rise from a central rosette. Healthy plants can have fronds up to three feet, but this is rare in most indoor situations.These are beautiful plants but require a bit of babying to reach their fullest potential.BirdsNest1.jpg
If you follow the correct growing conditions for your bird's nest fern, it will likely live for many years and always look its best.Light: Filtered light to light shade. Don't expose to direct sun other than very early morning sun.xbird-nest-fern-in-forest.jpg.pagespeed.ic.0gA9c8u-Y2.jpgWater: These are true jungle plants—keep their compost moist and provide the highest humidity possible.Temperature: Bird's nest ferns will begin to suffer below about 55 F for prolonged periods. They are best kept between 70 F and 80 F, with high humidity. A warming pad will often help dormant plants.bird-nest-fern-plant-500x500.jpg
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The Bird's Nest Fern or Asplenium nidus is one of the several popular and beautiful ferns grown as houseplants.
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Ferns like this one can be grown in North facing windows perfectly well and will truly relish the type of light and cooler temperatures these places receive.
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Botanical Name: Asplenium nidus

Bird Nest Fern is one of the easiest types of ferns to grow. This tropical native is fast-growing and will live for many years with good care.

In its natural habitat, it grows as an epiphyte (a plant that grows on trees) in the warm, moist, tropical rain forests. Despite its tropical beginnings, it adapts well to being a house plant. Place your potted fern where it is out of direct sun and away from drafts, which can scorch the fronds. Provide humidity and you'll keep it healthy.

This unique fern grows in the form of a deep rosette of large, shiny, spear-shaped fronds. New fronds unfurl from the center of the plant. Its fronds are fragile, so I'd put this fern where passersby won't brush up against it.

As Bird Nest Fern ages, the oldest, outer fronds will turn brown. This is normal. You can cut them off at the base to keep the plant looking neat.

Those upright fronds tend to be dust-catchers. Keep the broad, shiny fronds dust-free by spraying with water and gently wiping them with a damp cloth. Never use leafshine products on ferns because it can severely damage their delicate fronds.

Repot young plants in spring, every couple years or when the roots fill the pot. If you find that the roots are attached to the pot, run a knife around the inside to loosen them before you can remove the rootball. You may need to break the pot to remove it. It's a good idea to use a container with drainage holes to avoid soggy soil. Take care not to pack down the potting mix; this fern likes a loose mixture.

This fern's problems are few. Watch for scale insects, that look like small, brown discs on fronds. If you find an invasion of these pests, spray with soapy water followed by clean water. Don't use insecticides on ferns because they are easily damaged by chemicals.

http://www.guide-to-houseplants.com/birds-nest-fern.html

The Asplenium nidus is an epiphytic species known as the Bird's nest fern that roots itself to trees in it's natural habitat and warmer climates.From the range of ferns that can be grown indoors this plant has larger leaflets than most and gives that large full leaf foliage plant appearance.

Now I spend most of my time in Thailand I get to find all sorts of great indoor plants growing in the wild and within gardens. This A.nidus is growing in my neighbors garden attached to the tree in the picture (right of page).

Although a native to tropical regions - the A.nidus that roots itself on trees has adapted very well to growing in temperate regions as a house plant.

Two reasons it grows well under and attached to trees is because it receives the moisture (humidity) it requires and shade by taking cover from direct sunlight. Indoors we must also provide these humidity levels and provide enough light without direct sunlight to enable the plant to grow well and remain healthy.

How it looks: Ferns are quite an interesting group of plants to grow indoors because of the various types of fronds they display, so you could have three ferns in one room from the same class and genera that look kind of unrelated.

The Bird's nest differs from many in appearance because of it's spear like shaped leaves rather than feather or palm like fronds. The leaves (have a brown mid-rib and wavy margin) grow up to about 2ft long from a rosette of fronds where new leaves appear when the plant is producing new growth.

Displaying: While a plant is young and small it can be placed anywhere in a home or office with the correct conditions provided (light, etc.). Once it matures though, you'll need to provide enough space for the rosette of fronds to spread out over 2ft each side. A conservatory is best suited or a fairly large room once it does mature.

Care level: The two main conditions to provide well is enough humidity and to protect the leaves from direct sunlight (they become scorched), although some sunlight is ideal for them. If a person has sufficient living space and can follow the straight forward care instructions below, anyone can grow and maintain them.
https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/birds-nest-fern.html

Features: The frond is fresh green, a broad and very long ribbon (50-150cm) with slightly wavy edges and a black central rib. The spores appear on the underside in fine lines. The fronds emerge in a rosette around a central stem which is usually not visible. Dead leaves collect in this 'nest' of fronds and are held firmly in place as new fronds emerge. Roots from the central stem grow into the dead leaves, further consolidating the decaying leaves into a huge spongy mass. This mass soaks up rainwater, while the ongoing decay releases nutrients. Thus the fern is self-sufficient in food and water even though it lives high up from the ground. As the older fronds die, they droop downwards forming a skirt of dry fronds under the younger, green fronds.

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This is a far out fern with a far out name! I first saw this Crested Japanese Bird’s Nest Fern, whose botanic name is Asplenium antiquum “Leslie”, at our farmers market and had to have it. I love those wild, wavy edges and the crispy noise it makes when touched. I must say, this plant reminds me of an unusual green that I’d put in my salad.

https://www.joyusgarden.com/wp-
content/uploads/2015/02/P1040897_new.jpg

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Variant names
Malay: Daun semun, paku langsuyar, paku padan, rumah langsuyar, selimbar.
Chinese: Niaochao jue.

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The bird’s-nest fern (Asplenium nidus) is a large, leafy fern commonly found on wayside trees in Singapore, particularly the rain tree. The fern, which grows at the base of large branches, has a unique ability to trap water and develop its own store of humus.

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Description
The bird’s-nest fern is an epiphyte plant that can be found in Asia, Australia, and Africa. It has a stout erect rhizome (stem) that bears a rosette of simple leaves (fronds) to form a “nest”. The stem is usually not visible from the top. Beneath the nest of fronds is a large, spongy mass of roots. The nest traps fallen leaves and other debris, which eventually decompose to become humus. When it rains, large quantities of water are absorbed by the sponge of roots. In this way, the plant is self-sufficient in acquiring its food and water, so much so that it provides a habitat for the growth of other ferns and mosses, and even home for small animals.

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Usage and potential

Food: The bird’s-nest fern is non-poisonous and occasionally eaten by aboriginal tribes in Malaysia.

Medicine: There are several medicinal uses of the bird’s-nest fern by the Malaysian native tribes. Infusion of the fronds is used to ease labour pains. The leaves can also be pounded in water and used as a lotion to treat fever. Two young fronds can be eaten when they are still coiled as a contraceptive, and tea made from fronds can be used for general weakness.
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In my country colombia you can find a lot of this plants

Based in you post i learned a lot more about them. Regards

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Hi @magoo-2 are you stupid? @martha75 is my mom please search more and more before repeat and repeat the same wrong thing.

Green plants are always good for planting . Green color gives beautiful look to place . Also good for climate . Thanks for blog

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Ferns in the genus Asplenium are referred to as spleenworts—asplenium is the Greek word for spleen, and wort is a general word for plant. At one time, people thought ingesting these ferns medicinally would cure disorders of the spleen.

SIDE DISH
The newly emerging, curled fronds (called crosiers) of Asplenium australasicum are a popular vegetable in Taiwan.

UNIQUE ADDITION
Asplenium goudeyi is only found on Lord Howe Island off the coast of Australia, and it was only recently described for science, in 1996.

IN CELEBRATION
In old Hawaii, the leaves of Asplenium nidus, called ekaha, adorned hula altars and were used in canoe tree-cutting ceremonies.

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Sometimes plants provide a much-needed escape—not just by working with them, but also in their appearance in general. Take the bird’s nest fern: One look at this popular houseplant—with its long, waxy, apple-green fronds—sends us daydreaming to a tropical paradise.

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Nice plant. Green color is giving refreshness to eyes. This would be good plant for humans, birds and nature . Thanks

Asplenium Nidus (Bird's Nest Fern)

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About the Bird's Nest Fern
The Bird's Nest Fern or Asplenium nidus is one of the several popular and beautiful ferns grown as houseplants.

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Ferns like this one can be grown in North facing windows perfectly well and will truly relish the type of light and cooler temperatures these places receive.

In return the Bird's Nest Fern will give you lots of naturally glossy leaves arranged in a circular pattern which resemble a bird's nest (hence the common name for these houseplants).

bird_nest_fern.jpg

These Ferns have very few problems, are cheap to purchase and readily available. They're particularly good indoor plants for bathrooms or a frequently used kitchen because these places tend to have a steamy atmosphere.

This is important because a Bird Nest Fern needs some humidity to really thrive indoors, they'll still cope and deal with an average room but for that extra shine and extra large size you'll need to be misting regularly.

Alternatively, if you don't have the time for all that misting, the Bird Nest Fern is an ideal plant to keep in a home terrarium or glass bottle garden, these enclosed spaces create naturally moist and protective environments that many types of plants, including most ferns, will do well in.

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https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/bird-nest-fern

Growing Bird's Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus)

Bird's Nest Fern (Asplenium nidus) is a relatively carefree plant with an upright, clumping form and large fronds.

Light: Bird's Nest Fern grows best in filtered or indirect light. An east- or north-facing window is ideal.

Watering: Water your plant as necessary to keep the potting mix evenly moist but not soggy. These plants also benefit from moderate humidity when grown indoors. The best way to increase the humidity around your plants is to run a humidifier nearby. You can also set plants in trays filled with pebbles or gravel. Add water to a level just below the tops of the pebbles (if the potting mix in the pots comes in contact with the water, the mix will draw water into the pot, which will cause the mix to become saturated, eventually leading to rot). Refill trays frequently to replace water lost through evaporation. (Our Humiditrays perform the same function without the need for pebbles.)

Temperature: Bird's Nest Fern prefers to be kept at regular room temperature, with nighttime temperatures above 60°F.

Fertilizer: During the growing season (generally April into September) fertilize potted plants once a month using a houseplant formula mixed at 1/2 strength. Withhold fertilizer in fall and winter, when most plants rest.

https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/how-to-grow-birds-nest-fern

The Bird's Nest Fern or Asplenium nidus is one of the several popular and beautiful ferns grown as houseplants. The Bird's Nest Fern is easy to care for and suits many homes making it a versatile houseplantFerns like this one can be grown in North facing windows perfectly well and will truly relish the type of light and cooler temperatures these places receive.

In return the Bird's Nest Fern will give you lots of naturally glossy leaves arranged in a circular pattern which resemble a bird's nest (hence the common name for these houseplants).

These Ferns have very few problems, are cheap to purchase and readily available. They're particularly good indoor plants for bathrooms or a frequently used kitchen because these places tend to have a steamy atmosphere.

This is important because a Bird Nest Fern needs some humidity to really thrive indoors, they'll still cope and deal with an average room but for that extra shine and extra large size you'll need to be misting regularly.

Alternatively, if you don't have the time for all that misting, the Bird Nest Fern is an ideal plant to keep in a home terrarium or glass bottle garden, these enclosed spaces create naturally moist and protective environments that many types of plants, including most ferns, will do well in.

The older glass bottle garden are a little old fashioned we'd admit, but as design pieces themselves they have started to become more popular again with interior designers. You may have a larger selection to pick from at car boot sales or in antique shops, but Amazon have a few of the more modern fashion trends to give you some inspiration. Take a look at the links below.

https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/bird-nest-fern

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The Asplenium nidus is an epiphytic species known as the Bird's nest fern that roots itself to trees in it's natural habitat and warmer climates.
asplenium_nidus.jpg

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From the range of ferns that can be grown indoors this plant has larger leaflets than most and gives that large full leaf foliage plant appearance.
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very very beautiful photography. I like this photos

So cool photography and nature trees .great information.

The Bird's Nest Fern or Asplenium nidus is one of the several popular and beautiful ferns grown as houseplants. The Bird's Nest Fern is easy to care for and suits many homes making it a versatile houseplantFerns like this one can be grown in North facing windows perfectly well and will truly relish the type of light and cooler temperatures these places receive.


In return the Bird's Nest Fern will give you lots of naturally glossy leaves arranged in a circular pattern which resemble a bird's nest (hence the common name for these houseplants).


These Ferns have very few problems, are cheap to purchase and readily available. They're particularly good indoor plants for bathrooms or a frequently used kitchen because these places tend to have a steamy atmosphere.

This is important because a Bird Nest Fern needs some humidity to really thrive indoors, they'll still cope and deal with an average room but for that extra shine and extra large size you'll need to be misting regularly.

source

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Asplenium nidus
Bird's-nest fern is a common name applied to several related species of epiphytic ferns in the genus Asplenium. They grow in a tight, nest-like clump with a lingulate leaf rosette and are usually epiphytic, growing in trees.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71TbtTJYYtL.SX425.jpg

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Bird's-nest fern

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Asplenium-nidus-Cristatum.jpg

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Bird's-nest fern is a common name applied to several related species of epiphytic ferns in the genus Asplenium. They grow in a tight, nest-like clump with a lingulate leaf rosette and are usually epiphytic, growing in trees.

Species known as bird's nest fern include:

A. nidus (bird's-nest fern)
A. australasicum (crow's-nest fern)
A. antiquum
A. serratum (wild bird's-nest fern)
This page is an index of articles on plant species (or higher taxonomic groups) with the same common name (vernacular name). If an internal link led you here, you may wish to edit the linking article so that it links directly to the intended article.

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https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird%27s-nest_fern

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Wow really amazing photography. good article and hard writing
For your post propagation.
Upvote/Resteem

Lovely plant my companion and epiphytic, rosette-formed greenery with sword-like, unified fronds developing from a focal locale. Fronds are smooth-finished, gleaming, light green with a dull dark colored/dark midrib, 60 to 120cms long and 7 to 20cms wide. In regular conditions this plant can be seen high up in criminals of trees yet is for the most part planted at ground level, underneath a shelter of trees or tree greeneries, inclining toward sifted light, to light shade. Develops well nearby Orchids and Bromeliads. Preferences a free, enhanced, natural soil blend, kept as sodden and muggy as would be prudent. Try not to open to coordinate sun, other than early morning sun and dodge ice inclined zones and seaside presentation. In the developing season can be prepared twice week by week with a fluid manure yet don't make a difference to focal point of rosette.

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Did not know you could grow those in trees.. very cool

Good green plant . This plant would be full of iron . Becoz green plants are good source of iron and other necessary vitamins minerals . Good blog.

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Asplenium australasicum - bird's nest fern

A favorite among Australian gardeners, ideal in hanging baskets, containers and set within tree branches for a cascading effect.

The bird’s-nest fern (Asplenium nidus) is a large, leafy fern commonly found on wayside trees in Singapore, particularly the rain tree.1 The fern, which grows at the base of large branches, has a unique ability to trap water and develop its own store of humus.


Description
The bird’s-nest fern is an epiphyte plant that can be found in Asia, Australia, and Africa.2 It has a stout erect rhizome (stem) that bears a rosette of simple leaves (fronds) to form a “nest”. The stem is usually not visible from the top. Beneath the nest of fronds is a large, spongy mass of roots.

The nest traps fallen leaves and other debris, which eventually decompose to become humus. When it rains, large quantities of water are absorbed by the sponge of roots.3 In this way, the plant is self-sufficient in acquiring its food and water, so much so that it provides a habitat for the growth of other ferns and mosses, and even home for small animals.4


The fronds can grow to a length of more than a metre and a width of about 20 cm, with the whole plant extending about two metres across.5 The leaves are in a shiny light-green colour, with a smooth, sometimes wavy-edged, blade as well as a prominent black midrib. The sporangia – sacs that produce spores for reproduction – are found on the underside of the fronds in parallel rows inclined at 45 deg to the midrib. The fern produces plentiful spores that are dispersed by wind.

In some Malay rural areas, the plant is believed to have supernatural properties, or the home of the langsuir, a mythical female banshee hostile to pregnant women.

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When most people think of ferns, they think of feathery, airy fronds, but not all ferns actually look like this. The bird’s nest fern is an example of a fern that defies our preconceived ideas of what a fern should look like. Even better is the fact that a bird’s nest fern plant makes an excellent low light houseplant. About the Bird’s Nest Fern Plant The bird’s nest fern plant gets its name from the fact that the center of the plant resembles a bird’s nest. It is also occasionally called a crow’s nest fern. Bird’s nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are identified by their flat, wavy or crinkly fronds. Their appearance can bring to mind a seaweed plant growing on dry land. Bird’s nest fern is an epiphytic fern, which means in the wild it typically grows on other things, like tree trunks or buildings. When you buy it as a houseplant, it will be planted in a container, but it can be affixed to planks and hung on a wall much like staghorn ferns. How to Grow Bird’s Nest Fern Bird’s nest ferns grow best in medium to low indirect light. These ferns are often grown for their crinkly leaves and the light they receive will affect how crinkled the leaves are. A bird’s nest fern that receives more light, for example, will have more crinkled leaves, while one that receives less light will have flatter leaves. Keep in mind that too much light or direct light will cause the fronds on bird’s nest fern to yellow and die. Care for a Bird’s Nest Fern In addition to light, another important aspect of bird’s nest fern care is its watering. Under ideal circumstances, all ferns would like to have consistently moist, but not wet, soil. However, part of the reason that bird’s nest fern makes an ideal houseplant is that it will tolerate soil that dries out from time to time. Furthermore, this plant does not require the same level of humidity that many other kinds of ferns need, making the care for a bird’s nest fern far more forgiving to the occasionally forgetful houseplant owner than other ferns. Fertilizer should only be given to the plant two to three times a year. Even then, the fertilizer should only be applied at half strength and should only be given during the spring and summer months. Too much fertilizer will cause deformed leaves with brown or yellow spots or edges. Now that you know more about how to grow bird’s nest fern and how easy these plants are to grow, try giving them a place in your home. They make a wonderful and green addition to the less brightly lit rooms in your home.
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https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/birds-nest-fern/birds-nest-fern-care.htm

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LIGHT REQUIREMENTS
Your Bird’s Nest Fern will do best in medium to low light. The more light it receives, the more the leaves will crinkle and the less light, the flatter the leaves will be. Keep in mind, too much light or direct sunlight will cause the fronds on the fern to yellow and die.

WATER REQUIREMENTS
Under ideal circumstances, all ferns would like to have constantly moist, but not wet soil. However, the Bird’s Nest Fern will tolerate soil that dries out from time to time.

HUMIDITY PREFERENCE
This plant does not require the same level of humidity that many other kinds of ferns need.

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Birds Nest Fern
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Asplenium nidus is an epiphytic species of fern in the family Aspleniaceae, native to tropical southeastern Asia, eastern Australia, Hawaii, Polynesia, Christmas Island, India, and eastern Africa. It is known by the common names bird's-nest fern or simply nest fern.

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Kingdom: Plantae
Scientific name: Asplenium nidus
Did you know: Asplenium nidus can survive either as an epiphytal, or terrestrial plant, but typically grows on organic matter.

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How to Grow Bird's Nest Ferns

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Bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are actually one of two Asplenium species found in cultivation. The other, often called the spleenwort or mother fern (Asplenium bulbiferum), is much harder to grow and looks nothing like its cousin. These ferns are naturally epiphytic, and in their rainforest homes, they can be found growing high in the crooks of trees. They grow in a series of erect, spoon-shaped, and apple-colored fronds that rise from a central rosette. Healthy plants can have fronds up to three feet, but this is rare in most indoor situations.

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Growing Conditions
If you follow the correct growing conditions for your bird's nest fern, it will likely live for many years and always look its best.

Light: Filtered light to light shade. Don't expose to direct sun other than very early morning sun.
Water: These are true jungle plants—keep their compost moist and provide the highest humidity possible.
Temperature: Bird's nest ferns will begin to suffer below about 55 F for prolonged periods. They are best kept between 70 F and 80 F, with high humidity. A warming pad will often help dormant plants.
Soil: Loose, rich organic compost.
Fertilizer: During growing season, fertilizer weekly or biweekly with weak liquid fertilizer. Don't put fertilizer pellets in the central cup.

tree-fern-copy-2.jpgimages (1).jpeg

https://www.thespruce.com/grow-asplenium-nidus-ferns-1902716

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Common Name: Bird's-Nest Fern, Bird's-Nest-Plant, Spleenwort

Botanical Name: Asplenium nidus, as-PLEEN-ee-um NI-dus

Decorative Life: Years.

Availability: Year Round

Harvest Instructions:
Although this species can grow under very acid soil conditions, the best pH range is 5.0-5.5. High light levels induce wavier or crinkle looking fronds while low light levels result in smoother ones. Tipburn is often caused by excessive fertilization.

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Bird Nest Fern
Botanical Name: Asplenium nidus

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Bird Nest Fern is one of the easiest types of ferns to grow. This tropical native is fast-growing and will live for many years with good care.

In its natural habitat, it grows as an epiphyte (a plant that grows on trees) in the warm, moist, tropical rain forests. Despite its tropical beginnings, it adapts well to being a house plant. Place your potted fern where it is out of direct sun and away from drafts, which can scorch the fronds. Provide humidity and you'll keep it healthy.

Birds-Nest-Fern-Crispy-Wave-LPOBIRNCW.jpg

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This unique fern grows in the form of a deep rosette of large, shiny, spear-shaped fronds. New fronds unfurl from the center of the plant. Its fronds are fragile, so I'd put this fern where passersby won't brush up against it.

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As Bird Nest Fern ages, the oldest, outer fronds will turn brown. This is normal. You can cut them off at the base to keep the plant looking neat.

Those upright fronds tend to be dust-catchers. Keep the broad, shiny fronds dust-free by spraying with water and gently wiping them with a damp cloth. Never use leafshine products on ferns because it can severely damage their delicate fronds.

Repot young plants in spring, every couple years or when the roots fill the pot. If you find that the roots are attached to the pot, run a knife around the inside to loosen them before you can remove the rootball. You may need to break the pot to remove it. It's a good idea to use a container with drainage holes to avoid soggy soil. Take care not to pack down the potting mix; this fern likes a loose mixture.

http://www.guide-to-houseplants.com/birds-nest-fern.html

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Birds Nest Fern

Birds-Nest-Fern-Crispy-Wave-LPOBIRNCW.jpg

Types of Birds Nest Fern
Asplenium antiquum, 'Bird's-Nest Fern', 'ō-tani-watari', 'Tani-watari' Save. ...
Asplenium australasicum, 'Bird's Nest Fern', 'Crow's Nest Fern' Save. ...
Asplenium nidus, 'Bird's-nest Fern', 'Nest Fern' Save. ...
Asplenium serratum, 'Bird's Nest Spleenwort', 'Wild Birdsnest Fern', 'New World Birdsnest Fern'

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The Bird’s Nest fern is native to the rain forests of Asia, Africa, and Australia which explains why high humidity is essential for it to thrive. This fern has long, erect, leathery, apple-green fronds that never split like those of a Kimberly Queen fern or a Maidenhair fern. The wide rippled leaves of a Bird’s Nest fern emerge from a central rosette or crown that looks like a fuzzy brown funnel. When the new fronds first emerge, they resemble little bird eggs which is why we call it a Bird’s Nest fern. It’s important to never get water on the crown or it will develop plant diseases. The tongue shaped fronds of a Bird’s Nest fern are fragile so put it where it can’t be bumped. The unique attractive Bird’s Nest fern requires quite a bit of care and is not a good plant for beginners.

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Bird's nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are actually one of two Asplenium species found in cultivation. The other, often called the spleenwort or mother fern (Asplenium bulbiferum), is much harder to grow and looks nothing like its cousin.

These ferns are naturally epiphytic, and in their rainforest homes, they can be found growing high in the crooks of trees. They grow in a series of erect, spoon-shaped, and apple-colored fronds that rise from a central rosette.

Healthy plants can have fronds up to three feet, but this is rare in most indoor situations. These are beautiful plants but require a bit of babying to reach their fullest potential.

Source

Birds Nest Fern: How To Grow And Care For Asplenium Species

Common Name(s) Birds nest fern, Bird’s nest fern, Bird’s-nest fern, ō-tani-watari, tani-watari, Crow’s nest fern, Nest fern, Bird’s nest spleenwort, Wild birdsnest fern, New World birdsnest fern
Scientific Name Asplenium antiquum, Asplenium australasicum, Asplenium nidus, Asplenium serratum
Family Aspleniaceae
Origin Tropical areas throughout Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Australia, and the United States

Height 2-3 feet at maximum growth
Light Shade to indirect low light
Water Moist but not wet soil, water around base of plant
Temperature 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit is ideal for this tropical plant.
Humidity Loves high humidity.
Soil Extremely well-draining potting mix
Fertilizer Balanced liquid fertilizer, diluted to half or less strength
Propagation Spores or tissue culture
Pests Foliar nematodes, caterpillars, fungus gnats, mealybugs, scale, slugs. Also can experience bacterial blight.

https://www.epicgardening.com/birds-nest-fern/

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Bird's-nest fern
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Asplenium nidus
Bird's-nest fern is a common name applied to several related species of epiphytic ferns in the genus Asplenium. They grow in a tight, nest-like clump with a lingulate leaf rosette and are usually epiphytic, growing in trees.


Species known as bird's nest fern include:

A. nidus (bird's-nest fern)
A. australasicum (crow's-nest fern)
A. antiquum
A. serratum (wild bird's-nest fern)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bird%27s-nest_fern

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Birds Nest Fern

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How do you care for a bird nest fern?

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To care for Asplenium nidus houseplants, place in an area of the home with indirect or shady light. Asplenium nidus prefer evenly moist surroundings. Watering the soil often during growth and housing the plant in a moderately humid area will help to maintain a healthy environment during care for Bird's Nest Fern.

images.jpeg

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Bird Nest Fern Care Tips

Origin: Southeast Asia and Tropical Australia

Height: 2 ft (60 cm) in a container indoors

Light: Moderate to bright light. No direct sun, which can scorch the fronds. Give the pot a quarter turn each week for even growth.

Water: Keep soil evenly moist. Water the potting mix, not the center of the rosette, otherwise it can easily rot. Water less in winter. Yellow fronds are often a sign of overwatering.

Humidity: Moderate. If the relative humidity drops below 50%, use a humidity tray or room humidifier to add moisture to the air around the fern. Brown leaf tips are a sign of dry air.

Temperature: Slightly cool to average room temps (60-75°F/16-24°C) suit this tropical fern just fine.

Soil: Peat moss based, such as African violet potting mix.

Fertilizer: Feed every 2 weeks in spring and summer with a balanced liquid fertilizer diluted by half.

Propagation: This fern is propagated by spores, which is difficult to do for the home grower.

http://www.guide-to-houseplants.com/birds-nest-fern.html

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Is The Bird's Nest Fern Poisonous?
No, this fern isn't toxic to people, cats or dogs.

Anything else?
Ferns in general are quite sensitive to chemicals so you must avoid leaf shine products to prevent issues. The leaves are naturally glossy anyway, but of course if they start to dull from dust you can just pop the plant under a warm shower for a minute to wash the grime away.


Bird Nest Fern Problems
Why are there are dark brown spots on the fronds / leaves?

In most cases these spots are actually spores, which are basically seeds. It's perfectly normal and indicates you've a mature and healthy plant, just leave them as they are.

Make sure however the brown spots aren't Scale Insects which can look awfully similar. Spores will be regularly spaced and only appear on older Bird Nest Ferns, whereas Scale will have a random pattern and can afflict a plant at any age. If you do have a Scale Insect problem get rid of them quickly to prevent them from spreading to other houseplants. The link above will help you get to grips with doing this.

Why are there brown tips on the leaves on my bird's nest fern?

In most cases this is a result of dry air, or allowing the soil to dry out too much before re watering. On occasion it can also be an indication you're overwatering. Remember that the soil should be moist for much of the time, not really dry or really wet.

Why are the leaves on my bird's nest fern turning yellow?

If the yellowing starts at the ends of the fronds this is probably normal aging. If the yellow is starting from the base of the fronds then the temperature is likely on the high side, find a cooler place in your home for it to live. Other causes could be from using hard cold water, exposure to draughts, or chemicals.

https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/bird-nest-fern

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When most people think of ferns, they think of feathery, airy fronds, but not all ferns actually look like this. The bird’s nest fern is an example of a fern that defies our preconceived ideas of what a fern should look like. Even better is the fact that a bird’s nest fern plant makes an excellent low light houseplant. About the Bird’s Nest Fern Plant The bird’s nest fern plant gets its name from the fact that the center of the plant resembles a bird’s nest. It is also occasionally called a crow’s nest fern. Bird’s nest ferns (Asplenium nidus) are identified by their flat, wavy or crinkly fronds. Their appearance can bring to mind a seaweed plant growing on dry land. Bird’s nest fern is an epiphytic fern, which means in the wild it typically grows on other things, like tree trunks or buildings. When you buy it as a houseplant, it will be planted in a container, but it can be affixed to planks and hung on a wall much like staghorn ferns.

How to Grow Bird’s Nest Fern Bird’s nest ferns grow best in medium to low indirect light. These ferns are often grown for their crinkly leaves and the light they receive will affect how crinkled the leaves are. A bird’s nest fern that receives more light, for example, will have more crinkled leaves, while one that receives less light will have flatter leaves. Keep in mind that too much light or direct light will cause the fronds on bird’s nest fern to yellow and die. Care for a Bird’s Nest Fern In addition to light, another important aspect of bird’s nest fern care is its watering. Under ideal circumstances, all ferns would like to have consistently moist, but not wet, soil. However, part of the reason that bird’s nest fern makes an ideal houseplant is that it will tolerate soil that dries out from time to time. Furthermore, this plant does not require the same level of humidity that many other kinds of ferns need, making the care for a bird’s nest fern far more forgiving to the occasionally forgetful houseplant owner than other ferns. Fertilizer should only be given to the plant two to three times a year. Even then, the fertilizer should only be applied at half strength and should only be given during the spring and summer months. Too much fertilizer will cause deformed leaves with brown or yellow spots or edges. Now that you know more about how to grow bird’s nest fern and how easy these plants are to grow, try giving them a place in your home. They make a wonderful and green addition to the less brightly lit rooms in your home.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/birds-nest-fern/birds-nest-fern-care.htm

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wow nice post. wonderful garden .this is great article & nice photography
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Bird Nest Fern
Botanical Name: Asplenium nidus

Bird Nest Fern is one of the easiest types of ferns to grow. This tropical native is fast-growing and will live for many years with good care.

In its natural habitat, it grows as an epiphyte (a plant that grows on trees) in the warm, moist, tropical rain forests. Despite its tropical beginnings, it adapts well to being a house plant. Place your potted fern where it is out of direct sun and away from drafts, which can scorch the fronds. Provide humidity and you'll keep it healthy.

As Bird Nest Fern ages, the oldest, outer fronds will turn brown. This is normal. You can cut them off at the base to keep the plant looking neat.

Those upright fronds tend to be dust-catchers. Keep the broad, shiny fronds dust-free by spraying with water and gently wiping them with a damp cloth. Never use leafshine products on ferns because it can severely damage their delicate fronds.

Repot young plants in spring, every couple years or when the roots fill the pot. If you find that the roots are attached to the pot, run a knife around the inside to loosen them before you can remove the rootball. You may need to break the pot to remove it. It's a good idea to use a container with drainage holes to avoid soggy soil. Take care not to pack down the potting mix; this fern likes a loose mixture.

This fern's problems are few. Watch for scale insects, that look like small, brown discs on fronds. If you find an invasion of these pests, spray with soapy water followed by clean water. Don't use insecticides on ferns because they are easily damaged by chemicals.

http://www.guide-to-houseplants.com/birds-nest-fern.html

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This is really amazing trees of Birds Nest Fern nature garden . it is very beautiful. so great photography. thanks @ctrl-alt-nwo
Have a great day.
my home garden image of original photography.
DSC03483.JPG

DSC03484.JPG

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Beautiful flowers sir always you comes with special gifts like these you are really amazing sir.Thank you so much.

Birds Nest Fern plants are amazing sir this look very similar to ashoka tree which is native plant in our place.

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Birds Nest Fern Care
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71TbtTJYYtL.SX425.jpg

Temperature: Room temperatures between 65-75ºF (18-24ºC) are ideal, and no lower than 55ºF (13ºC).
Light: Most books and guides will agree that bright light without direct sunlight should be provided. However, providing some direct sunlight is great for the Bird's nest fern to grow well, but you need to only provide some morning or a small amount of pre-sunset. The fronds can become pale or have scorch marks on them if the sun is too hot. During the winter the sun is much less harmful to the plant.

Watering: This is a species that loves it's soil to remain moist at all times, but not soggy. Water around the edge of the center rosette to avoid the water becoming stagnant in the center, which may cause rot.
Soil: A peat based potting mix is required. 2 parts peat and 1 part perlite (maybe a little less) is one mixture that will be fine. A peat based mixture with organic material is also good.
Fertilizer: From April - September feed the plant with a weak diluted fertilizer every 2 weeks to encourage new growth and healthy looking leaves.

Re-Potting: The Asplenium nidus does not need a pot change very often because it's roots are very small. Once every 2 years is advised for a mature species and once a year while it's young. These do not generally have a problem with becoming root bound, but have more of an issue with staying stable in the pot - this is because the roots are small and they're usually attached to a tree making their own mount. Watch out to see if the plant is becoming unstable and move to a larger pot if it is.
Humidity: Humidity may need to be improved if it becomes low and the plant is showing signs of being affected by dry air. You can improve the humidity by standing the plant in a humidity tray, a tray of peat moss or use an electronic humidifier.

Propagation: These are propagated by spore sowing which is very difficult for the average indoor grower to carry out. Many ferns can be propagated by division, not this species though.

https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/birds-nest-fern.html

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Now I spend most of my time in Thailand I get to find all sorts of great indoor plants growing in the wild and within gardens. This A.nidus is growing in my neighbors garden attached to the tree in the picture (right of page).
a.nidus.jpg
Although a native to tropical regions - the A.nidus that roots itself on trees has adapted very well to growing in temperate regions as a house plant.

Two reasons it grows well under and attached to trees is because it receives the moisture (humidity) it requires and shade by taking cover from direct sunlight. Indoors we must also provide these humidity levels and provide enough light without direct sunlight to enable the plant to grow well and remain healthy.
birds-nest-fern.jpg
How it looks: Ferns are quite an interesting group of plants to grow indoors because of the various types of fronds they display, so you could have three ferns in one room from the same class and genera that look kind of unrelated.
plants_hero_birdsnest.jpg
The Bird's nest differs from many in appearance because of it's spear like shaped leaves rather than feather or palm like fronds. The leaves (have a brown mid-rib and wavy margin) grow up to about 2ft long from a rosette of fronds where new leaves appear when the plant is producing new growth.

Displaying: While a plant is young and small it can be placed anywhere in a home or office with the correct conditions provided (light, etc.). Once it matures though, you'll need to provide enough space for the rosette of fronds to spread out over 2ft each side. A conservatory is best suited or a fairly large room once it does mature.

Care level: The two main conditions to provide well is enough humidity and to protect the leaves from direct sunlight (they become scorched), although some sunlight is ideal for them. If a person has sufficient living space and can follow the straight forward care instructions below, anyone can grow and maintain them.

https://www.houseplantsexpert.com/birds-nest-fern.html

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You always brings amazing flowers every day sir great information from you,thank you sir.

Really awesome photography my dear and your last photo is very beautiful

The fern is such a rich source of water and nutrients, that often, other ferns and plants may grow on it.

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Birds Nest Fern are amazing sir thank you so much for introducing another variety plants.

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I often find plants like this in my place, he usually lives attached to other trees. We don't know the benefits of this plant and we let it live wild...
Like @ctrl-alt-nwo

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Very special and successful photography
Well, my friend, you are a wonderful person
Very nice article

I think i have seen this somewhere

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You are motherfucker. Fuck off

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Thank you, @ctrl-alt-nwo for the beautiful and high quality photos Asplenium nidus.
And for introducing us to the flora of your native Australia.
In Russia there are ferns, but they look a little different.


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