The Giza Death Star Revisited: A New Steemit Novel Chapter 7

in #writing5 years ago

The Giza Death Star Revisited: A Novel Based on the Work of Joseph P. Farrell


©2017 by Carl Joseph DeMarco




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Prev. Chapters: Ch. 1, Ch. 2, Ch. 3, Ch. 4, Ch. 5, Ch. 6

Chapter 7

Giuseppe Faro was born to Italian parents who came to America just after WWII. He constantly wore an A-2 flight jacket given to his father by a downed American pilot for saving him from German capture. The only time he took it off was for meals and bedtime. He also wore an Australian drover hat, but God only knows why. The outfit was too much for the South Dakota summers, and not enough for the South Dakota winters.

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The iconic A-2 flight jacket

Dr. Faro took full advantage of his new life in America and went on to become one of its most notable men of letters. He graduated from SUNY Stoneybrook with a degree in physics and a minor in history, because he wanted to live at home in the Italian neighborhood in Brooklyn where his family had settled, and he could always get a seat on the train going against rush hour. He went on to get PhDs in both, one from Oxford, the other from Cambridge.

He took up a research position at SDSU where his quirky and Italian mannerisms weren’t the only thing that broke the mold. His research was considered quackery by most in both fields he was qualified in, but no one had been able to debunk any of it. One of his most outrageous claims was that Western physics took a wrong turn down a dead end street with relativity. In fact, he considered Einstein himself to be the real quack. The physicists that followed after him were even worse. He dubbed them the “relativity police.”

It was just as well for SDSU, because his numerous publications attracted a steady stream of loyal if off-beat students and under-the-radar government, defense, and industry contracts that helped the small state university remain solvent and competitive. His former students frequently sent him interesting tidbits of information and discovery from around the globe that supported and furthered his research. Most of his work in physics was devoted to the scalar physics first described by Maxwell in 1861, but then later neglected after Maxwell’s equations were bowdlerized by Oliver Heaviside. This bowdlerization is what led to the wrong turn down dead end “Relativity Row.” It was Faro’s work in scalar physics that put Thomas Bearden on the map with DARPA.

Faro liked the quiet small town life but mourned the lack of good Italian food that kept him forever cooking, as much a hobby as it was a necessity. But being in the upper Midwest, Brookings had some of the best steaks anywhere.

But why would an odd professor of physics and history at a small Midwestern state university be filing away an obscure article from a German newspaper about a museum heist that occurred in the midst of the Iraq war? Because he knows something most people do not. In fact, he knows things most people never even imagine. In fact, he knows things that most people try fervently to forget once they do know them.

When a scholar is competent in more than one field, he is able to put together pieces that specialists miss. We saw in Chapter 2 that such is the case with the Giza Plateau in Egypt.

But that was not always the case. One thing that scientists of every field do is research prior literature to see what work has already been done that may be relevant to theirs. They also scour it for previous work that has gone unnoticed or neglected. Often this research will take them back to the very earliest ponderings of ancient peoples. It’s common for scientists of the 21st Century to revisit and even test the work or observations of the Greeks, or the Babylonians, or even older civilizations.

In exploring the works of Newton, Faro came became intrigued by Newton’s obsession with measuring the Great Pyramid in order to get an accurate measurement of the earth’s circumference so that he could further develop his theory of gravity. This struck Faro as strange: what would measuring the pyramid have to do with the circumference of the earth?

As it turns out, John Greaves and Tito Burattini did measure the Great Pyramid in 1639 and Burattini and Newton both used those measurements to derive the circumference of the earth. This led faro down a spectacular rabbit hole and into all kinds of scientific and historical discoveries, most not his own but those that had been neglected or suppressed. Others, already mentioned, were doing the same thing. Faro just took the work to its farthest extent.

As part of his research, Faro also discovered that the mythologies and legends of ancient people were not so much religion or superstitious mental wanderings, but the encoded science of a “paleo-ancient” civilization, as he put it, indicating that it was far older than the most ancient civilizations already known to historians. Most of his work in this regard was based on the Hermetica which he was able to determine was as much a treatise on the scalar nature of the Universe as it was on human nature. Thus, the alchemical wedding of his interest in physics and his interest in history was accomplished.

There are hundreds of significant mathematical formulae and relationships encoded in the Great Pyramid, from Planck’s constant to the speed of light, to the mass of the Earth, to the value of Pi. But even more so, they are all only close approximations or harmonics thereof. And that was the key to unraveling the “Giza Death Star,” as it came to be called. This realization enabled Faro to take the leap that Dunn landed short of.

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The Giza Plateau appears to be a military complex

The possibility of the Giza Death Star was horrifying enough that Faro was forced to think the unthinkable: The darn thing was sitting right there in the desert. What if someone were to start it up again?

Then on April 20th, 2003, just 10 days after the museum theft, Dr. Faro noticed another headline in the news:

JU-390 TO FLY FROM MUNICH TO BUENOS AIRES FOR AIR SHOW

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“In its first flight in almost 60 years, the world’s only Ju-390 begins a flight of over 11,000 km today from Munich to Buenos Aires for the 2003 Buenos Aires Air Show, which opens in June. Only two of the historic aircraft were ever built, one of them being lost in the chaos of WWII. The plane was originally built as a long range cargo aircraft and strategic bomber for Germany. In one flight during the war it flew round trip from Germany to New York City on a reconnaissance mission without refueling, but never fulfilled its role as a bomber during the war. It is one of the highlights of this year’s show.”

“Huh,” remarked the professor to himself. “Right on Hitler’s birthday. And from Munich no less. And there’s that number 11 again too.” He stuffed it into his “Baghdad Museum Heist” folder.


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