This Is Probably The Longest Article You've Ignored.

in steemit •  last month

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My Answer To A Very Common Question.

- "Why Do You Waste Your Time And Money @hitmeasap?"

I am 28 months old, which means that I've been here for more than 2 years in total. During that time, I've written a total of 778 posts and 5,259 comments. I have never participated in any form of "follow-for-follow" type of deal, and I would never recommend anyone doing that. The same goes for "vote-for-vote" type of schemes. I have never published anything but originally written articles, that I have written myself. I have published dozens of guides and reports in an attempt to educate others, and I started to use "support pillar" rather early in my articles when I described myself. It was a self-proclaimed title, but a title that definitely served its purpose, as it described my Steemit journey in two simple words.

@dan (@dantheman) was the first to give me some real recognition when I joined Steemit. This was in June-July 2016. He saw something in me or my articles, and he was supportive and generous with his votes. He gave me the necessary motivation I needed to put in more time and effort on Steemit and in my articles. Other whales, dolphins and established Steemians followed in his steps and encouraged me to continue. They were supportive and helpful. They boosted my motivation and I felt inspired. I still remember some of the amazing upvotes I got in those days. @blocktrades, @berniesanders and many others were supportive and I remember a fantastic so-called "love bomb" from @fuzzyvest. Simple, yet amazing and beautiful. He selflessly upvoted my article and dozens of comments on my article. All of them recieved upvotes worth several dollars each.

This was in the early days, when it was easier to get rewarded. If you were lucky enough to get an upvote from a whale, you'd get hundreds of dollars. So it's different nowadays.

I was a rookie with no prior crypto- or blockchain experience. As I'm not native in English, I often doubted my own writing skills and never felt like I was good enough, so it would just be a waste of time trying to publish anything at all. Especially articles that I knew I'd spend several hours on. When I joined Steemit, I also quickly realized that anything with boobs got tons of recognition, and obviously upvotes too... And I wasn't really comfortable sharing photos of my man-boobs, so I had to go a different route.

I tried literally everything, but quickly found my own "niche". As a freelancer at the time, (I am a full time student nowadays, and went from ~7 years of freelancing straight back to the school bench), I started to share my knowledge and my expertise in that niche. I wrote and published articles related to freelance, business and other similar topics, and I got rewarded for it. I loved the extra money and I cashed out pretty much everything I could, because it felt amazing to finally have found something I could truly benefit from.

  • I didn't understand better at the time.

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I am far from being a so-called "top-earner" on Steemit and I've never had regular whale or dolphin support, but I have been rewarded well for my contributions. Even as a non-native English speaker. However, like I said previously, I cashed out all my earnings in the early days, so I'm sitting at 1300+ Steem Power today.

Story continues...

While the not so regular support stopped coming my way, I started to feel pressured and I started to lose motivation. I was struggling on a daily basis to find enough energy to publish content and it started to feel unnecessary at times. I knew before I published my articles, that I wouldn't be rewarded for it... But I continued to be active as much as I could. I knew that the "honeymoon period" was all over, and I had to "make a name for myself" if I ever wanted to earn a single dime again.

This continued for a long time. I published articles every now and then, as often as I could, with hopes of getting those amazing upvotes that would give me the opportunity to eat at a not so fancy restaurant. During this time though, something happened. I became more focused on my own content and my approach on Steemit, so I stopped caring about the rewards. I had probably been a member on Steemit for about 3-4 months at this time, so I am well-aware of the fact that I was a so-called taker back in those days...

However, I never knew better. The only thing I could see were all of the insane payouts on the trending pages. Even though I was biased, I knew that my articles where of higher quality than most of the trending ones, but the rewards didn't come my way anymore.

So, even though I knew that I wouldn't get rewarded for my contributions, or that I would earn just a fraction of what I'd earn before, I continued to push myself. I pushed myself so hard that I simply "ran out of gas" at two different occasions...

At this time, a user called @teamsteem started to show his support. With generous upvotes and kind comments, he kept me going. He gave me that little extra motivation-boost and when he had been supporting my content from time to time for about a month, I was eager to know him better. I was eager to see what he did, and how he'd become so successful, and I was able to find what looked like a "pattern".

He used the voting slider to support several authors each day, instead of using his SP and VP to self-vote or vote for only ten different authors. I sort of copied what he did, and I started to support more people. I had also become more familiar with Steemit in general, cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology at this point, so it was easy for me to see that @teamsteem were a superb Steemian to follow. He was the first sort of "role model" I found on Steemit, even after interactions with probably hundreds of people...

I continued on the same path for a long time, and truth to be told, this is still my approach, even though I do it slightly different nowadays, as the co-founder of the @asapers.

I wrote and published articles and I started to focus on others more than myself. I started to see that I could be of help, and that I could inspire, motivate and encourage others in many different ways. I started to refer to myself as a support pillar and I wrote dozens of guides and reports in an attempt to educate others. I was active on steem.chat and I quickly replied to all the messages I got. I even started to reply to all the vote-beggars, in an attempt to change their behaviour, as I could easily see that they did things wrong.

Fast-forward a bit into the future, and we'll end up at one point where @fulltimegeek made me a Steward Of Gondor. At this point, I had already had interactions with awesome people like @abh12345 at several occasions, and I had been walking in the footsteps of @teamsteem in terms of his voting behaviour for several months. I had been supporting hundreds of people per month for a long time, and I had been "spreading the wealth" literally everywhere on the platform. I had also given away Steem and/or SBD numerous times, both as an act of kindness, but also as a token of appreciation or as a donation for a job well-done. I had met many users who I still consider to be my closest friends, on Steemit, and the SOG initiative had been running for some time...

I never believed I'd ever get a chance of serving as an SOG, because truth to be told, I was so positive of the fact that I'd never become nothing near an "established" steemian, and I've never had much luck.

  • I was wrong.

FTG quickly decided to delegate me a large chunk of his Steem Power. I got 5000 Steem Power and I had never felt so strong and powerful before. I quickly saw the immense affect my approach had. My votes were instantly worth ~5 times more and I finally felt that I made a difference. I had an impact and even though I couldn't change a person's life, I could change a person's day. It was an amazing experience to serve as an SOG due to the power I had. Not because I felt better or more powerful than others, but because I could see the difference I made for people. My votes mattered to people, and this was without a doubt the best experience I'd ever had on Steemit. The amazing upvotes from @dan in the beginning of my Steemit "career" or any of the rewards I'd made up until that time wasn't even close to what I felt when I served as an SOG.

I still, to this day, don't know why @fulltimegeek gave me the chance to serve as an SOG. I don't know what he saw in me, if he ever did see something, and truth to be told, even though it would've been rather cool to know the exact details, it doesn't matter in the end. What matters, is the fact that FTG, with this initiative and his generosity, empowered me. His idea, intentions and his mindset gave me such a motivation-boost and he inspired me, like I'd never been inspired before... His actions, are the reason for the @asapers... His approach encouraged me, and truth to be told, he gave me the much needed reason I needed, so that I could continue my efforts and to strive towards new heights.

I can totally understand that you're tired by now, and even though I've filled this article with tons of history already, there's no chance for me to share it all. This is just a fraction of everything... And I've had to jump back and forth a little bit, so the actual time line aren't accurate by any means, even though I've tried to be as detailed as I can.

With all this being said and done, I understand that everyone can't agree with me, my intentions or my approach. I understand that some of you would never take the same path as me, and I can relate to most of you. I fully understand that some of you would never take the same actions, share the same feelings, or take the same actions as me... However, we are all unique.

  • You do you, and I do me.

I have recently started to push people to 500 SP, and we've had great success. 4 out of 4 users have been successfully pushed into the minnow-category because of my idea, and because of community effort. Even though Steemit might seem like a dark and nasty place filled with greed and selfishness, we've been able to fight back. We've teamed up to fight for our, and others survival, and we've been successful. We are still just a small group of people and we could easily be 10 times bigger, but we've had great results and we've accomplished something outstanding. Together. As a unit. Truth to be told, I joined Steemit in july 2016, and the things I am most proud of, is the @asapers project and this new on-going "make minnow" project. These things makes me believe in a better place. These things gives me hope and encouragement...

And I truly believe that we can change people's lives with Steemit and the blockchain.

Do you still remember the question at the top?

"Why Do You Waste Your Time And Money @hitmeasap?"

This is the best possible answer I can give anyone that asks.

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Thanks for sharing your Steemit story. It is very encouraging to see that, even if you struggle from time to time, you can make a difference in the end. This gives me, and probably a lot of other relatively new members, the motivation to keep blogging, commenting and curating. Thank you so much and keep up the good work!

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I appreciate it @erikklok, and you're totally correct. This place can be very hard at times, but you'll always have the chance to grow and make other cool things, depending on your approach and mindset. :)

quite a journey and somehow I saw some of the parts there as similiar to what I did and I had a somewhat self title of a community builder and social engager.

I took pride of helping build several communities and becoming a main stay of Asher's league of engagement and I thiought that I was helping the platform be socially engaged.

Then it happened after almost 9 months in the platform I got burn out. It was a lot of factors and no matter how much I pushed myself to get my A game back I just could not muster enough energy.

Nowadays it is Steem Monsters and bananafish story lines that still keep me posting in Steemit, a lot of my hopes and dreams lay shattered and in limbo all because I can't motivate myself enough anymore.

A lot of good people tried their best and be there and talk to me but I don't know I simply lacked the motivation.

Hopefully I can go back someday and not because of the price of Steem but because I enjoy it once again.

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Hopefully I can go back someday and not because of the price of Steem but because I enjoy it once again.

I can totally understand and relate with that feeling. And even though I might not be able to give you the motivation you need, I think it's a superb time to start now, while the prices are low. It gives you a great chance of growing your account in a more rapid way.

I wish you the best of luck, and I hope you'll find the strength you need. :)

I read the first paragraph and scrolled down to like/resteem... going back to read the rest. I sure hope it doesn't turn out to be about Britney Spears! ...brb

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lol. Nope, not about Britney. It's more likely that I'd write about Kardashian if something... ;)

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PHEW! Yeah, no Britney here. The part about the manboobs was a little too close to Spearsian territory for comfort though. I got a little worried for a minute. Har har har.

But seriously, I love what you have to say here. You were one of the first steemians to come along and sprinkle some happy on my efforts back when I got started. So hearing about how you got your own start is a warm and fuzzy story for me. Keep doing what you're doing. There may be more selfish people on here than there are thougtful caring types but I see more and more goodguys coming on board all the time! We need to stick together so they can find us when they start looking around for good company.

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Haha, no need to worry. I'm not that type of person who'd ever share photos like that. But in case you still feel that you're missing out, take a look at this:

There may be more selfish people on here than there are thougtful caring types but I see more and more goodguys coming on board all the time!

This is very true, and also much needed for the growth of the platform. Like you said, we need to stick together so they can find us. :)

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ACK!!! I've been nothing but nice to you! Two can play at this game! As soon as I can stop ralphing, you're really gonna get it!

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Haha what?! I've been nice as well?! I think he's cute. ;)

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😂 ralph!

Well, not sure about that! I'm using @steempeak for everything these days, and it gives a little message at the top, which says "11 minute read." But I'm a fast reader...

ANYWAY...

I think those of us who are dedicated to building community on Steemit — whether a long timer like you, or a relative newcomer like me (6 months) — do what we do because we think about long term benefits, as well as how we can benefit ALL, not just ourselves.

I read a lot about the early days of Steemit when I first got, as well as about the ongoing issues people were struggling with. I was particularly inspired by @stellabelle writing about the idea of this as a "gift economy" and by @lukestokes who wrote a piece about what amounts to "selfish altruism;" the basic idea that through helping others we are actually helping ourselves.

I understand why you do what you do, and I try to follow suit. Building something like Steemit for the long term isn't about "me," it's about "us." I wish more people understood that.

=^..^=

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"selfish altruism;" the basic idea that through helping others we are actually helping ourselves.

Yeah, I remember that one. True in many ways!

Building something like Steemit for the long term isn't about "me," it's about "us." I wish more people understood that.

Indeed. People tends to ignore the "us"-part and focus on themselves at all times. That's basically the opposite of the initial idea of Steemit. At least the idea I had when I started to realize how powerful Steemit can be.

Thanks for a great read. It is really helpful when the more established accounts take the time to document a bit of their journey. There are lots of little guys like me who are still choosing a path. I often read back through old posts from larger accounts just to learn things.
Sometimes I encounter people here who don't get why I do some of the things I do.

You do you, and I do me.

I like that.
Honestly I am here because I didn't want to miss out on the next minnow making event 🙂

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I often read back through old posts from larger accounts just to learn things.

This is something I used to do until a few months ago. Not really to learn new things, but to see how people have changed along the way with their continuous Steemit success. Some of the things you'll see is pretty scary actually, even though there might be some logical reasons for it.

Don't worry, I'll tag you in the next "minnow making"-post, so you won't miss it. :)

I can really relate to what you're saying. Just a couple of hours ago I was talking with @paulag about how I had the luxury to be able to buy my way up to 5000SP, and how good it felt to be able to actually make a difference in other people's SteemIt experience, and for some maybe even in their lives.

I have never had any support from the bigger accounts, but I did get a whole lot of support from people that were at the same level as me, or smaller. I truly believe the community effort - even without the big stakeholders - can have a big impact on the platform and it's users.

And now I have grown my account, there are so many possibilities to empower others. I must admit I feel like the queen of the world :0)

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I truly believe the community effort - even without the big stakeholders - can have a big impact on the platform and it's users.

Exactly. The worst part is that so many Steemians seems to believe that they can't be successful without the support of dolphins or whales. Many of them doesn't seem to see the true powers of community effort.

I must admit I feel like the queen of the world :0)

I can definitely relate to that (well not the queen-part). It's an amazing feeling! :)

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There is nothing wrong with getting some support. Especially if you put in a lot of effort in trying to help out the community. I'm sure the people from @asapers would agree with me ;0)

Of course community efforts are a great way to build a stronger community, but some support from bigger accounts is always a good motivation.

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Yeah, certainly. A vote from a big-sized account immediately affects the rewards, which is why people want those votes to start with. However, votes worth $0,03, isn't much if you get only one vote... But 100's of them will yield great results too. But it seems like many users seems to forget that part.

Quite a steem journey. You've defo got the right approach to this place.

It was quite a manageable read btw..

Steem's made a difference to my life for sure, and I get the feeling this is very much just the beginning!

Posted using Partiko Android

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I get the feeling this is very much just the beginning!

Yeah, I guess it can be. I don't know about Steemit, but for Steem, it's definitely the beginning.

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Yup very fair point! One of my misssions this wknd is to try and get my head around recent devd and sort out my delegations.

Posted using Partiko Android

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That sounds like a good plan, and it should keep you busy for some time too. :D

Wow this was great and inspiring

Posted using Partiko iOS

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Thank you @stellabelle, I'm glad you liked it. :)

And now you're the role model for other Steemians! You're not wasting your time - you're spreading kindness all over the world!

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Thank you very much @phoenixwren, I don't know about being a role model or not, but I do my best to contribute in ways I believe strongly in. :)

What a cool journey you have been on @hitmeasap...…. you've brought lots to the community and I really like the results from the minnow making project. I hop you can keep on powering up these days.....hope all is going well with the studies. CC

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Thanks crypto. :)
Yeah, the minnow making-project is amazing and have had great success so far. It's really awesome to see the community pushing others into minnow-status. I do my best to grow my account, but I'll probably need to cash out a bit in a week or so, but we'll see.

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I'll try and stay a bit more connected to you project here - you have great passion for it and an admirable mission. Catch you on discord.

I also look forward to the day when I can make a difference in someone's day/life. I remember the first time my vote granted the author .01 and that made me feel great! I'm getting there lol

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You'll get there eventually. Slow and steady. :)

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Yep! I'm laying the groundwork now and it gets better each day :) It really is good to hear the tales of folks that came before and also to hear of the roadblocks that popped up along the way. Glad to hear you were not derailed and are still here being the pillar you've always been!

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Thank you very much, I appreciate it. I think it's important to share all sorts of things, so people get a better understanding in general. Many users comes here with beliefs of making hundreds of dollars per day... And they think like that due to inaccurate or even false advertising.

The first thing they'll see whenever they come here, is also the bogus trending page, and they won't realize that those articles sits there due to paid votes... They write a post or two, earns nothing and leave. - And that's obviously bad for the entire platform.

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You're so right! A few people have come here because I told them it was a great place to blog and earn. They said the learning curve was too great and the earnings were miniscule. These were people who wanted something for nothing I guess. There is no instant success here. To my way of thinking, I simply invited the wrong people lol.

It took me at least 5 minutes to ignore all that! 😆
Like @headchange, I dropped by to check on news on the next minnow making event.
It's interesting to hear how your views on Steeming have changed. I did wonder why someone with your outlook would be so comparatively low on SP after having been here so long, if you've been doing what you do. We have to have a reason to keep contributing on here and you always did, but it evolved quite a lot. I believe had it stayed the same for you, you wouldn't still be here. I'm glad you are though.

How's the next minnow hunt going? I have a candidate, but she's not quite at 450 yet, so maybe soon.

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I think we have a good candidate to push next time, but we're certainly looking for more users. So any recommendations would be great!

I'm thinking of pushing people each monday, but I'm not entirely sure yet. I'll keep you updated though. :)

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Having a day would be good. I can try and remember to drop by that way. I can't always guarantee having much steem spare, but will see what I can do. Last time I'd just had a nice payout due to a generous vote from canadiancoconut. Felt that was definitely worth paying forward.

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Yeah, no worries. This is more about something than nothing, and everything counts! :)

Hi @hitmeasap!

Your post was upvoted by @steem-ua, new Steem dApp, using UserAuthority for algorithmic post curation!
Your UA account score is currently 5.379 which ranks you at #613 across all Steem accounts.
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In our last Algorithmic Curation Round, consisting of 266 contributions, your post is ranked at #14.

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