The Saga of the House - more drainage disasters

in homeowning •  2 months ago

When I first moved in, I noticed that the one bathroom was well below the ground level and that there was damp in the walls, exacerbated by the fact that there was an outside tap next to this wall. Now that other renovations and the kitchen sink mess have been sorted out, it was time to turn our attention to the other side of the house as a matter of urgency before the summer rains start.

side wall.jpg

It has taken the handyman a day and a half to excavate this much soil, rubble and rotten concrete. Strong man.

As you can see, whichever genius created the paved walkway thought nothing of packing soil and rubble above the foundation line, against an unsealed wall.

sewerage pipes.jpg

The house foundation is on three levels so once we have cleared the soil away from the wall and made a concrete gutter, we will have to put in steps at each level, make the walkway much lower and build a low retaining wall on the other side to divert rainwater away from the house.

step.jpg

Because of the tap next to the house and the kitchen sink being unconnected to the sewer, there were plenty of tree roots and a massive one going under the house foundation - the root pictured below is more than 10 cm in diameter

root.jpg

Now that their water supplies have been cut, I expect that more trees will die. So far, 2 have died. I was surprised when I first moved in that there were so many trees living in such a hot, arid landscape and I assumed that they had their roots in the drains. Some probably do but their main water supply has been all the leaks and spectacularly bad building practice.

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That's quite thick a root!

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Like a huge snake!

You have a lot of work to do!
It turns out that part of the wall of the house was underground?!

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Unbelievable, but it's true! I'm amazed that anyone could have done such a stupid thing

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I'm impressed!
This I see for the first time!
Your photo can be published in the program:
"obvious and incredible !!!"
:-)))

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The whole house is like this!

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Never fun to deal with foundation issues. Is your foundation brick?

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Never fun to deal
With foundation issues. Is
Your foundation brick?

                 - kansuze


I'm a bot. I detect haiku.

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It's a concrete slab with a brick exterior, the house is built on a rock formation

I went through those issues with my house, too. We had to completely excavate around the house 8 feet down to fix the drainage problems. It was a hassle but it is good knowing things are done right.

Posted using Partiko Android

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That sounds even worse! At least mine will be fine once the rainwater is diverted

So the trees have had their own secret irrigation system, but seriously whoever did that must be pretty silly.

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It's mindboggling!

Oh god.. this has been quite a journey! I hope you can get some peace soon with house. At the end, I know it'll be an increible place! Btw.. How's Yoda doing?

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It will be a big improvement once this is completed so we are almost there

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Look foward to it

Lots of hard work rectifying it

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I'm glad to have a strong man to get this digging done

he whole trouble is that you do not have vertical waterproofing of the walls. Ground moisture absorbs well into the brick and then migrates to the interior of the house.
In addition, the sewage pipes pass next to the wall. This is not allowed. According to our standards, they must pass from the wall at a distance of 1 m.
You do not have a manhole to clean the sewer if it clogs.

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It's unbelievable that the wall wasn't waterproofed.
Fortunately, our ground does not freeze in winter so it doesn't matter if the sewer pipe is close to the wall and it doesn't need a huge manhole. There is a small inspection port exposed. I just need to cover these pipes properly now

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At us under existing specifications all designs of walls from a brick or concrete should have a vertical waterproofing. If it is absent, moisture from the ground easily permeates the construction of the wall and then into the interior of the house. On your photo I see that the horizontal waterproofing of the brickwork of the walls from the foundation of the house is done. I think that before the harvest.

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In our climate, horizontal waterproofing is sufficient. So long as you don't pile soil above the horizontal waterproofing line, of course