Black and Ethnic minorities still a minority in English football

in football •  13 days ago




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SteemSports Editor: @ldauch


England and the premier League is considered to be one of the most multi-culturally accepting societies and professions in the world, but according to a sports think tank, lead by former footballer Jason Roberts, coaches from black and ethnic minority backgrounds still face "institutionally embedded barriers" in English football.

The Sports People's Think Tank's (SPTT) annual report says progress since 2014 has been "minimal" for black and ethnic minority candidates.

Of the 482 senior coaching roles in England’s top four leagues, only 22 are held by a black and ethnic minority background (4%), and the think tank wants English football to adopt the ‘Rooney Rule’.



Chris Hughton is the only BAME coach in the Premier League


The Rooney Rule, named after the former American Football club owner Dan Rooney, was introduced by the NFL in 2003 and states that at least one ethnic minority candidate must be interviewed for each senior coaching position.

The research by SPTT, working with Loughborough University and the anti-discrimination group Fare (Football Against Racism in Football), looked at six positions in football, from first-team manager to lead coach of the under-18s.

The statistics gathered are from before the appointments of Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink at Northampton and Jack Lester at Chesterfield, but there can still be no doubting that people from minorities are not well represented in coaching professional football.


Jimmy Hassailbank is in charge at Northampton

Since the appointments of Hasselbaink and Lester, the number of black or ethnic minority managers in the 92 clubs to is now five - along with Carlisle's Keith Curle, Nuno Espirito Santo at Wolves and Brighton's Chris Hughton.

SPTT claim, however, that the improvements come from a few progressive clubs, who have a track record of hiring coaches from minorities, so there really hasn’t been any improvement. They also state that the vast majority of coaches are former players and BAME players make up nearly a third of all squads, so the report concluded that "institutionally embedded barriers which have restricted opportunities for BAME coaches in the past, remain firmly in place".

The English Football League introduced their own version of the Rooney Rule, making it mandatory for clubs to interview a candidate from black and ethnic minority background for academy jobs but not first-team roles.



Keith Curle is in charge at Carlisle


Progress has been made, however. It was piloted only last season, and now all clubs in the Football League have signed up to extend the trial to cover first-team vacancies.

The executive director of Fare, Piara Powar, says the government and the Premier League have been too slow to implement changes though and claims the Premier League are caught in a cycle that they seem to show little care of changing.

Since the Football League’s version of the Rooney Law was implemented, there have been 76 jobs with 1497 applications. Of those applications there were 170 from minority backgrounds (11%) and 11 minority candidates actually got some of the 76 jobs (14%).



Jack Lester is now in charge at Chesterfield


It's not an easy topic to get right, because clubs must hire the best man for the job. And we don't want a time where clubs are fearful to sack a coach just because of his background, so there is a lot of work that needs doing gradually. However, by looking at the latest Football League figures we can see vast improvements, but even at 14% it still very low representation for ethnic minorities, especially in the Premier League where only Chris Hughton of Brighton is at the helm.

Sources:
www.itv.com
www.bbc.co.uk
www.dailymail.co.uk
www.mirror.co.uk




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Although they are black or minorities ethnic but they have done great contribution in English football

good job for them

WTF.. how stupid is this??!?

This is only soccer (don't know about American football): Professional head coaches are usually 45+ years old and when the share of black players 25 years ago was smaller than today, it makes a lot of sense that the share of black coaches equals the share of black players from back then and not their share of today.

When you look at Dutch football you will see that there are plenty of black (or whatsoever colored) coaches with Kluivert, Seedorf, Gullit, Winter, Roy, Van Gobbel, Reiziger and Rijkaard (did I forget someone?) because the Dutch had plenty of colored players in the 90s.

How can you be sooo f*cking stupid. Seriously, how is this possible?

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from era of dutch players you mentioned, there were Ince, Wright, King, Heskey, Dublin, A. Cole, Campbell, Dyer, Jenas, Vassel, L. Ferdinand.. (only in eng nat team)

it is bit stupid, but not THAT stupid lol

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Half of the Dutch players are or have been coaching big teams and the English players...

  • Ince became a restless manager with 6 teams in 8 years and that kills your career no matter what color your skin has (think of Matthäus)
  • Wright became coach and then TV commentator, so he's in a very small privileged group of people now
  • King has broken knees and (Wiki) "He continues to represent Tottenham Hotspur on an ambassadorial level." I'd call that part-time management to keep him busy.
  • Heskey was playing till 2016, so maybe he's just cooling off right now
  • Dublin is now a big time sports commentator, not that bad as 2nd career
  • Andy Cole has a broken kidney
  • Campbell is now a conservative politician and therefore in a different quota system
  • Dyer is coach in Ipswich (soo... check)
  • Jenas is 34 and a bit too young to judge his degree of oppression
  • never heard about Vassel
  • Ferdinant was always a bit of an idiot (Wiki -> "Ferdinand announced his intention to become a professional boxer")

Bottom line: Nope, there is zero evidence that England's black players are discriminated in any visible way in their post-player career. They are doing just fine (except of course for Cole).

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it was Les not Rio ^ i forgot about Rio already.. like totally.

Vassel.. Darius.

and im not talking about discrimination, just that there were just enough black players in England A team.

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But the claim is that there is discrimination against black people when it comes to coaching jobs and that is completely made-up.

Les Ferdinand is even more of a prove against that claim. He's now "caretaker manager" for QPR...

Overall, I'd say non-white English players are actually quite privileged.

edit

and just fyi Rio Ferdinand...total player

lol^^

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lol i couldnt talk about PL, without notcing whole fuckin NBA players/coaches ratio first ^^

poor Rio.. he was just about to shine when Nemanja arrived, and stole his defence... :D

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There has been a think tank looking into it and the stats speak for themselves. As @interceptor mentioned there were many black English players in the 90s, but many managers aren't 90s footballers.

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which think tank? I tend to never trust them because they are politicized too much.

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If you read the article its mentioned in there, in fact that is what the article is about: the think tanks findings.

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hmm if it's that one this seems to be just another left-progressive brain-dead-child but nothing you can take seriously. Once more, a waste of money and attention.

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I don't think so and I would say they are underrepresented at the top coaching levels. I don't personally believe the clubs are being racist, but why aren't there more? Is it their attitude once theyre rich and retired? Who knows...

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but why aren't there more?

Maybe because of the insane competition in the PL?

Here are the head coaches of the top 7 PL teams: Morinho, Wenger, Benitez, Klopp, Guardiola, Pochettino, Conte.

Not a single one of them is from Britain. So, why should black English football coaches be more common than their white counterparts?

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•cough• •the bell curve• •cough•

Thanks for this sports info Although they are black or minorities ethnic but they have done great contribution in English football ⚽ Iappreciate your post @steemsports