Timeless Content versus Timely Content - Or How Steemit Can Lock Itself Out Of Business In One Easy Step

10 months ago
72 in business

When I decided to test Steemit for 30 days there were a few things I didn’t know about it. The economics were quite foggy (but now they’re getting clearer), the curation part was somehow ignored (but now I see it as an important part of the whole project) and I wasn’t aware of the whole ecosystem of websites built on top of the blockchain to make everything easier: steemstats.com, streemian.com, steemwhales.com and many others.

But out of the things I didn’t know at at time (and it was an assumed decision to dive in with limited knowledge) there is one that stands out. It is a thing so important that may create the cause for Steemit implosion. I stand by my words. If there’s something that may bring the whole beautiful idea behind Steem down, then this is it. It’s not the price spiraling down (it’s quite understandable, after the Jully bubble and given the very, very low volume), it’s not even the so-called dumping by @ned and @dan (seriously, folks, can you start minding your money instead worrying about other people’s money? It’s their Steem, they can do whatever they want with it, just chill).

This thing is the fact that after 30 days you stop getting paid for your content. After 30 days, you can’t even edit your post anymore (the posts gets archived, as it’s stated in the release notes for the latest Steemit version, [0.14.2] (https://github.com/steemit/steem/releases/tag/v0.14.2).

Now that’s a potentially huge deal breaker. Let me explain why.

Timeless Content versus Timely Content

Timeless content is content that is not created around a certain time event. It’s not news. It’s not an announcement about something that happened or will happen. It’s content that may be read 3-4-5 years from the moment of creation and still offer some value. One example of this type of content would be Wikipedia. But there are many others: poetry, prose, art, photography or any other content that deals with evergreen topics, from self-help to relationships.

Timely content is content that is created because of a certain time event. It’s news. It’s an announcement about something that happened or will happen. Once the specific event is consumed, that content becomes irrelevant. It won’t be useful to anyone 3-4-5 years after the moment of creation. Who cares about a Madonna concert that happened 4 years ago?

At this moment, Steemit is completely locking out timeless content and it favors 100% timely content. By archiving the posts after 30 days and stopping the payment process, it renders that content irrelevant after that time window.

So your content pays off on Steemit only for 30 days. That changes everything. I leave apart the fact that this should be very clearly stated in the website, like “write and get paid , but only for 30 days”. It’s a very young project, things are changing, etc, etc. But in time, this could become a serious liability, the type that can get Steemit to court.

That also means that even the curation process is not designed to create a meaningful repository of content but merely to push on the front page the things that will attract more eyeballs. It favors memes, clickbait and very short time windows for the front page.

Even the title for this article had to include some clickbait, otherwise it wouldn’t have attracted any attention.

Don’t get me wrong, there’s nothing intrinsically bad with that. 9gag is a meme sites and it’s doing well. To a certain point, even reddit is a site where the spectacular is favored instead of the useful.

But that changes entirely the type of content you can consume on Steemit and the amount of financial value you can get.

I’m very sorry to say that, but in this new scenario (new for me, anyway) Steemit is actually a failed project. It will end up paying peanuts to a few stay at home kids that are digging the internet for memes.

Not to mention the implications for the monetary system behind it. There is this very stark contradiction between favoring volatile content and locking contributors in for 2 years. It’s like they’re saying: “you should stay glued to your computer, hunting for funny content that can be consumed in the subway, and you should do this for at least two years”. The value of Steem in two years may be well close to the value of a blank piece of paper.

Long Tail Content versus FOMO

This strategy flaw in the positioning of Steemit is more profound. I can see the fight they’re fighting trying to find a sweet spot where they could generate and retain the maximum amount of value.

Because there are a couple of trends in social media today that are fragmenting the market big time, to the point of disruption. I see two schools of thought: one is about “long tail content” and the other one is about FOMO (fear of missing out).

In the “long tail content” school of thought, the social network relies on the persistency of the content in order to create user retention. You go on Facebook because you know your favorite pages will post interesting stuff and you know it will be there for you to consume it anytime. Even if you missed something in your feed, you can go directly to that page and read what you missed. It’s there. It’s not going anywhere. It’s not going to be deleted.

In the “FOMO” school of thought, prominently represented by Snapchat, the social network relies on the volatility of content in order to create user engagement. You go to Snapchat because you know the content won’t be there tomorrow an you’re afraid you’re missing out. If you don’t go today, you’ll miss Gary Vaynerchuk rants about entrepreneurship and hustle and that will make you feel sad.

Somewhere in the middle is Steemit. They’re forced to have content persistency (because everything in the blockchain lives forever) but they put value only on the FOMO types of interactions. In my opinion, this spot is a losing one. I’m gonna show you why.

Real World Examples Of Timeless Content

Here are a few real screenshots of some of my posts, written back in 2009-2010.

100 ways

As you can see, even after 5 years, I still get around 1500-2000 unique users per month, for a single post.

14 ways to say yes

This is even more interesting, because the traffic is actually getting higher as the post goes older.

If I would put AdSense on these pages, I would make money (it’s a personal choice not to put AdSense, because I monetize differently, but AdSense is the easiest way to make my point). And I will make money simply because some of the people consuming my content will also be interested in some of the ads. The click ratio is infinitesimal and advertising itself is not a very productive way to monetize, but that’s not the point. The point is that, in the “long tail content” strategy, I still make money without extra effort. And this is legit money. The economics behind it is ok. Everybody gets some value.

The compound effect states that, if I pile up small gains every day, I will become a millionaire. And that’s true.

In other words, the chances for me to win the lottery in 10 years, versus the chances of me becoming millionaire in 10 years by the means of the compound effect are greatly in favor of the compound effect.

Alas, Steemit is playing the lottery card. Give your best in a 30 days window and maybe you will make it big. We don’t care what happens after 30 days. The content is there because it’s in the blockchain but we don’t care and we don’t let other users to pay you for that.

The Step By Step Process Of Steem Locking Itself Out

What follows is a parody, and by no means I encourage anybody to do this. The goal of the next part is to raise a flag and find solutions.

Step 1: On the 29th day after each article, go to that article and modify it like this: Title: “a”. Body: “b”. Tags: “c”,”d”,”e”. Click “Update”.

That’s it. That’s the only step.

You took your money over the 30 days window, now you take your content (because it’s yours, you know) and publish it somewhere else: Medium, Facebook your blog, etc.

What’s left of Steemit if all 35.000 active users will do this now? (I know there are over 100.000 users but I personally think 65.000 are bots).

Potential Solutions

Here are my thoughts on this one and I really encourage founders and people from the community to give me some feedback or come up with better ideas:

  • decrease the power of a vote proportionally with the publication date of an article. In the 24 hours it has a certain ratio, then it decreases for the next 30 days, then it decreases again for the next 2 years and so on. 2 years is the time in which you can completely dry up your Steem Power so it makes sense to retain a certain voting power while you still have SP in your account. But I think even after 10 years the vote should be relevant. The analogy is with a vintage car: you still like a vintage car, even if you cannot ride with it. There is appreciation there. So the vote may be worth 0.00000001 of a Steem, but still be there.

  • implement google analytics in articles (or any other possibility to track your own content) in order to know what works for the long term and what doesn’t. Each platform has a different type of audience and authors need to know how to better serve their readers. This can be done at the website level, it doesn't need to sit in the blockchain.

  • show publicly the versions of an article with an easy visual indicator of the difference between the original and the current. For instance, an article who was heavily edited, to the point where it’s completely different form the original, should have a red badge: “attention, this version is 79% different from the original”. It will be a way to indicate to readers that the content is not representative anymore.

The Opportunity Cost

The real cost of Steemit failing is not financial. As a truly revolutionary project, it can have a huge impact over the entire content production on this planet. It can heavily disrupt businesses like Facebook or Twitter. If it fails, it will make the process of evolution in this area much slower, because it may act as an example of “this is not possible, you saw what happened to Steemit, stay with us, the centralized mammoths who are taking all the profits while selling your content to ruthless advertisers invading your privacy.”

If you resonate with this article, please resteemit, it doesn’t consume your voting power and helps other people to better understand the intricacies of Steemit.


I'm a serial entrepreneur, blogger and ultrarunner. You can find me mainly on my blog at Dragos Roua where I write about productivity, business, relationships and running.


Dragos Roua

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Sort Order:  trending
75
  ·  10 months ago

Steem power pays for content older than 30 days. Any traffic that comes from old content that leads to new users, earns me money because I have steem power

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Can you bring more details to this? Is there a direct link between SP and new users? Or it's just the fact that, by having more influence, the potential upvotes of new users will generate more value for you?

71
  ·  10 months ago

I've mentioned this very thing. I don't understand why they complicate things for themselves. Geeks I guess. The "if it's not broke fix it until it is." syndrome. I see no need for "payouts" to be broken up into two discrete time frames then canceled after that.

Why not pay as you go? When post get's an upvote..credit the account, forever, any time there is a vote.
. Why be complicated about it?
I think you are optimistic about the number of live accounts.
Waaaaaay optimistic.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Do you have some specific info about this or it's just a feeling? I'm talking about the number of the accounts.

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71
  ·  10 months ago


And other reports like it.

Notice the number of active authors? About 1400 people a day.
Notice the number of active curators? about 4000 a day. I'm fairly certain that there are curation bots. How hard would it be to program a general purpose 'comment' for the 'bot when it voted?

I'm pretty sure, from checking profiles, that many if not most of my most lucrative posts are upvoted by botswarms.

That said...Steemit is no different that FaceBook. A little more raw, less sophisticated, cruder but less domineering.

I'll probably stay until the end.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

I think we're talking about power users here. Like, you know, users who are engaging daily with Steem. But apart from these users are also lurkers, people who wait, who don't have the time to fully engage yet. In my personal experience recommending Steemit I saw that barely one in ten is becoming a power user. But the other 9 are still humans. Their are not bots. So multiplying the number of active curators by 9 gives about 36.000 real users.

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71
  ·  10 months ago

Only daily?
If I'm awake I'm online.
most of the time that I'm online I'm on steemit.

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66
  ·  10 months ago

Thank you for posting @dragosroua. Yes, there are those who have their toes in the water and not yet fully engaged....watching, waiting.....for a business like model if you will that enables worthy content for profit rather than prostitution of self.

The title is well said. Lovely aliteration usage. All the best. Thank you for the opportunity to express thought. Cheers.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Thanks for being around and success to you too! :)

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63
  ·  10 months ago

Great info. It would be interesting to see the results of http://truthy.indiana.edu/botornot/ on this platform.

65
  ·  10 months ago

Yes, pay in perpetuity immediately in sp.
And do the minnow math!!

64
  ·  10 months ago

Hey thanks I didnt know you stop getting paid after 30days, I agree with what your saying and I had the same thoughts of editing posts just as you showed. I mean if we need to stay 2 years why does our content only last for 30 days? Also I have a question can we repost the same content later without getting in trouble with the bots or flagged? upvoted also

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72
  ·  10 months ago

See the answer above for @mws, you can repost but in the end reposting will hurt steemit.com as a whole.

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63
  ·  10 months ago

There are now bots that detect this and leave nagbot messages your thread, killing votes and conversation. The 5 che etah bot accounts even have a rule that complains about re-occuring polls, calendars, status updates if it detects they are similar.

The main reason people are reposting is because the delete and edit commands were removed. It's your content, there is no reason you should not be able to repost it.

62
  ·  10 months ago

Thanks for sounding the alarm on this. I am concerned about these aspects of Steemit as well. I worry about what happens if the image hosting service I'm using goes out of business and I have to migrate all the images for my posts to a new service. If I can't edit my really old posts to change the image links, such an event would effectively ruin all my posts. And I value my old posts. I look at my overall blog as a resume of sorts; someone viewing my profile might skim over my list of old posts to see what kind of content I write and decide if I'm worthy of being followed. So being able to always edit posts is quite important, as is being able to see the history of edits which should be easy given the nature of blockchain based storage.

Also, I want to be able to vote on old posts and still get a curation reward for it. The way it is now, I have no particular incentive to vote on posts which are past their initial payment period (other than altruistically wanting to be nice to the authors). It's sad that even the best, most craftily written posts only get a brief 15 minutes of fame before being consigned to the dustbin of blockchain history. Let them live on forever, in the same way that well written books can effectively generate lifetime royalties for their authors!

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Thanks for the support. I host all the images on one of my servers, but I understand that this may not be the case for everybody and I confess I didn't even think at this, until you brought it up and yes, it's a valid concern. There are people who rely entirely on images for their presence here on Steem it (art, photography, quilling, etc) and they can be easily "erased" by not being able to edit their image links.

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62
  ·  10 months ago

You're welcome. In fact, I consider this point to be so important that I've gone ahead and resteemed your post. Here's hoping The Powers That Be see this and take it under consideration.

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66
  ·  10 months ago

That's two very good points. I did not think of the image hosting aspect. That scenario would not be fun. And as for the 30 day payout. Yup, it also buts a drag on the sharing of content.

Ex. I had a follower re-steem one of my 30+ day old posts and it picked up a chunk of fresh upvotes, but since it doesn't pay anything he said he would only resteem less than 30 day content going forward. That's less sharing of my content now.

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63
  ·  10 months ago

That happened to me! Imgur lost my pics right after they disabled edit and delete. Now my event calendar is out of date and I cannot add to it, my blog landing page has broken links, and my product-reviews have broken images. I can't fix or delete any of them.
It's sad to watch such a good idea get ruined in less than 3 months.

64
  ·  10 months ago

I am not sure that it will cause steemit to fail, but it is a severe limit, and a strong disincentive for authors to provide good, lasting content. To be fair, they do have a good design reason for the limit, in that the entire block chain has to fit in memory for every miner and witness.

In the white-paper, the authors envisioned a reddit like system. If that were the case, the 30 day limit probably wouldn't be such a problem, but curators seem to be driving steemit away from that to something more like a blogging platform. If curators want to neutralize the limit, I guess they could deemphasize top-level posts and emphasize comments, to steer steemit back towards reddit, but that would probably attract a largely different user community from the one that's here now.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Design-wise, storing the entire content in the blockchain is not that difficult. They could keep in the blockchain just the references for the actual posts and a bit of meta-data (revision number and delta-modifications, sort of like a versioning system in which you store just the differences between various versions) and the actual files in a distributed filesystem. Even beyond the current design, platforms like NXT/Ardor could allow spin-offs in child blockchains. I don't see the technical implementation as a bottleneck.

The actual bottleneck might be initial vision, where founders envisioned something reddit-like. I've read the white paper and I don't remember the word "clone", but there were many references and probably reddit was a big inspiration. But as the community grows and the direction of Steemit becomes clearer, they may realize that they can't build a Reddit clone, because, you know, Reddit is already there :).

The tradeoff is between of "just another Reddit-clone", and the "first ever Steemit". That's what I wanted to say by "opportunity cost". They do have a big opportunity with this project.

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64
  ·  10 months ago

Now that you mention it, I think I may have read somewhere about plans to integrate with IPFS. Not sure, though...

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60
  ·  10 months ago

In the roadmap, perhaps?

46
  ·  10 months ago

I voted for your entry, please reciprocity)))) @romanovsv

63
  ·  10 months ago

Regarding the value of older posts, this is something I sometimes do...

If I find a post that I like, and it is older than 30 days, I go to the person's blog and read posts they may have from the last 30 days and possibly up vote them. In fact, if I find their newer content to be something I am on the fence about up voting, I will up vote one anyway since I wasn't able to up vote their older post.

So older posts could still draw new readers who then go on to vote for newer posts.

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63
  ·  10 months ago

Yeah but wouldn't it be nicer to just vote or tip the guy for that article, instead of working around the disabled features?

63
  ·  10 months ago

This is why I stopped posting here for a while. Imgur and another site have lost some of my links and pictures, and then steemit removed the ability to fix the posts!

I would rather stop posting here than leave articles with broken links and broken pictures around. I wanted to sell items here, but that would look even more unprofessional if you cannot delete old or incorrect or sold items.
If they don't listen to your point, I am probably done wasting time here.

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61
  ·  10 months ago

https://www.steemimg.com/ image hosting made specific for steem by @blueorgy

Can send SBD/Steem his way to keep it going.

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64
  ·  10 months ago

We are absolutely listening. :)

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Thank you :)

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63
  ·  10 months ago

That's good to hear, because it's getting pretty depressing around here with all the feature removals, people leaving, and constant dumping. Just look at the site stats and goodbye posts, removing peoples control over their articles and public information is killing the incentive to create new stuff to post here...

Competition is coming. Full control needs to be given back to the users over their own content if you expect them to stay. If you had a choice between two social media sites and one let you edit posts and send private messages, and one did not. Which one would you pick?

61
  ·  10 months ago

likely they found non-expiring rewards would be too 'gameable' in some way

such as gain more steempower, go back upvote yourself or other accounts, sock-puppet or friend. Could be incentive to power up, but maybe non-expiring payout could negate the investment anyway. Extending payout would be more complicated not less.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

I don't really think so. If you have a real example, I would be really happy to analyze it. The more we can model this thing before they will start implementing it, the better it will be.

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61
  ·  10 months ago

are they going to implement it? I would like it to work to still make steem currencies indefinitely. No example in mind to my previous comment, just musing at possible reason it is 30 days only atm.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

They are listening (look at the comments, there is one from @sneak, a developer) so they may start implementing it. We can help by making the issue clearer and prevent as much trouble as possible before getting into the coding stage. As I understand, you don't have yet an example of how this could be gamed. But if you find one, leave it in a comment, I'd love to play with it and see if I can break it down.

25
  ·  10 months ago

can't you just repost the content after 30 days?

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Of course you can, but that approach is creating more problems than it solves:

  1. Google will see more duplicate content, penalizing the mother site, steemit.com
  2. As per Steemit rules right now you can only post 4 main articles per day, starting with the 5th the payout decreases significantly (in order to discourage spamming). So if you start reposting heavily, you will not have room for new content.
  3. The more new content you post, the better your reputation, the more people will be interested in your old content as well. That's the way it should work, IMHO.

With that being said, I'm in favor of repurposing content every once in a while, because you can integrate new stuff in it.

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64
  ·  10 months ago

Thanks I thought this would be your reply as I get worried about duplicate content in general I would delete post and only do reposts once in a while, as I have seen other giant sites repost the same old articles too often.

72
  ·  10 months ago

Fantastic post buddy. I really like the solutions you offer as well. You have a new follower and upvoted.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Thanks :)

67
  ·  10 months ago

True.

Great numbers, congrats :)

About taking your content elsewhere. You can't even delete your post...

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72
  ·  10 months ago

It's ok about not deleting your post, because it's in the blockchain and must be visible as a proof of stake. But as long as there are eyeballs, there should be payment.

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54
  ·  10 months ago

Satisfaction that comes from consuming the content is the payment that it gives to the consumer. It doesn't always have to be a monetary payment.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Of course. Monetary payment comes only if the reader is voluntarily engaging in it, by commenting or upvoting. But right now if the reader wants to engage in something like that, the author doesn't get anything. And that lowers the value of the network, in total.

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63
  ·  10 months ago

You can actually. Right now, you can still delete if you post has no comments or votes. They only remove the ability after it has gotten attention...
The website is perfectly capable of displaying the last edited post or not showing a post marked deleted, they just removed the ability recently.
Good to see people talking about this, it is trivial to change back.

64
  ·  10 months ago

I hear you and I totally agree with this post 100%. Long-tail, timeless content is essential to the long-term growth of the platform.

I would love to be able to reap rewards for resurfacing old posts that got missed, and to get paid for stuff I write that brings traffic for years into the future.

FWIW, it was @ned that explicitly linked me to this post. We hear you and understand and will do our best to find a solution that works under the constraints we have.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Thank you. I'm happy @ned and other people from Steemit HQ are listening. I've been involved in startups for more than 17 years and I know how hard it is, especially in the beginning, when there is complete chaos and you don't know which feature to implement first and how this will affect the unfolding of the whole thing. If I can be of any help for this effort, please let me know.

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61
  ·  10 months ago

often content that is original can take such a long time to make. possibility of growing rewards mitigates that. and like mentioned reduces cross posting complete articles on other forums. also there are so mant old posts by people I often want to comment on and vote. People are always glad to receive comments, whether they wrote something today or two months previous doesnt matter

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60
  ·  10 months ago

So. Much. This!
Especially the way things are now, a lot of people who would get their kick out of a lot of us write don't always see a post in the first 24 hours, and a lot of times not in 30 hours, either.

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69
  ·  10 months ago

Then how about address the two open issues on GitHub regarding the matter? People keep opening the issue back up because it's an issue. You guys keep thinking it's ok for a witness to run on a raspberry pi powered by a solar cell and unicorn farts.
Please check GitHub I opened one up the day you announced the 30 day limit and I had a dozen authors lined up to come over but the limit squelched that and the final word was that if someone wants long term rewards that this isn't the platform for it.
https://github.com/steemit/steem/issues/267
Notice that this eventually led to @theoreticalbits saying tldr moved to his personal blog.

Point is this keeps coming up. People serious about long-term monetization of content won't waste time here if it's not fixed. That's pretty much every author that @ghostwriter and myself know. And we do know a few.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

I read your entry in Github. I think now there is a lot of buzz around this feature and they will find a way, somehow.

72
  ·  10 months ago

Thought-provoking post. I wonder if there is anything stopping us from just posting the same content again. If users think we are spamming, they won't vote or will flag us. If they find the repost useful, I daresay they would upvote.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

It was already talked about in the comments. It creates a "duplicate content" issue in Google, that will eventually penalize steemit.com, and it will also trigger duplicate content bots inside Steemit that will most likely flag and downvote the resurfaced posts.

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65
  ·  10 months ago

But if go into my post on day 29 and edit it to a short statement, there isn't any duplicate content, right? I'll be trying this, just as an experiment. I had been writing long posts (see - sumac, sunflowers, hops), because I understand the role of SEO and getting new folks to my Steemit blog and Steemit. But the risk/reward ration is too high, especially when people can't comment after 30 days, or my image links may break.

A hollowed-out post can still be positive, for example: I want you to be able to leave comments, so check out the original post that I transferred to my personal Wordpress blog.

58
  ·  10 months ago

This is an excellent article - and I absolutely don't understand that payout process as well. I mean, I don't get the need for splitting it up and then just cutting the authors off of any future votes. I've tried many times to vote content, and it took me a few times to realize that I just can't vote if the relevant post is older than 30 days.

66
  ·  10 months ago

If I remember correctly, the system was set originally so that the payouts were paid every 30 days. But this feature had to be limited to only one 30 day payout (after the first one) because it consumed too much RAM. Graphene keeps everything in memory so the memory requirements were going too high too fast. The Steem blockchain is amazing from the technological perspective, but unfortunately it has it's limitations, too.

It's not that the developers don't care timeless content, it's just that it's too costly to allow with the current blockchain. Graphene 2.0 might help with that.

My suggestion has been, as a compromise, Steem should allow users to pay if they want longer payout periods than 30 days. It would be fair: if the feature istoo costly to give away as free, users should pay for it. Then only those who really need it would use it and it wouldn't consume so much resources.

It would also increase the demand for steem and/or steem dollars, which would help to fight the high inflation.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

At first, your solution seemed a bit strange, but after giving it a little bit of thought, I think it might be useful.

But my iteration over your idea would be like: let's have different plans for people hosting content on Steemit: one would be "free", but it would limit payout only to the first 30 days (+ the first 24 hours) and the second would be "long term Steem" in which users will pay a monthly / yearly fee (like on a regular hosting service) in order to continue to receive payment for as long as they pay their hosting.

Even from a technical point of view this solution could be easier: keep the short term content in memory, and the long term content, the paid one, separated, possibly in a child blockchain.

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66
  ·  10 months ago

A few months ago I was thinking about having several blockchains as sidechains to serve different timescales for content.

Three-blockchain-model could be something like this:

  • Fresh content. Twitter-like short messages, memes, breaking news. If content is older than 24 hours, very few are interested in it anymore.
  • Blog-like content. Essays, opinions, commentary, etc. Stays relevant from a few days to a few months.
  • Book-like content. Long texts. Stays relevant for years.

Different blockchains would have different incentive structures. Together they would serve all possible usecases and dominate the global social media usage.

But as long as we are on a one blockchain, maybe the easiest way is to allow users to pay a certain amount of steem or steem dollars to "activate" their old post to be eligible for receiving payouts again. This could be automated so that activation is made when the payout period is ending.

This way users could make money by promoting and resteeming their old articles when they become newsworthy or interesting in some way.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

cool stuff :)

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67
  ·  10 months ago

This could be done without permission, I suppose? Would require some sort of a payout escrow with a smart contract account acting as a third party (like @steemsports).

I think its a great idea if it can't be gamed somehow.

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74
  ·  10 months ago

That's a brilliant idea and would reduce the amount of memory required (separate chains).

65
  ·  10 months ago

I get what you are talking about. However, I think that there is a tendency to pronounce the death of Steemit over this issue or that without giving the development team time to work through the issues and bring new stuff online.

The site has been up since May. It's not like they have a template for what they are doing, thus the reason it remains in beta. Since the articles are not being removed after 30 days and are findable by Google and other search engines then they can serve as a way to bring people not only to the site but also to you.

Making sure there is a link to your profile clearly displayed in a post will help bring people to your recent posts which can be upvoted. At this stage of the site, I rarely find any of my posts being upvoted after a few days. So, not being able to upvote after 30 days is not yet a big issue. In time it may be.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

I totally understand that it's in beta and they're overwhelmed, been there countless times.

But, on the other hand, I think this is probably the most important user retention bottleneck. It draws authors away and, without authors, curators don't have much to do.

Like I said, it's a huge opportunity cost: the traction that gets Steemit now and the increasing quality of the content would be lost very soon and it would be a pity. That very visibility of the project, in the case of a massive defection of users and a possible implosion of Steemit, will cast a veil of negativity over the entire niche, reducing it to the old "spammy ponzi tipping site".

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65
  ·  10 months ago

I think you and I will need to agree to sort of disagree. I see it as a problem, but not a life threatening issue.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

We can safely agree to disagree on this one, no problem. Different people, different expectations, just one world to share. It's ok :)

54
  ·  10 months ago

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57
  ·  10 months ago

Great post! In fact, it was so good that we decided to feature it in our latest newspaper. Read it here: https://steemit.com/steemplus/@steemplus/steemplus-sunday-october-16-the-daily-newspaper-that-pays-you-to-find-high-quality-content

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72
  ·  10 months ago

Wow, thanks, appreciated :)

39
  ·  10 months ago

Currently Stiim, as well as many other projects, not enough simple and clear textbooks, and with Read translated into many languages.
You then consider things like the clear and (long-term profit from published materials), and many new ones, joined by grains collected information on various resources, capabilities and rules.
We must explain that uncertainty frightens?
Well, so it is possible to speculate about the long term of a single material (even for high-quality long-term content recognized here, it is available the prospect for the development, expansion to other resources. Or there will develop the direction of transfer of long-term high-quality materials in a separate repository, database, with the ability to access, searching, browsing).

65
  ·  10 months ago

Very interesting thought provoking article. Like on FB and an upvote here are so drastically different. Which is why the content here might be more timely.

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72
  ·  10 months ago

My thoughts exactly :)

61
  ·  10 months ago

I totally agree. I've been thinking about this since I started posting. What's the point of storing information forever if it won't be upvoted & commented on? If it won't even be viewed? Imagine if Wikipedia pages reset after 30 days. 🤣 I'd rather see a "Wikipedia of ideas & projects" than a "CNN of ideas & projects."

69
  ·  10 months ago

I'm not keen on the 30 day limit either. Content we post now in the early days of Steemit will have no value when millions join later on. I can imagine there are performance issues as @samupaha says when the blockchain has millions of past posts to check. Perhaps we could have the ability to re-feature a limited number of old posts for another 30 days. I sometimes find old posts I'd like to comment on, but it's not allowed. Even if there's no reward for that it should be possible to keep the conversation going.

I expect we will see further changes and I hope some compromise can be found.