Bonsai !

in #bonsai11 months ago

Hey everyone what could possibly be more exciting for a nature lover such as myself than epic growth on ones recently cultivated bonsai tree's looking incredibly well below..

thumbnail_20201104_081928.jpg

As per wikipedia.org Many cherries are allied to the subgenus Prunus subg. Cerasus, which is distinguished by having the flowers in small corymbs of several together (not singly, nor in racemes), and by having smooth fruit with only a weak groove along one side, or no groove. The subgenus is native to the temperate regions of the Northern Hemisphere, with two species in America, three in Europe, and the remainder in Asia. Other cherry fruits are borne on racemes and called bird cherries. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry

thumbnail_20201104_081855.jpg

thumbnail_20201104_081906.jpg

thumbnail_20201104_081858.jpg

Some really interesting reading here as per wikipedia re Cherry Tree's The English word cherry derives from Old Northern French or Norman cherise from the Latin cerasum,[1] referring to an ancient Greek region, Kerasous (Κερασοῦς) near Giresun, Turkey, from which cherries were first thought to be exported to Europe.[2] The indigenous range of the sweet cherry extends through most of Europe, western Asia, and parts of northern Africa, and the fruit has been consumed throughout its range since prehistoric times. A cultivated cherry is recorded as having been brought to Rome by Lucius Licinius Lucullus from northeastern Anatolia, also known as the Pontus region, in 72 BC.[3]

Cherries were introduced into England at Teynham, near Sittingbourne in Kent, by order of Henry VIII, who had tasted them in Flanders.[4][5][6]

Cherries arrived in North America early in the settlement of Brooklyn, New York (then called "New Netherland") when the region was under Dutch sovereignty. Trades people leased or purchased land to plant orchards and produce gardens, "Certificate of Corielis van Tienlioven that he had found 12 apple, 40 peach, 73 cherry trees, 26 sage plants.., behind the house sold by Anthony Jansen from Salee [Morocco, Africa] to Barent Dirksen [Dutchmen],... ANNO 18th of June 1639."[7] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry

White Stinkwood are really nice tree's to make from bonsai, These are fast growing can be shaped really easily and is a lush green leafy prolific grower.

thumbnail_20201104_081903.jpg

Paper bark another incredibly nice Tree not as fast growing as Stinkwood but very prolific and pretty, more here as wikipedia.org Acacia, commonly known as the wattles or acacias, is a large genus of shrubs and trees in the subfamily Mimosoideae of the pea family Fabaceae. It comprises a group of plant genera native to Africa and Australasia. The genus name is New Latin from the Greek word for 'thorn' from the habit of many species originally included in the genus.[4]

In the early 2000s when it had become evident that the genus as it stood was not monophyletic and that several divergent lineages needed to be placed in separate genera. It turned out that one lineage comprising over 900 species mainly native to Australia New Guinea and Indonesia was not closely related to the much smaller group of African lineage that contained A. nilotica—the type species. This meant that the Australasian lineage (by far the most prolific in number of species) would need to be renamed. Botanist Les Pedley named this group Racosperma, which was not adopted. Australian botanists proposed a less disruptive solution setting a different type species (A. penninervis) and allowing this largest number of species to remain Acacia, resulting in the two African lineages being renamed Vachellia and Senegalia, and the two New World lineages renamed Acaciella and Mariosousa.[5] This was officially adopted. Acacia remains a widely used common name across genera .

A number of species have been introduced to various parts of the world, and two million hectares of commercial plantations have been established.[6] The heterogeneous group[7] varies considerably in habit, from mat-like subshrubs to canopy trees in forest.[8]

thumbnail_20201104_081909.jpg

thumbnail_20201104_081913.jpg

I grow many of my Trees at an angle the idea is to get it to grow in a horizontal fashion and then the tip to face skyward, I am quiet sure it will look incredible in a year or two's time?

Below another general overview of half of my collection!

thumbnail_20201104_081919.jpg

Nature the incredible!

Love and light have an amazing Wednesday!

Cheer$;)