Latest Arxiv Papers In Astrophysics A |2019-06-05

in astrophysics •  3 months ago 

The Latest Research Papers in Astrophysics

Astrophysics Of Galaxies


Enhanced cluster lensing models with measured galaxy kinematics (1905.13236v2)

P. Bergamini, P. Rosati, A. Mercurio, C. Grillo, G. B. Caminha, M. Meneghetti, A. Agnello, A. Biviano, F. Calura, C. Giocoli, M. Lombardi, G. Rodighiero, E. Vanzella

2019-05-30

We present improved mass models of three CLASH/HFF massive clusters, MACS J1206.2-0847, MACS J0416.1-0403, Abell S1063. We reconstruct the subhalo mass component with robust stellar kinematics of cluster galaxies, coupled with precise strong lensing models from large samples of spectroscopically confirmed multiple images. We use VLT/MUSE integral-field spectroscopy in the cluster cores to measure the stellar velocity dispersion of 40-60 member galaxies per cluster, covering 4-5 magnitudes to . We test the accuracy of velocity dispersion measurements on mock spectra, thus quantifying the limiting signal-to-noise and minimum velocity ( km/s) for the depth of the spectra presented here. With these data, we determine the normalization and slope of the Faber-Jackson relation in each cluster and use it a prior for the scaling relations of the sub-halo population in the lensing mass models. Compared to our previous lens models, the inclusion of stellar kinematics yields a similar precision in the predicted positions of the multiple images. However, the inherent degeneracy between the central effective velocity dispersion, , and truncation radius, , of subhalos is strongly reduced, significantly alleviating systematics in the measurements of subhalo masses. The three independent determinations of the relation in each cluster are fully consistent, enabling a statistical determination of subhalo sizes at given or mass. Finally, we derive the galaxy central velocity dispersion functions of the three clusters projected within 16% of their virial radii, finding that they are well in agreement with each other. This methodology, when applied to high-quality kinematics and strong lensing data, allows the subhalo mass functions to be determined and compared with predictions from cosmological simulations.

The faint end of the Luminosity Function of Lyman-alpha emitters behind lensing clusters observed with MUSE (1905.13696v2)

G. de La Vieuville, D. Bina, R. Pello, G. Mahler, J. Richard, A. B. Drake, E. C. Herenz, F. E. Bauer, B. Clément, D. Lagattuta, N. Laporte, J. Martinez, V. Patriìcio, L. Wisotzki, J. Zabl, R. J. Bouwens, T. Contini, T. Garel, B. Guiderdoni, R. A. Marino, M. V. Maseda, J. Matthee, J. Schaye, G. Soucail

2019-05-31

We present the results obtained with VLT/MUSE on the faint-end of the Lyman-alpha luminosity function (LF) based on deep observations of four lensing clusters. The precise aim of the present study is to further constrain the abundance of Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) by taking advantage of the magnification provided by lensing clusters. We blindly selected a sample of 156 LAEs, with redshifts between and magnification-corrected luminosities in the range [erg s] . The price to pay to benefit from magnification is a reduction of the effective volume of the survey, together with a more complex analysis procedure. To properly take into account the individual differences in detection conditions (including lensing configurations, spatial and spectral morphologies) when computing the LF, a new method based on the 1/Vmax approach was implemented. The LAE LF has been obtained in four different redshift bins with constraints down to . From our data only, no significant evolution of LF mean slope can be found. When performing a Schechter analysis including data from the literature to complete the present sample a steep faint-end slope was measured varying from to between the lowest and the highest redshift bins. The contribution of the LAE population to the star formation rate density at is % depending on the luminosity limit considered, which is of the same order as the Lyman-break galaxy (LBG) contribution. The evolution of the LAE contribution with redshift depends on the assumed escape fraction of Lyman-alpha photons, and appears to slightly increase with increasing redshift when this fraction is conservatively set to one. (abridged)

Microlensing events in the Galactic bulge (1905.01563v2)

Maria Gabriela Navarro, Dante Minniti, Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta, Rodrigo Contreras Ramos, Joyce Pullen

2019-05-04

For the first time we detected microlensing events at zero latitude in the Galactic bulge using the VISTA Variables in the Via Lactea Survey (VVV) data. We have discovered a total sample of N = 630 events within an area covering 20.7 sq. deg. Using the near-IR color magnitude diagram we selected N = 291 red clump sources, allowing us to analyse the longitude dependence of microlensing across the central region of the Galactic plane. We thoroughly accounted for the photometric and sampling efficiency. The spatial distribution is homogeneous, with the number of events smoothly increasing toward the Galactic center. We find a slight asymmetry, with a larger number of events toward negative longitudes than positive longitudes, that is possibly related with the inclination of the bar along the line of sight. We also examined the timescale distribution which shows a mean on 17.4 +- 1.0 days for the whole sample, and 20.7 +- 1.0 for the Red Clump subsample.

Influence of galactic arm scale dynamics on the molecular composition of the cold and dense ISM II. Molecular oxygen abundance (1905.00800v2)

V. Wakelam, M. Ruaud, P. Gratier, I. A. Bonnell

2019-05-02

Molecular oxygen has been the subject of many observational searches as chemical models predicted it to be a reservoir of oxygen. Although it has been detected in two regions of the interstellar medium, its rarity is a challenge for astrochemical models. In this paper, we have combined the physical conditions computed with smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations with our full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus, to study the predicted O2 abundance in interstellar material forming cold cores. We thus follow the chemical evolution of gas and ices in parcels of material from the diffuse interstellar conditions to the cold dense cores. Most of our predicted O2 abundances are below 1e-8 (with respect to the total proton density) and the predicted column densities in simulated cold cores is at maximum a few 1e14 cm-2, in agreement with the non detection limits. This low O2 abundance can be explained by the fact that, in a large fraction of the interstellar material, the atomic oxygen is depleted onto the grain surface (and hydrogenated to form H2O) before O2 can be formed in the gas-phase and protected from UV photo-dissociations. We could achieve this result only because we took into account the full history of the evolution of the physical conditions from the diffuse medium to the cold cores.

Mapping the Galactic disk with red clump stars from LAMOST and Gaia II: 3D asymmetrical kinematics of mono-age populations in the disk between 6-14 kpc (1905.11944v2)

H. -F. Wang, Y. Huang, J. L. Carlin, M. López-Corredoira, B. -Q. Chen, C. Wang, J. Chang, H. -W. Zhang, M. -S. Xiang, H. -B. Yuan, W. -X. Sun, X. -Y. Li, Y. Yang, L. -C. Deng

2019-05-28

We perform analysis of the three-dimensional kinematics of Milky Way disk stars in mono-age populations. We focus on stars between Galactocentric distances of and 14 ,kpc, selected from the combined LAMOST DR4 red clump giant stars and Gaia DR2 proper motion catalogue. We confirm the 3D asymmetrical motions of recent works, and we provide time tagging of the Galactic outer disk asymmetrical motions near the anticenter direction out to Galactocentric distances of 14,kpc. Radial Galactocentric motions reach values up to 10 km s, depending on the age of the population, and present a north-south asymmetry in the region corresponding to density and velocity substructures that were sensitive to the perturbations in the early 6 ,Gyr. After that time, the disk stars of this structure are becoming older and kinematically hotter and not sensitive to the possible perturbations, and we find it is a low , metal rich, relatively younger population. With the quantitative analysis, we find stars both above and below the plane at kpc exhibit bending mode motions of which the sensitive duration is around 8 ,Gyr. Some possible scenarios for these asymmetries are discussed, including a fast rotating bar, spiral arms, minor mergers, sub-halos, warp dynamics, and streams. Although we cannot rule out other factors, for the current results, we speculate that the in-plane asymmetries might be mainly caused by gravitational attraction of overdensities in a spiral arm or monolithic collapse of isolated self-gravitating overdensities from out-of-equilibrium systems. Vertical motions might be dominated by bending and breathing modes induced by inner or external perturbers.

Earth And Planetary Astrophysics


What the sudden death of solar cycles can tell us about the nature of the solar interior (1901.09083v2)

Scott W. McIntosh, Robert J. Leamon, Ricky Egeland, Mausumi Dikpati, Yuhong Fan, Matthias Rempel

2019-01-25

We observe the abrupt end of solar activity cycles at the Sun's equator by combining almost 140 years of observations from ground and space. These "terminator" events appear to be very closely related to the onset of magnetic activity belonging to the next sunspot cycle at mid-latitudes and the polar-reversal process at high-latitudes. Using multi-scale tracers of solar activity we examine the timing of these events in relation to the excitation of new activity and find that the time taken for the solar plasma to communicate this transition is of the order of one solar rotation, but could be shorter. Utilizing uniquely comprehensive solar observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) we see that this transitional event is strongly longitudinal in nature. Combined, these characteristics imply that magnetic information is communicated through the solar interior rapidly. A range of possibilities exist to explain such behavior: the presence of magnetic reconnection in the deep interior, internal gravity waves on the solar tachocline, or that the magnetic fields present in the Sun's convection zone could be very large, with a poloidal field strengths reaching 50k - considerably larger than conventional explorations of solar and stellar dynamos estimate. Regardless of mechanism responsible, the rapid timescales demonstrated by the Sun's global magnetic field reconfiguration present strong constraints on first-principles numerical simulations of the solar interior and, by extension, other stars.

Star-planet tidal interaction and the limits of gyrochronology (1905.06070v2)

Florian Gallet, Philippe Delorme

2019-05-15

Age estimation techniques such as gyrochronology and magnetochronology can't be applied to stars that exchanged angular momentum with their close environment. This is especially true for massive close-in planetary companion (with a periods of few days or less), which could have been strongly impacted the rotational evolution of the host star, along the stellar evolution, through the star-planet tidal interaction. We showed that the interaction of a close-in massive planet with its host star can strongly modify the surface rotation rate of this latter, in most of the cases associated to a planetary engulfment. In such cases, a gyrochronology analysis of the star would wrongly make it appear as "rejuvenated", thus preventing us to use this method with confidence. To try overcome this issue, we eventually proposed the proof of concept of a new age determination technique that we call the tidal-chronology, which is based on the observed couple - of a given star-planet system. The gyrochronology technique can only be applied to isolated star or star-planet systems outside a specific range of -. This region tends to expand for increasing stellar and planetary mass. In that forbidden region, or if any planetary engulfment is suspected, gyrochronology should be used with extreme caution while tidal-chronology could be considered. While this technique does not provide a precise age for the system yet, it is already an extension of gyrochronology and could be helpful to determine a more precise range of possible age for planetary system composed of a star between 0.3 and 1.2 and a planet more massive than 1 initially located at few hundredth au of the host star.

Retired A Stars Revisited: An Updated Giant Planet Occurrence Rate as a Function of Stellar Metallicity and Mass (1804.09082v3)

Luan Ghezzi, Benjamin T. Montet, John Asher Johnson

2018-04-24

Exoplanet surveys of evolved stars have provided increasing evidence that the formation of giant planets depends not only on stellar metallicity ([Fe/H]), but also the mass (). However, measuring accurate masses for subgiants and giants is far more challenging than it is for their main-sequence counterparts, which has led to recent concerns regarding the veracity of the correlation between stellar mass and planet occurrence. In order to address these concerns we use HIRES spectra to perform a spectroscopic analysis on an sample of 245 subgiants and derive new atmospheric and physical parameters. We also calculate the space velocities of this sample in a homogeneous manner for the first time. When reddening corrections are considered in the calculations of stellar masses and a -0.12 M offset is applied to the results, the masses of the subgiants are consistent with their space velocity distributions, contrary to claims in the literature. Similarly, our measurements of their rotational velocities provide additional confirmation that the masses of subgiants with M (the "Retired A Stars") have not been overestimated in previous analyses. Using these new results for our sample of evolved stars, together with an updated sample of FGKM dwarfs, we confirm that giant planet occurrence increases with both stellar mass and metallicity up to 2.0 M. We show that the probability of formation of a giant planet is approximately a one-to-one function of the total amount of metals in the protoplanetary disk . This correlation provides additional support for the core accretion mechanism of planet formation.

Transiting exocomets detected in broadband light by TESS in the Pictoris system (1903.11071v2)

Sebastian Zieba, Konstanze Zwintz, Matthew A. Kenworthy, Grant M. Kennedy

2019-03-26

We search for signs of falling evaporating bodies (FEBs, also known as exocomets) in photometric time series obtained for Pictoris after fitting and removing its Scuti type pulsation frequencies. Using photometric data obtained by the TESS satellite we determine the pulsational properties of the exoplanet host star Pictoris through frequency analysis. We then prewhiten the 54 identified Scuti p-modes and investigate the residual photometric time series for the presence of FEBs. We identify three distinct dipping events in the light curve of Pictoris over a 105-day period. These dips have depths from 0.5 to 2 millimagnitudes and durations of up to 2 days for the largest dip. These dips are asymmetric in nature and are consistent with a model of an evaporating comet with an extended tail crossing the disk of the star. We present the first broadband detections of exocomets crossing the disk of Pictoris, consistent with the predictions made 20 years earlier by Lecavelier Des Etangs et al. (1999). No periodic transits are seen in this time series. These observations confirm the spectroscopic detection of exocomets in Calcium H and K lines that have been seen in high resolution spectroscopy.

Migration of D-type asteroids from the outer Solar System inferred from carbonate in meteorites (1905.13620v1)

Wataru Fujiya, Peter Hoppe, Takayuki Ushikubo, Kohei Fukuda, Paula Lindgren, Martin R. Lee, Mizuho Koike, Kotaro Shirai, Yuji Sano

2019-05-31

Recent dynamical models of Solar System evolution and isotope studies of rock-forming elements in meteorites have suggested that volatile-rich asteroids formed in the outer Solar System beyond Jupiter's orbit, despite being currently located in the main asteroid belt. The ambient temperature under which asteroids formed is a crucial diagnostic to pinpoint the original location of asteroids and is potentially determined by the abundance of volatiles they contain. In particular, abundances and 13C/12C ratios of carbonates in meteorites record the abundances of carbon-bearing volatile species in their parent asteroids. However, the sources of carbon for these carbonates remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Tagish Lake meteorite contains abundant carbonates with consistently high 13C/12C ratios. The high abundance of 13C-rich carbonates in Tagish Lake excludes organic matter as their main carbon source. Therefore, the Tagish Lake parent body, presumably a D-type asteroid, must have accreted a large amount of 13C-rich CO2 ice. The estimated 13C/12C and CO2/H2O ratios of ice in Tagish Lake are similar to those of cometary ice. Thus, we infer that at least some D-type asteroids formed in the cold outer Solar System and were subsequently transported into the inner Solar System owing to an orbital instability of the giant planets.

Solar And Stellar Astrophysics


What the sudden death of solar cycles can tell us about the nature of the solar interior (1901.09083v2)

Scott W. McIntosh, Robert J. Leamon, Ricky Egeland, Mausumi Dikpati, Yuhong Fan, Matthias Rempel

2019-01-25

We observe the abrupt end of solar activity cycles at the Sun's equator by combining almost 140 years of observations from ground and space. These "terminator" events appear to be very closely related to the onset of magnetic activity belonging to the next sunspot cycle at mid-latitudes and the polar-reversal process at high-latitudes. Using multi-scale tracers of solar activity we examine the timing of these events in relation to the excitation of new activity and find that the time taken for the solar plasma to communicate this transition is of the order of one solar rotation, but could be shorter. Utilizing uniquely comprehensive solar observations from the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO), and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) we see that this transitional event is strongly longitudinal in nature. Combined, these characteristics imply that magnetic information is communicated through the solar interior rapidly. A range of possibilities exist to explain such behavior: the presence of magnetic reconnection in the deep interior, internal gravity waves on the solar tachocline, or that the magnetic fields present in the Sun's convection zone could be very large, with a poloidal field strengths reaching 50k - considerably larger than conventional explorations of solar and stellar dynamos estimate. Regardless of mechanism responsible, the rapid timescales demonstrated by the Sun's global magnetic field reconfiguration present strong constraints on first-principles numerical simulations of the solar interior and, by extension, other stars.

Neutron-Star-Merger Equation of State (1905.12658v2)

Veronica Dexheimer, Constantinos Constantinou, Elias R. Most, L. Jens Papenfort, Matthias Hanauske, Stefan Schramm, Horst Stoecker, Luciano Rezzolla

2019-05-29

In this work, we discuss the dense matter equation of state (EOS) for the extreme range of conditions encountered in neutron stars and their mergers. The calculation of the properties of such an EOS involves modeling different degrees of freedom (such as nuclei, nucleons, hyperons, and quarks), taking into account different symmetries, and including finite density and temperature effects in a thermodynamically consistent manner. We begin by addressing subnuclear matter consisting of nucleons and a small admixture of light nuclei in the context of the excluded volume approach. We then turn our attention to supranuclear homogeneous matter as described by the Chiral Mean Field (CMF) formalism. Finally, we present results from realistic neutron-star-merger simulations performed using the CMF model that predict signatures for deconfinement to quark matter in gravitational wave signals.

Star-planet tidal interaction and the limits of gyrochronology (1905.06070v2)

Florian Gallet, Philippe Delorme

2019-05-15

Age estimation techniques such as gyrochronology and magnetochronology can't be applied to stars that exchanged angular momentum with their close environment. This is especially true for massive close-in planetary companion (with a periods of few days or less), which could have been strongly impacted the rotational evolution of the host star, along the stellar evolution, through the star-planet tidal interaction. We showed that the interaction of a close-in massive planet with its host star can strongly modify the surface rotation rate of this latter, in most of the cases associated to a planetary engulfment. In such cases, a gyrochronology analysis of the star would wrongly make it appear as "rejuvenated", thus preventing us to use this method with confidence. To try overcome this issue, we eventually proposed the proof of concept of a new age determination technique that we call the tidal-chronology, which is based on the observed couple - of a given star-planet system. The gyrochronology technique can only be applied to isolated star or star-planet systems outside a specific range of -. This region tends to expand for increasing stellar and planetary mass. In that forbidden region, or if any planetary engulfment is suspected, gyrochronology should be used with extreme caution while tidal-chronology could be considered. While this technique does not provide a precise age for the system yet, it is already an extension of gyrochronology and could be helpful to determine a more precise range of possible age for planetary system composed of a star between 0.3 and 1.2 and a planet more massive than 1 initially located at few hundredth au of the host star.

Fast-Cadence TESS Photometry and Doppler Tomography of the Asynchronous Polar CD Ind: A Revised Accretion Geometry from Newly Proposed Spin and Orbital Periods (1903.00490v2)

Colin Littlefield, Peter Garnavich, Koji Mukai, Paul A. Mason, Paula Szkody, Mark Kennedy, Gordon Myers, Robert Schwarz

2019-03-01

The TESS spacecraft observed the asynchronous polar CD Ind at a two-minute cadence almost continuously for 28 days in 2018, covering parts of 5 consecutive cycles of the system's 7.3-day beat period. These observations provide the first uninterrupted photometry of a full spin-orbit beat cycle of an asynchronous polar. Twice per beat cycle, the accretion flow switched between magnetic poles on the white dwarf, causing the spin pulse of the white dwarf (WD) to alternate between two waveforms after each pole-switch. An analysis of the waveforms suggests that one accretion region is continuously visible when it is active, while the other region experiences lengthy self-eclipses by the white dwarf. We argue that the previously accepted periods for both the binary orbit and the WD spin have been misidentified, and while the cause of this misidentification is a subtle and easily overlooked effect, it has profound consequences for the interpretation of the system's accretion geometry and doubles the estimated time to resynchronization. Moreover, our timings of the photometric maxima do not agree with the quadratic ephemeris from Myers et al. (2017), and it is possible that the optical spin pulse might be an unreliable indicator of the white dwarf's rotation. Finally, we use Doppler tomography of archival time-resolved spectra from 2006 to study the accretion flow. While the accretion flow showed a wider azimuthal extent than is typical for synchronous polars, it was significantly less extended than in the three other asynchronous polars for which Doppler tomography has been reported.

Slip-Back Mapping as a Tracker of Topological Changes in Evolving Magnetic Configurations (1905.01384v3)

R. Lionello, V. S. Titov, Z. Mikić, J. A. Linker

2019-05-03

The topology of the coronal magnetic field produces a strong impact on the properties of the solar corona and presumably on the origin of the slow solar wind. To advance our understanding of this impact, we revisit the concept of so-called slip-back mapping (Titov et al. 2009) and adapt it for determining open, closed, and disconnected flux systems that are formed in the solar corona by magnetic reconnection during a given time interval. The developed method allows us, in particular, to describe the magnetic flux transfer between open and closed flux regions via so-called interchange reconnection with unprecedented level of details. We illustrate the application of this method to the analysis of a global MHD evolution of the solar corona that is driven by an idealized differential rotation of the photospheric plasma.



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